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You searched for subject:( Blackcurrants). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Massey University

1. McKenzie, Olivia. The amelioration of the impact of physical fatigue on cognitive performance by phytochemicals.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2016, Massey University

Fatigue is common in everyday life. It is experienced as either cognitive or physical fatigue, both of which are intertwined. Researchers are interested in investigating the ability of phytochemical supplementation to improve cognitive performance by diminishing the effects of physical fatigue. The results thus far have been highly inconsistent (Brisswalter & Arcelin, 1997). The present study examined the effects of phytochemical supplementation utilising a daily dose of 240 mg of blackcurrant extract, a berry fruit high in phytochemicals but under-researched compared to other berry fruits, such as blueberries. Fifty healthy participants completed two 3-hour trials, the first during Week 1 and the second 6 weeks later. Half of the participants were randomly assigned to the blackcurrant supplement group, the supplement being consumed each day over the 6-week period. Each trial consisted of five cognitive tests followed by a tailored HIIT cycle test. The purpose of the HIIT was to induce physical fatigue and took less than 10 min overall. Cognitive tasks and mood questionnaires were completed pre and post consumption of the supplement at both Week 1 and Week 6. Participants received the blackcurrant supplement 1 hour before post task measurements were completed. Analyses demonstrated that the blackcurrant supplementation had no influence on cognitive performance. However, it is questionable as to whether the degree of physical fatigue induced was sufficient to negatively influence cognitive performance, even though previous studies had found it to be so. Overall, it was concluded that blackcurrant supplementation taken across 6 weeks did not facilitate cognitive performance after physical fatigue. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed, including ways for future research to move forward.

Subjects/Keywords: Phytochemicals; Blackcurrants; Physiological effect; Cognition; Fatigue

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McKenzie, O. (2016). The amelioration of the impact of physical fatigue on cognitive performance by phytochemicals. (Masters Thesis). Massey University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10179/11490

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McKenzie, Olivia. “The amelioration of the impact of physical fatigue on cognitive performance by phytochemicals.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Massey University. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10179/11490.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McKenzie, Olivia. “The amelioration of the impact of physical fatigue on cognitive performance by phytochemicals.” 2016. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

McKenzie O. The amelioration of the impact of physical fatigue on cognitive performance by phytochemicals. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Massey University; 2016. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/11490.

Council of Science Editors:

McKenzie O. The amelioration of the impact of physical fatigue on cognitive performance by phytochemicals. [Masters Thesis]. Massey University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/11490


Massey University

2. Ratlidge, Rebecca. Mitigation of the impact of cognitive fatigue on simple motor performance by phytochemicals : the effect of a blackcurrant supplement.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2014, Massey University

Cognitive fatigue can be brought on by prolonged periods of demanding cognitive activity which has been found to impair both cognitive and physical performance. Phytochemical supplementation can result in improvements in both cognitive and physical performance. However, the ability for phytochemical supplementation to reduce the effects cognitive fatigue has on subsequent physical performance has not been investigated. Therefore, the present study examined the effects that phytochemicals from a blackcurrant supplement had in reducing the effects of cognitive fatigue on simple motor performance. Sixty healthy participants completed 75 minutes of a vigilance task (cognitive fatigue) or 75 minutes of watching an emotionally neutral documentary (control). Half of the participants in each condition also received a blackcurrant supplement (3.2mg/kg) 1 hour before beginning the experimental session. Following the 75 minutes of time-on-task participants completed mood and motivation questionnaires as well as four motor tasks. Analyses revealed the vigilance task was successful in inducing cognitive fatigue, but this had little effect on subsequent motor performance compared to controls. Further analyses revealed the blackcurrant supplement had little influence on either cognitive or motor performance, although the lack of an effect of cognitive fatigue on motor performance made this finding difficult to interpret. Effect size calculations indicated that a larger sample would have likely resulted in statistically significant findings for the majority of the motor tasks. It is concluded that for the specific tasks used in the present study, cognitive fatigue did not impair subsequent motor performance. Nor did the blackcurrant supplement, at the dose used, enhance motor performance following cognitive fatigue. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed and some potentially useful future studies outlined.

