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You searched for subject:( Catlins). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Otago

1. Lilley, Kate Aroha. Kahukura: Faunal Exploitation in a Southern New Zealand Context .

Degree: University of Otago

Kahukura lies near the cusp of two distinct but connected regions - Foveaux Strait and the Catlins. The following research examines Kahukura’s site function and faunal exploitation. It explores how Kahukura relates to and compares with other sites in the Catlins and Foveaux Strait, its role in the broader settlement network and how environmental factors have influenced the region’s archaeology. This study uses information from excavations and previous studies at Kahukura. A dense, stratified midden was analysed to establish the faunal resources that were utilised, the practices employed during exploitation and possible chronological changes. Shellfish, particularly hard shore taxa, was the most abundant faunal class and was probably a relatively accessible and stable resource. Fishing was probably the main activity; coastal, demersal fish, commonly caught using baited hooks, were the most abundant, followed by fish commonly caught using lures. Dog, whale and fur seal were exploited, although pinnipeds were less abundant than in earlier Catlins’ sites. Of birds, colonial nesting birds were most commonly caught, while coastal and forest taxa were found in low numbers. Some coastal birds may have been preserved and then consumed elsewhere. Taxa present at Kahukura tended to be most abundant during the warmer months. Few chronological changes were noted. Kahukura’s faunal assemblage was comparable to that at nearby Tokanui, whichwas occupied during a similar period. Rigorous analyses of other large middens in Foveaux Strait and Catlins are scarce. While fish taxa were generally similar to many middens in Foveaux Strait, shallow water taxa were less abundant. Findings from Kahukura are consistent with current theories of settlement and chronology in southern New Zealand. Kahukura’s main occupation phase was relatively brief - sometime during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Like many other sites in the region, it is interpreted as a temporary camp associated with larger sites further north. Occupation was focused on the exploitation of local resources - in this case, coastal fauna. Population depression of valuable taxa eventually forced the abandonment of the region. Advisors/Committee Members: Walter, Richard (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: New Zealand; Archaeology; Archaeozoology; Faunal Exploitation; Catlins; Foveaux Strait; Prehistory; Kahukura

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APA (6th Edition):

Lilley, K. A. (n.d.). Kahukura: Faunal Exploitation in a Southern New Zealand Context . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7442

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No year of publication.

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lilley, Kate Aroha. “Kahukura: Faunal Exploitation in a Southern New Zealand Context .” Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7442.

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No year of publication.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lilley, Kate Aroha. “Kahukura: Faunal Exploitation in a Southern New Zealand Context .” Web. 16 Jan 2021.

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No year of publication.

Vancouver:

Lilley KA. Kahukura: Faunal Exploitation in a Southern New Zealand Context . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7442.

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No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

Lilley KA. Kahukura: Faunal Exploitation in a Southern New Zealand Context . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7442

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No year of publication.


University of Otago

2. McNally, Nathan Colin Wheeler. New Zealand sea lion abundance, demographics and movements in southern New Zealand .

Degree: University of Otago

This study represents the first comprehensive survey of the New Zealand sea lion, Phocarctos hookeri populations at Campbell Island, the first surveys in nearly 30 years at The Snares and the continuation of a monitoring program in the Catlins. The results from each of these study locations, increases the understanding of the population dynamics of the species. Photo-identification and mark recapture techniques were used to obtain a population estimate for male sea lions in the Catlins. There are approximately 63 males, and at least two females. Over the eighteen-month period of this study, July 1997 – January 1999, only five new identifications were made. The population in the Catlins continues to increase, but it appears it will remain a predominantly male non-breeding colony, in the short term at least. Photo-identification and mark recapture techniques were used to study the abundance and demography of sea lions at North East Island, The Snares during autumn 1997 and autumn 1998. In total 118 male sea lions were identified, with 63% of identifiable sea lions from 1997 being resighted in 1998. The population estimates for male sea lions were 234 (95% CI 187 to 293) males in 1997 and 255 (95% CI 187 to 348) males in 1998. The minimum estimate for females was 2 in 1997 and 7 in 1998. A single pup was recorded in 1997, but none in 1998. The Snares, despite records of occasional breeding spread over nearly 100 years, remains a non-breeding colony. Campbell Island is the only major breeding site for sea lions outside of the Auckland Islands. Minimum pup production was estimated at 78 for the 1997/98 breeding season, compared with the only previous estimate of 122 from 1991/92, and represents less than 5% of the total pup production for the species. Sea lions at Campbell Island have a widespread distribution, clumped at the coast with low densities inland. Local concentrations of sea lions were seen at Davis Point, Sandy Bay and both Northeast and Southeast Harbours. Isolated individuals were found up to 1.5km inland and at altitudes >250 m. Breeding females at Campbell Island are generally solitary and give birth inland, in contrast to the highly gregarious colonial rookeries seen on the coasts of the Auckland Islands. This study also presents the confirmation of an annual return migration by adult male sea lions based in Otago to the breeding colonies at the Auckland Islands. Advisors/Committee Members: Dawson, Steve (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: New Zealand sea lion; Phocarctos hookeri; Hooker's; sea lion; Campbell Island; The Snares; abundance; pup; Catlins; marine mammal; conservation; status; population

