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You searched for subject:( Aamjiwnaang). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Ryerson University

1. Butet-Roch, Laurence. Virtual Aamjiwnaang: Indigenous interactive storytelling.

Degree: 2016, Ryerson University

Stories shape how we understand ourselves and the world around us. They inform our sense of belonging, and connect us to our past. Stories are our lives. And we are our stories. Given their undeniable weight, we ought to question what their form and content teaches us. Increasingly, stories are shared as interactive digital experiences; a reshaping that impacts their configuration, their reach and their outcome. For Indigenous peoples, who continue to resist the colonial paradigm, digital storytelling can represent a weapon of subtle yet pervasive colonialism or be a tool to talk back. Virtual Aamjiwnaang is an interactive platform that integrates Indigenous storytelling practices in recounting the lived realities of the Aamjiwnaang First Nation online. Inspired by the Two-Eyed Seeing approach, which encourages embracing multiple perspectives, and building on previous digital experiences, Virtual Aamjiwnaang proposes methods for creating digital territories that honour Indigenous ways of knowing.

Subjects/Keywords: Digital storytelling; Oral communications  – Digital techniques; Storytelling  – Computer network resources; Interactive multimedia; Aamjiwnaang First Nation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Butet-Roch, L. (2016). Virtual Aamjiwnaang: Indigenous interactive storytelling. (Thesis). Ryerson University. Retrieved from https://digital.library.ryerson.ca/islandora/object/RULA%3A5644

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Butet-Roch, Laurence. “Virtual Aamjiwnaang: Indigenous interactive storytelling.” 2016. Thesis, Ryerson University. Accessed December 12, 2019. https://digital.library.ryerson.ca/islandora/object/RULA%3A5644.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Butet-Roch, Laurence. “Virtual Aamjiwnaang: Indigenous interactive storytelling.” 2016. Web. 12 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Butet-Roch L. Virtual Aamjiwnaang: Indigenous interactive storytelling. [Internet] [Thesis]. Ryerson University; 2016. [cited 2019 Dec 12]. Available from: https://digital.library.ryerson.ca/islandora/object/RULA%3A5644.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Butet-Roch L. Virtual Aamjiwnaang: Indigenous interactive storytelling. [Thesis]. Ryerson University; 2016. Available from: https://digital.library.ryerson.ca/islandora/object/RULA%3A5644

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Wiebe, Sarah. Anatomy of Place: Ecological Citizenship in Canada's Chemical Valley .

Degree: 2013, University of Ottawa

Citizens of the Aamjiwnaang First Nation fight for justice with their bodies at the frontlines of environmental catastrophe. This dissertation employs a biopolitical and interpretive analysis to examine these struggles in the polluted heart of Canada’s ‘Chemical Valley’. Drawing from a discursive analysis of situated concerns on the ground and a textual analysis of Canada’s biopolitical ‘policy ensemble’ for Indigenous citizenship, this dissertation examines how citizens and public officials respond to environmental and reproductive injustices in Aamjiwnaang. Based upon in-depth interviews with residents and policy-makers, I first document citizens of the Aamjiwnaang First Nation’s activities and practices on the ground as they cope with and navigate their health concerns and habitat. Second, I examine struggles over knowledge and the contestation over scientific expertise as the community seeks reproductive justice. Third, I contextualize citizen struggles over knowledge by discussing the power relations embedded within the ‘policy ensemble’ for Indigenous citizenship and Canadian jurisdiction for on-reserve environmental health. From an interpretive lens, inspired by Foucault’s concepts of biopower and governmentality, the dissertation develops a framework of “ecological citizenship”, which confronts biopolitics with a theoretical discussion of place to expand upon existing Canadian citizenship and environmental studies literature. I argue that reproductive justice in Aamjiwnaang cannot be separated from environmental justice, and that the concept of place is central to ongoing struggles. As such, I discuss “ecological citizenship’s double-edge”, to contend that citizens are at once bound up within disciplinary biopolitical power relations and also articulate a radical form of place-based belonging.

