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You searched for subject:( Bali bombing). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Australian National University

1. Hollow, Rosemary. How nations mourn:the memorialisation and management of contemporary atrocity sites .

Degree: 2010, Australian National University

Terrorism and atrocities have scarred the public memory in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Three atrocities, the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, the 1996 massacre at Port Arthur Historic Site in Tasmania, Australia, and the 2002 Bali bombings, had a significant impact on the communities they most affected. How did the differing governments and communities at these sites respond to the sudden loss of life? How were the competing agendas of these groups managed ? Are there shared and distinctive characteristics in the memorialisation of atrocitites across these countries at the turn of the millenium? In responding to these questions, this study analyses cultural differences in memorialisation at contemporary atrocity sites. It examines the differing responses at the case study sites to the planning and the timing of memorials, the engagement of those affected, the memorial designs and the management of the memorials, including tributes. It is an original comparative study of contemporary memorialisation by a heritage professional directly involved in the management of memorials at contemporary atrocity sites. The original research includes the identification of the role the internet in contemporary memorialisation, an in-depth analysis of the memorialisation of the 1996 massacre at Port Arthur Historic Site, and the memorialisation in Bali and across Australia of the 2002 Bali bombings. It extends the current scholarship on the memorialisation of the Oklahoma City bombing through identifying the impact of the internet in the memorialisation and in the timeframe of the analysis through to the 15th anniversary in 2010. The comparative analysis of the management of tributes at all the sites identified issues not previously considered in Australian scholarship: that tributes and the response to them is part of the memorialisation and management of contemporary atrocity sites. A combined research method based on an interpretive social science approach was adopted. A range of methodogies were used, including literature reviews, analysis of electronic material, site visits, unstructured in-depth interviews, and participant-observation at memorial services. Studies on history, memory and memorialisation provided the framework for my analysis and led to an original proposal, that all three sites have shared histories of the memorialisation of war and ‘missing’ memorialisation. These shared histories, I argue, strengthened the justification for this comparative study. This comparative study identified differences across the case study countries in the designs of the built memorials, in legislation enacted after the atrocities, the responses to the perpetrators, the marking of anniversaries, and in the management of tributes left at the sites. These…

Subjects/Keywords: Port Arthur Historic Site; Port Arthur massacre; Port Arthur 1996; Huon Pine Cross; Port Arthur anniversary services; interpretation of massacres; interpretation of difficult stories; tributes; offerings at memorials; spontaneous memorials; Martin Bryant; Gun control; National Firearms Agreement; Oklahoma City; Oklahoma City bombing; Oklahoma City 1995; Oklahoma City National Memorial; World Trade Centre; September 11 2001; 9/11; World Trade Centre Memorial; Vietnam Veterans Memorial; Bali bombings; 2002 Bali bombings; Kuta bombings; Bali memorials; Kuta Memorial; Bali memorials in Australia; war memorials in Bali; terrorism; history and memory; tributes; offerings at memorials; dark tourism; memorials; massacre sites; internet and memorials; war memorials; roadside memorials; online memorials; memorial museums; commemoration; traumascapes; cultural memory

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hollow, R. (2010). How nations mourn:the memorialisation and management of contemporary atrocity sites . (Thesis). Australian National University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1885/105353

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hollow, Rosemary. “How nations mourn:the memorialisation and management of contemporary atrocity sites .” 2010. Thesis, Australian National University. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1885/105353.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hollow, Rosemary. “How nations mourn:the memorialisation and management of contemporary atrocity sites .” 2010. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Hollow R. How nations mourn:the memorialisation and management of contemporary atrocity sites . [Internet] [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2010. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/105353.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hollow R. How nations mourn:the memorialisation and management of contemporary atrocity sites . [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/105353

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Crofts, Stephen. Australian press constructions of the 2002 Bali bombing: differing imaginings of the nation and its place in the world.

Degree: School of Communication and Arts, 2015, University of Queensland

Subjects/Keywords: Australian print journalism; Textual analysis; Bali bombing; Discourse; Nation; Tabloid; Broadsheet; 2001 Communication and Media Studies

…viii Keywords Australian print journalism, textual analysis, Bali bombing, discourse… …Table 2: Content analysis of news, features and images on the Bali bombing, the Daily… …Table 1: Content analysis of news, features and images on the Bali bombing, the Daily… …features and images on the Bali bombing, the Daily Telegraph, the Sydney Morning Herald and the… …questions are: how do the three newspapers construct the 2002 Bali bombing; and how does their… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Crofts, S. (2015). Australian press constructions of the 2002 Bali bombing: differing imaginings of the nation and its place in the world. (Thesis). University of Queensland. Retrieved from http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:356725

