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The Ohio State University

1. Aeilts, Amber. Reactions to receiving family health information via infographic video.

Degree: MS, Genetic Counseling, 2019, The Ohio State University

Although the clinical importance of cascade testing in families with hereditary cancer syndromes is well documented, complicated discussions can arise when genetic information is shared and subsequent discussions among relatives are often complicated. Novel communication aids should be considered to assist aid in these conversations. To investigate one possible method, we evaluated the theoretical impact of receiving unsolicited information about genetic testing performed in one’s family through a video that could be shared via text or social media. Participants (N=399) viewed a video describing a relative’s recent BRCA+ diagnosis and the potential impact on themselves. They also completed a survey with questions regarding thoughts on the message, hypothetical willingness to act on results, and other measured variables. The electronic survey instrument was built using the Health Belief Model, which postulates that an individual is more likely to engage in a behavior if they perceive greater risk in their severity and susceptibility, greater benefits than barriers to engagement in the behavior, self-efficacy, and a cue to action. This framework was used to measure participants’ willingness to undergo genetic testing, seek out a genetic counselor, discuss genetic testing with their doctor, and talk to family members about their family history of cancer. Characteristics shown to impact intent to take action in these categories included intolerance of uncertainty, having a close family history of cancer, and greater family dynamics (ps < .05). A majority of participants (75.95%, N=300) would undergo genetic testing if it cost $100 or less. Additionally, a majority of participants (70%, N=281) were willing to meet with a healthcare professional to discuss genetic testing. Understanding potential reactions to receiving unsolicited genetic information is the first step in investigating novel communication aids in cascade testing. Advisors/Committee Members: Senter-Jamieson, Leigha (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Genetics; genetics; genetic counseling; cancer genetics; BRCA; HBOC; hereditary breast and ovarian cancer; family communication

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Aeilts, A. (2019). Reactions to receiving family health information via infographic video. (Masters Thesis). The Ohio State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1555065910789879

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Aeilts, Amber. “Reactions to receiving family health information via infographic video.” 2019. Masters Thesis, The Ohio State University. Accessed June 25, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1555065910789879.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Aeilts, Amber. “Reactions to receiving family health information via infographic video.” 2019. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Aeilts A. Reactions to receiving family health information via infographic video. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2019. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1555065910789879.

Council of Science Editors:

Aeilts A. Reactions to receiving family health information via infographic video. [Masters Thesis]. The Ohio State University; 2019. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=osu1555065910789879

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