Subjects/Keywords: Ecological citizenship; Biopolitics; Governmentality; Place; Environmental justice; Reproductive justice; Aamjiwnaang; Chemical Valley; Interpretive research methods; Political ethnography

…on the Aamjiwnaang First Nation reserve during the summer of 1992. The evacuation included… …in Aamjiwnaang live in a perpetual state of alert. The following year, a Suncor toluene… …Aamjiwnaang residents (McCaffery, 1993). In response, Police Chief Murray McMaster claimed… …airways as Aamjiwnaang citizens safeguard their land and life. Fast-forward over a decade later… …Children, staff and supporters of the Aamjiwnaang Binoojiinyag Kino Maagewgamgoons day care took… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wiebe, S. (2013). Anatomy of Place: Ecological Citizenship in Canada's Chemical Valley . (Thesis). University of Ottawa. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10393/26187

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wiebe, Sarah. “Anatomy of Place: Ecological Citizenship in Canada's Chemical Valley .” 2013. Thesis, University of Ottawa. Accessed December 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10393/26187.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wiebe, Sarah. “Anatomy of Place: Ecological Citizenship in Canada's Chemical Valley .” 2013. Web. 12 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Wiebe S. Anatomy of Place: Ecological Citizenship in Canada's Chemical Valley . [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2013. [cited 2019 Dec 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/26187.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Wiebe S. Anatomy of Place: Ecological Citizenship in Canada's Chemical Valley . [Thesis]. University of Ottawa; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/26187

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Hobbs, Peter David. Chemical Intimacies and Toxic Publics.

Degree: PhD, Environmental Studies, 2017, York University

In this dissertation, I detail how capitalism has turned pollution into a generally accepted form of violence perpetuated in the name of economic health. Complete with a corps of risk managers and environmental consultants, neoliberal capitalism has fashioned pollution into a universal standard that functions as an ambient form of socialization. Pollution, I contend, serves as a social apparatus, an atmospheric example of what Jacques Rancire refers to as distributing the sensible (2004). Instead of being simply a by-product or unavoidable consequence, pollution serves as a constant reminder of the production/flow of capital and of modernitys dependency on heavy industries. But beyond its obvious emissions, spills, dumps, and tailing ponds, much of the fallout of pollution remains hidden. Thus, in mapping the social significance of pollution, the dissertation stresses these two conflicting principles: pollution is constantly present but also invisible. Pollution exists in the form of microscopic particles that travel on the wind and in waterways, penetrating ecosystems, neighbourhoods, homes, and bodies so that people are exposed to its poisons as a matter of fact, as a condition of the everyday, as an emblem of ones modernity. To counter this general acceptance of pollution, I engage in an ecological storytelling that utilizes comic book imagery, along with a mixture of archival and everyday material (government reports, tourist guides, newspaper clippings, postcards, and childrens drawings), to situate the specific harm done by the ambient toxins, chemicals emitted from specific polluting industries and imposed on specific people and ecologies. I concentrate on two ethnographic sites and two polluting industries, as half of the dissertation examines the politics of lead in Toronto (tracing its historical influence and public acceptance in two working class neighbourhoods), while the other half focuses on a massive petrochemical corridor that is located in and around the small city of Sarnia (in southwestern Ontario) and immediately adjacent to the First Nation of Aamjiwnaang. In addition to the more traditional ethnographic methods adopted in the textual chapters, the comics provide a stream of countermemories that refute neoliberal capitalism and its demand for more of the same. Advisors/Committee Members: Sandilands, Cate (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Environmental philosophy; Environmental studies; Environmental justices; Biopolitics; Toxins; Capitalism; Neoliberalism; Lead poisoning; Petroleum; Cosmopolitics; Walter Benjamin; Aamjiwnaang; Sarnia; South Riverdale; Toronto; Niagara; Lead refineries; Pollution; Citizen science; Ecological storytelling; Jaques Ranciere; Donna Haraway; White Noise; Comic books; Ethnography; Chemical Valley; Ecological activism; Community activism; Bruno Latour; Karen Barad; Agential realism; Assemblage; Actor Network Theory; Michel Foucault; Cate Sandilands; Michelle Murphy; Natasha Myers; Feminist science studies; Science studies; Dissensus; Creative methodologies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hobbs, P. D. (2017). Chemical Intimacies and Toxic Publics. (Doctoral Dissertation). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/33425

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hobbs, Peter David. “Chemical Intimacies and Toxic Publics.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, York University. Accessed December 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/33425.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hobbs, Peter David. “Chemical Intimacies and Toxic Publics.” 2017. Web. 12 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Hobbs PD. Chemical Intimacies and Toxic Publics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. York University; 2017. [cited 2019 Dec 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/33425.

Council of Science Editors:

Hobbs PD. Chemical Intimacies and Toxic Publics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. York University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/33425

.