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You searched for subject:( Cumulative commitment). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Kilbourne, Brianne. Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity as a Protective Factor in the Context of Risk: A Moderator Model Predicting Institutional Commitment.

Degree: 2014, Liberty University

The purpose of this quantitative, non-experimental correlational study was to determine if cumulative risk is associated with undergraduate student institutional commitment. Additionally, moderate to vigorous physical activity was investigated as a moderator of the association between cumulative risk and institutional commitment, specifically serving as a protective factor for students experiencing high levels of cumulative risk factors. Data were collected through anonymous, online surveys from a convenience sample of undergraduate students enrolled at a large, Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS)-accredited, 4-year private university located in Virginia. The statistical program, SPSS 22.0 (2013) was used to analyze the descriptive analysis and test the assumptions. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to statistically analyze the association between: (a) cumulative risk and institutional commitment, (b) moderate to vigorous physical activity and institutional commitment, and (c) the interaction between cumulative risk and physical activity and institutional commitment. Hypothesis 1 was supported by the findings, which suggested that cumulative risk was negatively associated with institutional commitment. Hypotheses 2 and 3 were rejected, since moderate to vigorous physical activity was not found to be significantly associated with institutional commitment. Additionally, moderate to vigorous physical activity did not moderate the association between cumulative risk and institutional commitment. The findings from this study can be used to inform student retention research by providing evidence of a predictive association between cumulative risk and institutional commitment (i.e., risk of departure). While moderate to vigorous physical activity was not found to moderate the association between cumulative risk and institutional commitment, future researchers should investigate potential moderators.

Subjects/Keywords: cumulative risk; physical activity; undergraduate institutional commitment; Education; Educational Leadership; Higher Education; Higher Education Administration

…institutional commitment (Woosley, Slabaugh, Sadler, & Mason, 2005). Cumulative Risk… …institutional commitment. This current study used cumulative risk and incorporated it within a model… …of the association between cumulative risk and institutional commitment. The predictor… …ACT/SAT scores? RQ3: Is the association between cumulative risk and institutional commitment… …level of cumulative risk will exhibit low institutional commitment, while controlling for… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kilbourne, B. (2014). Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity as a Protective Factor in the Context of Risk: A Moderator Model Predicting Institutional Commitment. (Doctoral Dissertation). Liberty University. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/doctoral/875

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kilbourne, Brianne. “Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity as a Protective Factor in the Context of Risk: A Moderator Model Predicting Institutional Commitment.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Liberty University. Accessed December 04, 2020. http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/doctoral/875.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kilbourne, Brianne. “Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity as a Protective Factor in the Context of Risk: A Moderator Model Predicting Institutional Commitment.” 2014. Web. 04 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Kilbourne B. Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity as a Protective Factor in the Context of Risk: A Moderator Model Predicting Institutional Commitment. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Liberty University; 2014. [cited 2020 Dec 04]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/doctoral/875.

Council of Science Editors:

Kilbourne B. Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity as a Protective Factor in the Context of Risk: A Moderator Model Predicting Institutional Commitment. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Liberty University; 2014. Available from: http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/doctoral/875


AUT University

2. Cheri, Bella. The Antecedents of Consumer Brand Engagement: The Role of Relationship Quality .

Degree: AUT University

The assessment of the effects on consumer brand engagement has been under recent investigation. Literature has continually mentioned a lack of knowledge regarding how consumers’ relationship quality with a brand affects consumer brand engagement. Further, the recent growth in social media and technology use and its direct influence on consumer brand engagement and relationship quality has also been highlighted as a topic for further investigation. This research aimed to address these gaps by examining variance in smartphone usage, application usage and demographics to determine how these factors mediate the effects of relationship quality on consumer brand engagement. 200 students were directly targeted through a survey questionnaire to gather empirical data. Analysis of the data indicated that the higher a consumer is cognitively, emotionally or behaviourally engaged with a brand, the more they feel the brand is fulfilling their goals, expectations, predictions and desires and performing in a way they deem acceptable in terms of creating satisfaction, trust and commitment towards the brand. Specifically, significant relationships were discovered between cognitive processing and trust. Activation had a positive relationship with satisfaction and trust. Affection had a positive relationship with all three relationship quality constructs of satisfaction, trust and commitment. The study also found that differences relating to type of brand, total phone usage and total frequency of application usage significantly affected the level of consumer engagement. Gender, type of brand, total phone usage and total frequency of application usage also significantly affected the quality of the brand relationship. Age and income did not have a significant effect on relationship quality or engagement. The implications of these findings mean that managers can assess the relationship quality construct they wish to strengthen with targeted consumers and use different engagement aspects to achieve positive relationship outcomes. Advisors/Committee Members: Glynn, Mark (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Consumer engagement; Customer engagement; Consumer brand engagement; Customer brand engagement; Relationship quality; Trust; Satisfaction; Commitment; Antececents; Consequences; Cognitive processing; Cognitive; Cognitively; Emotional; Affective; Affection; Behavioural; Behavioral; Activation; Loyalty; Relationship management; Marketing management; Drivers; Customer delight; Consumer delight; Repurchase; Repurchase behaviour; Affective commitment; Cumulative commitment; Love; Partnership; Brand loyalty; Service-dominance; Service-dominance logic; Co-creation; Brand experience; Consumer; Customer; Consumer identification; Self-schema; Self-concept; BESC; CBE; Brand engagement in self-concept; Calculative commitment; Goal pursuit; Brand personality; Brand management; Brand engagement; Engagement; Phone; Technology; Social media; Millennial; Generation C; Apple; Samsung; iPhone; Nokia; Phone usage; Application; Smartphone; Application usage

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cheri, B. (n.d.). The Antecedents of Consumer Brand Engagement: The Role of Relationship Quality . (Thesis). AUT University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10224

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cheri, Bella. “The Antecedents of Consumer Brand Engagement: The Role of Relationship Quality .” Thesis, AUT University. Accessed December 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10224.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cheri, Bella. “The Antecedents of Consumer Brand Engagement: The Role of Relationship Quality .” Web. 04 Dec 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Cheri B. The Antecedents of Consumer Brand Engagement: The Role of Relationship Quality . [Internet] [Thesis]. AUT University; [cited 2020 Dec 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10224.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Cheri B. The Antecedents of Consumer Brand Engagement: The Role of Relationship Quality . [Thesis]. AUT University; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10292/10224

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation
No year of publication.

.