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You searched for subject:( Charles Simeon). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Plymouth

1. Esposito, Donato. The artistic discovery of Assyria by Britain and France 1850 to 1950.

Degree: PhD, 2011, University of Plymouth

This thesis provides an overview of the engagement with the material culture of Assyria, unearthed in the Middle East from 1845 onwards by British and French archaeologists. It sets the artistic discovery of Assyria within the visual culture of the period through reference not only to painting but also to illustrated newspapers, books, journals, performances and popular entertainments. The thesis presents a more vigorous, interlinked, and widespread engagement than previous studies have indicated, primarily by providing a comprehensive corpus of artistic responses. The artistic connections between Britain and France were close. Works influenced by Assyria were published, exhibited and reviewed in the contemporary press, on both sides of the English Channel. Some artists, such as Gustave Doré, successfully maintained careers in both London and Paris. It is therefore often meaningless to speak of a wholly ‘French’ or ‘British’ reception, since these responses were coloured by artistic crosscurrents that operated in both directions, a crucial theme to be explored in this dissertation. In Britain, print culture also transported to the regions, away from large metropolitan centres, knowledge of Assyria and Assyrian-inspired art through its appeal to the market for biblical images. Assyria benefited from the explosion in graphical communication. This thesis examines the artistic response to Assyria within a chronological framework. It begins with an overview of the initial period in the 1850s that traces the first British discoveries. Chapter Two explores the different artistic turn Assyria took in the 1860s. Chapter Three deals with the French reception in the second half of the nineteenth century. Chapter Four concludes the British reception up to 1900, and Chapter Five deals with the twentieth century. The thesis contends that far from being a niche subject engaged with a particular group of artists, Assyrian art was a major rediscovery that affected all fields of visual culture in the nineteenth century.

Subjects/Keywords: 708; Assyria, British Museum, Musée du Louvre : Nineveh, London, Paris, Nimrud, Khorsabad, Orientalism, Edgar Degas, Auguste Rodin, Simeon Solomon, Arthur Murch, Edward John Poynter, Briton Rivière, Gustave Doré, Edward Armitage, Henry Nelson O'Neil, Frederick Arthur Bridgman, Charles Sargeant Jagger, : Gilbert Ledward, Illustrated London News, Le Monde Illustré, L'Univers Illustré, L'Illustration, Anish Kapoor : Austen Henry Layard, Paul Émile Botta

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Esposito, D. (2011). The artistic discovery of Assyria by Britain and France 1850 to 1950. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Plymouth. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/553

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Esposito, Donato. “The artistic discovery of Assyria by Britain and France 1850 to 1950.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Plymouth. Accessed July 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/553.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Esposito, Donato. “The artistic discovery of Assyria by Britain and France 1850 to 1950.” 2011. Web. 19 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Esposito D. The artistic discovery of Assyria by Britain and France 1850 to 1950. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Plymouth; 2011. [cited 2019 Jul 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/553.

Council of Science Editors:

Esposito D. The artistic discovery of Assyria by Britain and France 1850 to 1950. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Plymouth; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/553

2. Gilman, Daniel. The Acoustics of Abolition: Recovering the Evangelical Anti–Slave Trade Discourse Through Late-Eighteenth-Century Sermons, Hymns, and Prayers .

Degree: 2013, University of Ottawa

This thesis explores the late-eighteenth-century movement to end Britain’s transatlantic slave trade through recovering one of the major discourses in favour of abolition, namely that of the evangelical Anglicans. This important intellectual milieu has often been ignored in academia and is discovered through examining the sermons, hymns, and prayers of three influential leaders in this movement: Member of Parliament William Wilberforce, pastor and hymn writer John Newton, and pastor and professor Charles Simeon. Their oral texts reveal that at the heart of their discourse lies the doctrine of Atonement. On this foundation these abolitionists primarily built a vocabulary not of human rights, but of public duty. This duty was both to care for the destitute as individuals and to protect their nation as a whole because they believed that God was the defender of the enslaved and that he would bring providential judgement on those nations that ignored their plight. For the British evangelicals, abolishing the slave trade was not merely a means to avoid impending judgement, but also part of a broader project to prepare the way for Jesus’s imminent return through advancing the work of reconciliation between humankind and God as they believed themselves to be confronting evil in all of its forms. By reconfiguring the evangelical abolitionist arguments within their religious framework and social contexts, this thesis helps overcome the dissonance that separates our world from theirs and makes accessible the eighteenth-century abolitionist discourse of a campaign that continues to resonate with human rights activists and scholars of social change in the twenty-first-century.

Subjects/Keywords: William Wilberforce; Abolition; Human rights; Slave Trade; Charles Simeon; John Newton; Evangelicalism; Nineteenth Century England; Eighteenth Century England; Slavery; History; Social Change; Abolitionists; Antislavery; Theology; Antislavery movements; Anglicanism; Gospel; Atonement; Providentialism; Clapham Sect; Evangelical Anglicans; Eschatology; Wilberforce; Great Awakening; John Wesley; Anti-Slave Trade; Act to Abolish the Slave Trade; Amazing Grace; Sermons; Prayers; Hymns; History of sermons; Church; British History; Roger Anstey; Ford K. Brown; Boyd Hilton

…and Cambridge academic Charles Simeon, together with the hymns of John Newton, one of the… …Society for Effecting 26 Arthur Pollard, and Michael Hennell, Charles Simeon (1759–1836… …contrast to the exaltation of human 34 J.I. Packer, “Expository Preaching: Charles Simeon and… …considering how evangelicals heard Scripture. Evangelicalism, in the words of Charles Simeon, upheld… …Therefore, when Charles Simeon quoted passages of Scripture from the pulpit, late-eighteenth… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gilman, D. (2013). The Acoustics of Abolition: Recovering the Evangelical Anti–Slave Trade Discourse Through Late-Eighteenth-Century Sermons, Hymns, and Prayers . (Thesis). University of Ottawa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10393/24055

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gilman, Daniel. “The Acoustics of Abolition: Recovering the Evangelical Anti–Slave Trade Discourse Through Late-Eighteenth-Century Sermons, Hymns, and Prayers .” 2013. Thesis, University of Ottawa. Accessed July 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10393/24055.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gilman, Daniel. “The Acoustics of Abolition: Recovering the Evangelical Anti–Slave Trade Discourse Through Late-Eighteenth-Century Sermons, Hymns, and Prayers .” 2013. Web. 19 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Gilman D. The Acoustics of Abolition: Recovering the Evangelical Anti–Slave Trade Discourse Through Late-Eighteenth-Century Sermons, Hymns, and Prayers . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2013. [cited 2019 Jul 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/24055.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gilman D. The Acoustics of Abolition: Recovering the Evangelical Anti–Slave Trade Discourse Through Late-Eighteenth-Century Sermons, Hymns, and Prayers . [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/24055

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.