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Crofts, Stephen. “Australian press constructions of the 2002 Bali bombing: differing imaginings of the nation and its place in the world.” 2015. Thesis, University of Queensland. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:356725.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Crofts, Stephen. “Australian press constructions of the 2002 Bali bombing: differing imaginings of the nation and its place in the world.” 2015. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Crofts S. Australian press constructions of the 2002 Bali bombing: differing imaginings of the nation and its place in the world. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Queensland; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:356725.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Crofts S. Australian press constructions of the 2002 Bali bombing: differing imaginings of the nation and its place in the world. [Thesis]. University of Queensland; 2015. Available from: http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:356725

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Australian National University

3. Hess, Martin Christopher. The Australian Federal Police as an International Actor: Diplomacy by Default .

Degree: 2018, Australian National University

Under traditional International relations theory, diplomacy relates to relations between sovereign nations. There have been two broad schools of thought on the dynamics behind these relations: the ‘realist’ school, which tends to consider power and conflict as the major lens through which such should be viewed, and the ‘idealist’ school which tended to focus on cooperation rather than conflict. Between these two extreme views, a third school, the English School of International Relations, also known as the British Institutionalists, provides somewhat of a compromise view, acknowledging the merit of both realism and idealism, by accepting that power remains an important element but also advocating that acceptance of common norms and institutions plays a significant role in determining relations, or the International Society between states. In 1977 Hedley Bull offered the following definition of International Society when he stated that International Society … exists when a group of states, conscious of certain common interests and common values, form a society in the sense that they conceive themselves to be bound by a common set of rules in their relations with one another, and share in the working of common institutions. This thesis is not specifically related to International Relations theory, which deals with inter-state relations. Whilst inter-state conflict and international relations remain important drivers of foreign and military policy, there is a growing recognition that it is intra-state conflict avoidance and post-conflict reconstruction which increasingly mitigate the risk to the safety, security, peace and prosperity of nations and regions. Much of this disquiet has its roots in maladministration, poor governance and a lack of justice. These are areas in which traditional approaches to foreign intervention via trade, aid and military force have limited effect, and in which effective consent-based policing and justice can play a significant part in building sustainable and peaceful outcomes. This thesis discusses the role played by a non-traditional actor in the international arena, the police, specifically the Australian Federal Police (AFP), in addressing some of these intra-state justice and governance issues in a constantly changing, unstable and unpredictable global and regional environment. The thesis is intended to outline the diversity and versatility of AFP activities and to contextualise them in terms of non-traditional New Diplomacy. The aspects of diplomacy of most significance relate to diplomatic qualities or traits of the individual police officer, diplomatic behaviours of these members, and diplomatic outcomes of their activities. As such the thesis does not relate directly to International Relations theory or to International Society, as espoused by Hedley…

Subjects/Keywords: Liberal democratic policing; Commonwealth Police; Australian Federal Police; AFP; diplomacy; police liaison; peacekeeping; police capacity development; Diplomacy by Default; international police cooperation; International Deployment Group; IDG; United Nations Force in Cyprus; UNFICYP; United Nations Mission to East Timor; UNAMET; Bali bombing; Operational Alliance; Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands; RAMSI; Operation Helpem Fren; Papua New Guinea-Australia Policing Partnership; PNG-APP; Operation Wok Wantaim; Vanuatu Australia Police Partnership; VAPP; Samoa Australia Police Partnership; SAPP; Tonga Police Development Program; TPDP; Timor Leste Police Development Program; TLTDP; Operational Illuminate; Afghanistan; Counter Insurgency Policing; COIN; Malayan Emergency; Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17; Ukraine; Operation Arew; INTERPOL; United Nations Security Council; UN Resolution 2151; UN Resolution 2185; whole of government cooperation; inter agency cooperation; joined up government; ASEANAPOL; Pacific Islands Forum; Pacific Islands Chiefs of Police

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hess, M. C. (2018). The Australian Federal Police as an International Actor: Diplomacy by Default . (Thesis). Australian National University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1885/144278

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hess, Martin Christopher. “The Australian Federal Police as an International Actor: Diplomacy by Default .” 2018. Thesis, Australian National University. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1885/144278.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hess, Martin Christopher. “The Australian Federal Police as an International Actor: Diplomacy by Default .” 2018. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Hess MC. The Australian Federal Police as an International Actor: Diplomacy by Default . [Internet] [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/144278.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hess MC. The Australian Federal Police as an International Actor: Diplomacy by Default . [Thesis]. Australian National University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1885/144278

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.