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You searched for subject:( Boothia). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Queens University

1. Atkinson, David M. Modelling Biophysical Variables and Carbon Dioxide Exchange in Arctic Tundra Landscapes using High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Data .

Degree: Geography, 2013, Queens University

Vegetation community patterns and processes are indicators and integrators of climate. Recently, scientists have shown that climate change is most pronounced in circumpolar regions. Arctic ecosystems have traditionally been sequestering carbon and accumulating large carbon stores. However, given enhanced warming in the Arctic, the potential exists for intensified global climate change if these ecosystems transition from sinks to sources of atmospheric CO2. In the Mid and High Arctic, ecosystems exhibit extreme levels of spatial heterogeneity, particularly at landscape scales. High spatial-resolution (e.g., 4m) remote sensing data capture heterogeneous vegetation patterns of the Arctic landscape and have the potential to model ecosystem biophysical properties and CO2 fluxes. The following conditions are required to model arctic ecosystem processes: (i) unique spectral signatures that correspond to variations in the landscape pattern; (ii) models that transform remote sensing data into derivative values pertaining to the landscape; and (iii) field measures of the variables to calibrate and validate the models. First, this research creates an ecosystem classification scheme through ordination, clustering, and spectral-separability of ground cover data to generate ecologically meaningful and spectrally distinct image classifications. Classifications had overall accuracies between 69% - 79% and Kappa values of 0.54 - 0.69. Secondly, biophysical variable models of percent vegetation cover, aboveground biomass, and soil moisture are calibrated and validated using a k-fold cross-validation linear bivariate regression methodology. Percent vegetation cover and percent soil moisture produce the strongest and most consistent results (r2 ≥ 0.84 and 0.73) across both study sites. Finally, in situ CO2 exchange rate data, an NDVI model for each component flux, which explains between 42% and 95% of the variation at each site, is generated. Analysis of coincidence indicates that a single model for each component flux can be applied, independent of site. This research begins to fill a gap in the application of high spatial-resolution remote sensing data for modelling Arctic ecosystem biophysical variables and carbon dioxide exchange, particularly in the Canadian Arctic. The results of this research also indicate high levels of functional convergence in ecosystem-level structure and function within Arctic landscapes.

Subjects/Keywords: IKONOS; Arctic; Cape Bounty; Boothia; Remote Sensing; Nunavut; Biomass; Tundra Vegetation; Carbon Flux

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Atkinson, D. M. (2013). Modelling Biophysical Variables and Carbon Dioxide Exchange in Arctic Tundra Landscapes using High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Data . (Thesis). Queens University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1974/7709

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Atkinson, David M. “Modelling Biophysical Variables and Carbon Dioxide Exchange in Arctic Tundra Landscapes using High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Data .” 2013. Thesis, Queens University. Accessed December 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1974/7709.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Atkinson, David M. “Modelling Biophysical Variables and Carbon Dioxide Exchange in Arctic Tundra Landscapes using High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Data .” 2013. Web. 12 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Atkinson DM. Modelling Biophysical Variables and Carbon Dioxide Exchange in Arctic Tundra Landscapes using High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Data . [Internet] [Thesis]. Queens University; 2013. [cited 2019 Dec 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/7709.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Atkinson DM. Modelling Biophysical Variables and Carbon Dioxide Exchange in Arctic Tundra Landscapes using High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing Data . [Thesis]. Queens University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/7709

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Western Ontario

2. Ozyer, Carl. Ice-movement history and kimberlite indicator mineral dispersal study, Pelly Bay, lower Boothia Peninsula, and Wager Plateau areas, Nunavut, Canada.

Degree: 2011, University of Western Ontario

This study reconstructs the ice flow history of the eastern portion of the Keewatin sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet by integrating field work, remote imagery, and work by others. The study reveals at least seven ice flow phases during the Wisconsinan, including ice streams. A model was developed using inverse distance weighed (IDW) interpolation with GIS to identify and isolate potential kimberlite bedrock sources in kimberlite indicator mineral-rich areas in the Pelly Bay area, Nunavut. Kimberlite indicator mineral (KIM) data were normalized by “peer size” to better understand how KIM grains from three kimberlite sources are distributed within three size fractions of till. The IDW method successfully delineated previously unrecognized KIM dispersal trains that were hidden within the KIM-rich areas. The study also revealed that garnets reached their terminal grade at relatively short distances (2500-7500 m) down ice from their kimberlite sources. Mg-ilmenite is the dominant KIM in the area and Mg-ilmenite-rich samples tend to contain Cr-pyrope and orange garnets, with lesser Cr-diopside and chromite. Mg-olivine in these samples ranges from abundant to none. Mg-olivine-rich KIM in till is associated with the Umingmak kimberlites.

Subjects/Keywords: GIS; IDW; KIM; Laurentide Ice Sheet; Keewatin Ice Divide; M’Clintock Channel; Inverse Distance Weighted; kimberlite indicator minerals; dispersal train; ice stream; Wager Plateau; Boothia Peninsula; Chantrey; Pelly Bay; Nunavut; Geochemistry; Geology; Glaciology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ozyer, C. (2011). Ice-movement history and kimberlite indicator mineral dispersal study, Pelly Bay, lower Boothia Peninsula, and Wager Plateau areas, Nunavut, Canada. (Thesis). University of Western Ontario. Retrieved from https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/226

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ozyer, Carl. “Ice-movement history and kimberlite indicator mineral dispersal study, Pelly Bay, lower Boothia Peninsula, and Wager Plateau areas, Nunavut, Canada.” 2011. Thesis, University of Western Ontario. Accessed December 12, 2019. https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/226.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ozyer, Carl. “Ice-movement history and kimberlite indicator mineral dispersal study, Pelly Bay, lower Boothia Peninsula, and Wager Plateau areas, Nunavut, Canada.” 2011. Web. 12 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Ozyer C. Ice-movement history and kimberlite indicator mineral dispersal study, Pelly Bay, lower Boothia Peninsula, and Wager Plateau areas, Nunavut, Canada. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2011. [cited 2019 Dec 12]. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/226.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ozyer C. Ice-movement history and kimberlite indicator mineral dispersal study, Pelly Bay, lower Boothia Peninsula, and Wager Plateau areas, Nunavut, Canada. [Thesis]. University of Western Ontario; 2011. Available from: https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/226

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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