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McNally, N. C. W. (n.d.). New Zealand sea lion abundance, demographics and movements in southern New Zealand . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5412

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No year of publication.

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McNally, Nathan Colin Wheeler. “New Zealand sea lion abundance, demographics and movements in southern New Zealand .” Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5412.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McNally, Nathan Colin Wheeler. “New Zealand sea lion abundance, demographics and movements in southern New Zealand .” Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Vancouver:

McNally NCW. New Zealand sea lion abundance, demographics and movements in southern New Zealand . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5412.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.

Council of Science Editors:

McNally NCW. New Zealand sea lion abundance, demographics and movements in southern New Zealand . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5412

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
No year of publication.


University of Otago

3. Vieira Avendaño, Carla Catherine. Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park .

Degree: 2012, University of Otago

The New Zealand landmass encompasses a vast diversity of wilderness areas, including fourteen national parks and other conservation lands. These natural environments attract a large number of domestic and international visitors, who consult a many different sources of on-line and printed information before and during their visit. However, these resources are usually designed to suit a generic visitor, and take no account of the different needs and expectation of diverse individuals. In this thesis, I investigate the use of information resources by different users groups as categorized by the Wilderness Perception Scaling (WPS) method. I begin with a review of relevant studies and statistics relating to domestic and international visitors’ experiences of the New Zealand wilderness. I then report on the results of my direct observations of visitors to three destinations, and I discuss the findings that I gathered from surveys that I conducted in two of these locations. This work includes pilot studies of two sites — the Catlins Conservation Park and the Orokonui Ecosanctuary — and a more detailed study of Arthur’s Pass National Park. Following a discussion of my observations and findings, I argue for a redesign of the Department of Conservation (DOC) Website, and I present sketch ideas for a new site that is informed by mobile media interface designs. This work hints at future possibilities for smartphone applications. I conclude that current technologies allow us to address the needs and expectations of different visitors to wilderness areas. Furthermore, I argue that mobile media can enable individuals to create and share, as well as download and use, information resources that address their various and different requirements. I conclude that, if we want younger people to engage with wilderness environments, we should be using the technologies that they are using. Advisors/Committee Members: McGuire, Mark (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: WPS; Wilderness; Perceptions; Smartphone; application; DOC; website; domestic; international; visitors; statistics; tourism; carla; vieira; design; icons; iphone; mobile; socila; network; feedback; sharing; information; experiences; environments; conervation; backpack; iSite; Visitor; Centre; Trampers; Non-Purist; Moderate-Purist; Neutralist-Purist; Strong-Purist; Stankey; Kearsley; Lovelock; Highman; Wolch; Tinsley; Recreation; Orokonui-Ecosanctuary; Catlins; Outdoor-recreation; Klisley; Ho; Carr-Williams; Satisfaction; Arthur's Pass; New Zealand; National Park

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vieira Avendaño, C. C. (2012). Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park . (Masters Thesis). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2548

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vieira Avendaño, Carla Catherine. “Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park .” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Otago. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2548.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vieira Avendaño, Carla Catherine. “Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park .” 2012. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Vieira Avendaño CC. Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park . [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Otago; 2012. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2548.

Council of Science Editors:

Vieira Avendaño CC. Addressing the different information needs of diverse visitors to Arthur’s Pass National Park . [Masters Thesis]. University of Otago; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/2548

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