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University of Minnesota

1. Glatzhofer, Sharrie Lynn. Social communication status as a risk factor for language development in young children adopted from Eastern European institutional care.

Degree: MA, Speech-language Pathology, 2010, University of Minnesota

University of Minnesota M.A. thesis. August 2010. Major: Speech-language Pathology. Advisors: Maria Kroupina, Ph.D. & Jennifer Windsor Ph.D. 1 computer file (PDF); vii, 64 pages. Appendix p. 53-64.

This study examined the relationship between initial social communication status and language development in infants and toddlers recently adopted from Eastern European institutional care. The responding joint attention (RJA) and initiating joint attention (IJA) skills of 61 children were measured at arrival and compared against receptive and expressive language outcomes 6 months later. Birth weight, height at arrival and age at arrival were also examined as risk factors for slower language development. Results indicated that receptive and expressive language outcomes were positively related to higher social communication skills. Specifically, RJA and IJA were significant predictors of receptive language development, and RJA was a significant predictor of overall expressive language development, above the contribution of age. Vocabulary was predicted by age at arrival and IJA skills. Height and birth weight were not predictive of language outcomes. Joint attention skills did not distinguish between higher and lower language performance when children were divided based on language cut-off scores. This study also found that adoption before an age of vocabulary acquisition did not distinguish between children with lower and higher language acquisition in this sample.

Advisors/Committee Members: Maria Kroupina, Ph.D. & Jennifer Windsor Ph.D.

Subjects/Keywords: Social communication; Institutional environments; Initiating joint attention (IJA); Responding behavior regulation; Expressive and receptive language; Speech-language Pathology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Glatzhofer, S. L. (2010). Social communication status as a risk factor for language development in young children adopted from Eastern European institutional care. (Masters Thesis). University of Minnesota. Retrieved from http://purl.umn.edu/101687

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Glatzhofer, Sharrie Lynn. “Social communication status as a risk factor for language development in young children adopted from Eastern European institutional care.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Minnesota. Accessed October 23, 2019. http://purl.umn.edu/101687.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Glatzhofer, Sharrie Lynn. “Social communication status as a risk factor for language development in young children adopted from Eastern European institutional care.” 2010. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Glatzhofer SL. Social communication status as a risk factor for language development in young children adopted from Eastern European institutional care. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Minnesota; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/101687.

Council of Science Editors:

Glatzhofer SL. Social communication status as a risk factor for language development in young children adopted from Eastern European institutional care. [Masters Thesis]. University of Minnesota; 2010. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/101687


University of Minnesota

2. Glatzhofer, Sharrie Lynn. Social communication status as a risk factor for language development in young children adopted from Eastern European institutional care.

Degree: MA, Speech-language Pathology, 2010, University of Minnesota

This study examined the relationship between initial social communication status and language development in infants and toddlers recently adopted from Eastern European institutional care. The responding joint attention (RJA) and initiating joint attention (IJA) skills of 61 children were measured at arrival and compared against receptive and expressive language outcomes 6 months later. Birth weight, height at arrival and age at arrival were also examined as risk factors for slower language development. Results indicated that receptive and expressive language outcomes were positively related to higher social communication skills. Specifically, RJA and IJA were significant predictors of receptive language development, and RJA was a significant predictor of overall expressive language development, above the contribution of age. Vocabulary was predicted by age at arrival and IJA skills. Height and birth weight were not predictive of language outcomes. Joint attention skills did not distinguish between higher and lower language performance when children were divided based on language cut-off scores. This study also found that adoption before an age of vocabulary acquisition did not distinguish between children with lower and higher language acquisition in this sample.

Subjects/Keywords: Social communication; Institutional environments; Initiating joint attention (IJA); Responding behavior regulation; Expressive and receptive language; Speech-language Pathology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Glatzhofer, S. L. (2010). Social communication status as a risk factor for language development in young children adopted from Eastern European institutional care. (Masters Thesis). University of Minnesota. Retrieved from http://purl.umn.edu/101687

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Glatzhofer, Sharrie Lynn. “Social communication status as a risk factor for language development in young children adopted from Eastern European institutional care.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Minnesota. Accessed October 23, 2019. http://purl.umn.edu/101687.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Glatzhofer, Sharrie Lynn. “Social communication status as a risk factor for language development in young children adopted from Eastern European institutional care.” 2010. Web. 23 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Glatzhofer SL. Social communication status as a risk factor for language development in young children adopted from Eastern European institutional care. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Minnesota; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 23]. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/101687.

Council of Science Editors:

Glatzhofer SL. Social communication status as a risk factor for language development in young children adopted from Eastern European institutional care. [Masters Thesis]. University of Minnesota; 2010. Available from: http://purl.umn.edu/101687

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