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You searched for id:"oai:etd.ohiolink.edu:ucin1491303605085968". One record found.

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1. Thielo, Angela J. Redemption in an Era of Penal Harm: Moving Beyond Offender Exclusion.

Degree: PhD, Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services: Criminal Justice, 2017, University of Cincinnati

For nearly forty years, the United States was in the grips of punitive thinking and mired in an era of mass imprisonment. The hallmarks of this paradigm were the embrace of policies and practices that systematically excluded convicted offenders from full participation in civic, social, and economic life. In recent years, however, it appears that American corrections has experienced a historic transformation that involves efforts to foster offender inclusion in society. Thus, policymakers are increasingly questioning the use of mass imprisonment and are embracing a campaign to downsize American prisons. Similarly, they are advocating for reentry services for released offenders and calling for reductions in the collateral consequences that attach to a criminal conviction. Punitive rhetoric seems in decline, replaced by discussion of the importance of offender rehabilitation and, ultimately, redemption. . This dissertation is an attempt to explore these developments. Specifically, based on a 2017 national, opt-in Internet survey of 1,000 respondents, the study investigates the extent to which the American public rejects the exclusion of offenders and supports their inclusion. In this regard, public support of four aspects of offender inclusion was assessed: the (1) rehabilitation, (2) reentry, (3) reintegration, and (4) redemption of individuals with criminal records. The results reveal that support for offender inclusion is extensive. First, regardless of how it is measured, support for rehabilitation is strong. Americans see rehabilitation as a central goal of prisons, support treatment programs, and favor the new innovation of problem-solving specialty courts. This embrace of treatment is long-standing and must be considered a core American cultural belief or what Alexis de Tocqueville called a “habit of the heart.” Second, the respondents endorsed the concept of prisoner reentry programs, supporting the delivery of an array of supportive services to inmates released to the community. Third, the sample members recognized that collateral consequences could be barriers to offender reintegration, stating that such legal restrictions should be disclosed to criminal defendants, reviewed regularly by legislators, and eliminated if not shown to prevent criminal conduct. The respondents favored voting rights for ex-offenders but were divided on access to jury duty. Support for ban-the-box statutes was high. The subjects were split on the policy of the expungement of records, apparently trying to balance concerns of public safety with concerns over offenders being allowed to resume a prosocial life. It appears that the extent to which citizens permit record expungement is conditioned by how long offenders have been crime free and the dangerousness of the crime committed. Fourth, the public manifested a realistic assessment of the extent to which offenders are capable of leaving a life in crime. Still, about four in five supported rehabilitation ceremonies that would declare ex-offenders “rehabilitated” and the granting of… Advisors/Committee Members: Cullen, Francis (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Criminology; corrections; criminal justice; public opinion; redemption; rehabilitation; reentry

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Thielo, A. J. (2017). Redemption in an Era of Penal Harm: Moving Beyond Offender Exclusion. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Cincinnati. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1491303605085968

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Thielo, Angela J. “Redemption in an Era of Penal Harm: Moving Beyond Offender Exclusion.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Cincinnati. Accessed November 23, 2017. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1491303605085968.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Thielo, Angela J. “Redemption in an Era of Penal Harm: Moving Beyond Offender Exclusion.” 2017. Web. 23 Nov 2017.

Vancouver:

Thielo AJ. Redemption in an Era of Penal Harm: Moving Beyond Offender Exclusion. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Cincinnati; 2017. [cited 2017 Nov 23]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1491303605085968.

Council of Science Editors:

Thielo AJ. Redemption in an Era of Penal Harm: Moving Beyond Offender Exclusion. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Cincinnati; 2017. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=ucin1491303605085968

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