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You searched for subject:( CDEP). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Adelaide

1. Gordon, Zoe Claire. [EMBARGOED] Reconsidering Aboriginal welfare dependency: The Howard Government years through the lens of Postcolonial theory.

Degree: 2017, University of Adelaide

The Liberal-National Coalition Government led by Prime Minister John Howard (1996 to 2007) brought with it a new approach to Indigenous affairs. At the centre of the Howard Government’s approach sat the concept of Aboriginal welfare dependency. This concept arguably has as much currency within Australian politics today as it did during the Howard years, and yet the Howard Government’s normalisation of the concept of Aboriginal welfare dependency remains relatively under-examined. This thesis fills this gap and critically analyses the Howard Government's development of the concept over its four terms, through the lens of Postcolonial theory. In conjunction with Postcolonial theory, this thesis implements Carol Bacchi’s ‘What's the problem represented to be?’ (WPR) approach to policy analysis, as a way of structuring-in the application of Poststructuralist and Postmodernist insights around the power of ideas. This fruitful though unusual pairing brings together Postcolonial theory’s oppositionary stance towards colonialism in all its various forms, and the streamlined Poststructuralist questioning of Bacchi's highly compatible WPR approach. Using this dual approach, this thesis deconstructs and rethinks the Howard Government's representation of the problem of Aboriginal welfare dependency, with Australia’s ongoing colonial context very much in mind. A clear picture of the problem representation is developed through a close examination of the Howard Government's policy material and public statements. The fate of the successful community-controlled Indigenous employment program – the Community Development Employment Projects (CDEP) scheme – is charted through this process. The implicit assumptions within the Howard Government's representation of the problem of Aboriginal welfare dependency are unpacked, and its neoliberal and colonial origins are traced. A portrait emerges of Aboriginal welfare recipients as failed economic actors, responsible for their own poverty. This thesis then considers how the situation could be read differently. Flaws within the concept of welfare dependency itself are identified, calling into question the usefulness of the concept. It is argued that in employing this flawed concept to explain Aboriginal unemployment, the Howard Government neglected to recognise the ongoing colonial context in Australia, as a problem in its own right, and as a cause of Aboriginal unemployment. In contrast, this thesis highlights how current levels of Aboriginal welfare use are directly related to the historic economic marginalisation of Indigenous people and the imposition of an alien and uncompromising economy (factors which had been ameliorated to a degree by the now dismantled CDEP scheme). By detaching Aboriginal unemployment from this broader colonial context, the Howard Government took a decisive step away from the acknowledgement and redress on which Aboriginal economic security and decolonisation both rely. Advisors/Committee Members: Beasley, Chris (advisor), Johnson, Carol (advisor), School of Social Sciences (school).

Subjects/Keywords: Carol Bacchi; What's the problem represented to be?; CDEP, Community Development Employment Projects; Indigenous policy; Aboriginal affairs; poststructuralism; discourse analysis

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gordon, Z. C. (2017). [EMBARGOED] Reconsidering Aboriginal welfare dependency: The Howard Government years through the lens of Postcolonial theory. (Thesis). University of Adelaide. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2440/117804

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gordon, Zoe Claire. “[EMBARGOED] Reconsidering Aboriginal welfare dependency: The Howard Government years through the lens of Postcolonial theory.” 2017. Thesis, University of Adelaide. Accessed December 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2440/117804.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gordon, Zoe Claire. “[EMBARGOED] Reconsidering Aboriginal welfare dependency: The Howard Government years through the lens of Postcolonial theory.” 2017. Web. 12 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Gordon ZC. [EMBARGOED] Reconsidering Aboriginal welfare dependency: The Howard Government years through the lens of Postcolonial theory. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2017. [cited 2019 Dec 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/117804.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gordon ZC. [EMBARGOED] Reconsidering Aboriginal welfare dependency: The Howard Government years through the lens of Postcolonial theory. [Thesis]. University of Adelaide; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/117804

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Australian National University

2. Fowkes, Lisa. Settler-state ambitions and bureaucratic ritual at the frontiers of the labour market: Indigenous Australians and remote employment services 2011–2017 .

Degree: 2018, Australian National University

This thesis explores how policy is enacted – in this case, the Australian Government’s labour market program for remote unemployed people, initially known as the Remote Jobs and Communities Program (RJCP) and then the Community Development Programme (CDP). It outlines the development and delivery of the program from 2011, when the then Labor Government identified the need for a specific remote employment program, placing the employment participation of remote Indigenous people (who made up over 80% of the remote unemployed) at centre stage. It examines the changes that occurred to the program following the 2013 election of a Coalition Government, including the introduction of ‘continuous’ Work for the Dole. The focus of the thesis is on how patterns of practice have emerged in these programs, in particular: how providers have responded; how frontline workers navigate their roles; and how ‘Work for the Dole’ actually operates. What emerges is a gulf between bureaucratic and political ambitions for these programs and the ways in which participants and frontline workers view and enact them. This is more than a problem of poor implementation or the subversions of street-level bureaucrats and clients. There is evidence of a more fundamental failure of technologies of settler-state government as they are applied to remote Indigenous peoples. On the remote, intercultural frontiers of the labour market, the limits of centralised attempts at ‘reform’ become clear. Practices intended to tutor Indigenous people in the ways of the labour market are emptied of meaning. The Indigenous people who are the targets of governing efforts fail to conform with desired behaviours of ‘self-governing’ citizens, even in the face of escalating penalties. As a result, government ambitions to transform the behaviours and subjectivities of Indigenous people are reduced to bureaucratic rituals, represented in numbers and graphs on computer screens in Canberra.

Subjects/Keywords: Indigenous Affairs; welfare reform; New Public Management; employment services; CDEP; activation; welfare conditionality; performance management; workfare; labour market programs; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders; unemployment; remote; remote employment; Community Development Program

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fowkes, L. (2018). Settler-state ambitions and bureaucratic ritual at the frontiers of the labour market: Indigenous Australians and remote employment services 2011–2017 . (Thesis). Australian National University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1885/160842

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fowkes, Lisa. “Settler-state ambitions and bureaucratic ritual at the frontiers of the labour market: Indigenous Australians and remote employment services 2011–2017 .” 2018. Thesis, Australian National University. Accessed December 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1885/160842.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fowkes, Lisa. “Settler-state ambitions and bureaucratic ritual at the frontiers of the labour market: Indigenous Australians and remote employment services 2011–2017 .” 2018. Web. 12 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Fowkes L. Settler-state ambitions and bureaucratic ritual at the frontiers of the labour market: Indigenous Australians and remote employment services 2011–2017 . [Internet] [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/160842.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Fowkes L. Settler-state ambitions and bureaucratic ritual at the frontiers of the labour market: Indigenous Australians and remote employment services 2011–2017 . [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/160842

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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