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You searched for id:"oai:openprairie.sdstate.edu:etd-2125". One record found.

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1. Olson, Kristin L. Let Them Eat Beef: Effects of Beef Consumption on Markers of Metabolic Syndrome.

Degree: MS, Health and Nutritional Sciences, 2017, South Dakota State University

To determine the effects of a diet that provides 30% energy from protein with ½ as lean, red meat on risk factors of metabolic syndrome in humans. This pilot study was a 3- month, randomized, control, intervention trial with 33 participants (Beef-Intervention n=18; DASH-Control n=15) who displayed markers of metabolic syndrome. Registered Dietitians Nutritionists recruited and educated participants on Beef-Intervention Lean Beef Pattern, (30% of energy from protein with ½ as lean red meat, 40% carbohydrate, 30% fat) or DASH-Control dietary pattern, (15% of energy from protein, 55% carbohydrate and 30 % fat). Of the 33 participants who completed the study; 21 were female and 12 male. Bodyweight (BW), fasting serum lipoproteins [total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TG)], hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C), dietary satisfaction, and general health status were assessed at baseline and post intervention. A three-day diet journal was collected to assess for calorie and macronutrient intake at baseline and post intervention. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine group differences from baseline to post-intervention. Variables were checked for normality and non-normal variables were transformed prior to analysis. Statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. There were no significant changes in total cholesterol, LDL-C, and HDL-C. There was a significant time x group effect for TG (baseline to post; Beef-Intervention 207±88mg/dL to 148±53; DASH-Control, 200±88 to 193±96.) Both groups had decreased BW and HbA1c from baseline to post. Both groups reported a higher level of current dietary satisfaction, a higher level of general health, increased walking minutes & total increases in physical activity minutes. Lipid parameters, BW, and HbA1C of participants with metabolic syndrome randomized to the Beef-Intervention promoting 30% energy from protein with ½ as lean, red meat had outcomes that were similar or improved to those randomized to DASH-Control diet. The implication is, although larger studies in greater numbers still need to be done, that the inclusion of LRM in calorie-reduced diets may be used short term as an alternative to the DASH diet for those with MetS for weight and TG reduction. Advisors/Committee Members: Kendra K. Kattelmann.

Subjects/Keywords: beef; DASH; metabolic syndrome; Dietetics and Clinical Nutrition; Nutrition

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Olson, K. L. (2017). Let Them Eat Beef: Effects of Beef Consumption on Markers of Metabolic Syndrome. (Masters Thesis). South Dakota State University. Retrieved from http://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/1124

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Olson, Kristin L. “Let Them Eat Beef: Effects of Beef Consumption on Markers of Metabolic Syndrome.” 2017. Masters Thesis, South Dakota State University. Accessed August 20, 2017. http://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/1124.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Olson, Kristin L. “Let Them Eat Beef: Effects of Beef Consumption on Markers of Metabolic Syndrome.” 2017. Web. 20 Aug 2017.

Vancouver:

Olson KL. Let Them Eat Beef: Effects of Beef Consumption on Markers of Metabolic Syndrome. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. South Dakota State University; 2017. [cited 2017 Aug 20]. Available from: http://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/1124.

Council of Science Editors:

Olson KL. Let Them Eat Beef: Effects of Beef Consumption on Markers of Metabolic Syndrome. [Masters Thesis]. South Dakota State University; 2017. Available from: http://openprairie.sdstate.edu/etd/1124

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