Subjects/Keywords: Phytochemicals; Blackcurrants; Physiological effect; Movement, Psychology of; Mental fatigue; Cognition; Research Subject Categories::SOCIAL SCIENCES::Social sciences::Psychology::Cognitive science

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ratlidge, R. (2014). Mitigation of the impact of cognitive fatigue on simple motor performance by phytochemicals : the effect of a blackcurrant supplement. (Masters Thesis). Massey University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10179/12245

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ratlidge, Rebecca. “Mitigation of the impact of cognitive fatigue on simple motor performance by phytochemicals : the effect of a blackcurrant supplement.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Massey University. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10179/12245.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ratlidge, Rebecca. “Mitigation of the impact of cognitive fatigue on simple motor performance by phytochemicals : the effect of a blackcurrant supplement.” 2014. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Ratlidge R. Mitigation of the impact of cognitive fatigue on simple motor performance by phytochemicals : the effect of a blackcurrant supplement. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Massey University; 2014. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/12245.

Council of Science Editors:

Ratlidge R. Mitigation of the impact of cognitive fatigue on simple motor performance by phytochemicals : the effect of a blackcurrant supplement. [Masters Thesis]. Massey University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10179/12245


Lincoln University

3. Scott, R. R. A study of the biology and population dynamics of Synanthedon tipuliformis (Clerck) (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) in Canterbury, New Zealand.

Degree: 1975, Lincoln University

The study covered the period August 1971 to February 1975 and was conducted in three blackcurrant plots. One plot comprised mature bushes that were pruned but not sprayed during the course of the study; the other two plots were subject to full normal managerial practices including spraying. Information on various aspects of the biology was revealed and this clarified some of the areas about which little was known previously especially for the Southern Hemisphere. Fecundity is 100 eggs per female, fertility in the field is at least 97% and predation of eggs is always less than 5%. There are six larval instars. Fungi of the genera Beauveria and Cordyceps cause up to 10% mortality of the larvae. This is the first record of the latter genus infecting S. tipuliformis. A sampling plan was developed to enable estimates of the population of S. tipuliformis at various stages to be obtained. This gave information on the distribution of stages of the life cycle within the canes according to the age of the wood. These samples also permitted the construction of life tables for three generations of S. tipuliformis in one plot and one generation in the others. Replication both in space and time was therefore achieved and the results were further replicated by considering each plot as nine separate blocks. The dispersion of the egg and larval stages was tested and found to fit the negative binomial model. A common k, kc, was calculated for the egg stage and the larval c stage. Though not vital to this present study various transformations of the raw data were investigated to see which were most appropriate in order to stabilise the variance for analyses in which such suitability is vital. The logarithmic transformation based on the k parameter of the k negative model [log (x + k/2)) was the most successful. The mortality of the eggs was quite low but a significant proportion of the emerging larvae fail to colonise the pith of a cane. This mortality is density dependent. Other mortalities including winter pruning are density independent or random. The key stage of the life cycle revealed by the life tables is the adult survival. This survival and the consequent population trend index determined from the number of eggs laid was found to be affected by the prevailing weather during the flight period especially during the last week of November and the first two weeks of December. Advisors/Committee Members: Harrison, R. A., Penman, D. R..

Subjects/Keywords: current clearwing; Synanthedon tipuliformis; blackcurrants; Ribes nigrum L.; pruning; infestation; pith-boring; sampling; population dynamics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Scott, R. R. (1975). A study of the biology and population dynamics of Synanthedon tipuliformis (Clerck) (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) in Canterbury, New Zealand. (Thesis). Lincoln University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10182/1861

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Scott, R R. “A study of the biology and population dynamics of Synanthedon tipuliformis (Clerck) (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) in Canterbury, New Zealand.” 1975. Thesis, Lincoln University. Accessed July 09, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10182/1861.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Scott, R R. “A study of the biology and population dynamics of Synanthedon tipuliformis (Clerck) (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) in Canterbury, New Zealand.” 1975. Web. 09 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Scott RR. A study of the biology and population dynamics of Synanthedon tipuliformis (Clerck) (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) in Canterbury, New Zealand. [Internet] [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1975. [cited 2020 Jul 09]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/1861.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Scott RR. A study of the biology and population dynamics of Synanthedon tipuliformis (Clerck) (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) in Canterbury, New Zealand. [Thesis]. Lincoln University; 1975. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10182/1861

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.