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Bowling Green State University

1. Pryor, Cori. Living in Occupied Territory: A Study of Militarization and Use of Force.

Degree: MA, Sociology, 2020, Bowling Green State University

Police militarization is happening on a widespread scale across the United States.However, very little is known about its relationship with use of force. At the same time, there hasbeen a growing focus on community policing. Given the concurrent establishment of both ofthese trends, it is problematic that we do not know how these two tactics interplay with oneanother, especially in regard to use of force. Additionally, though force is thought to be amechanism of social control that is unequally distributed in nonwhite communities, studiesexamining the link between militarization and use of force have yet to include race/ethnicity intotheir analysis. This paper attempts to address this important gap in the literature by examiningthe relationship between militarization and use of force through the lens of minority threattheory. I use data from Law Enforcement Management and Statistics 2013, AmericanCommunity Survey 2009, and Uniform Crime Reports 2013, as well as item response theory andmultivariate regression techniques to study this relationship. Results show that militarization ispositive and significantly related to the number of use of force incidents recorded by an agency.Additionally, community policing shares a positive and significant relationship with use of force.However, neither racial demographics nor community policing moderate the relationshipbetween militarization and use of force. These findings stress that law enforcement agenciesshould proceed with caution when adopting new policing strategies without having a thoroughunderstanding of how they relate to use of force. Advisors/Committee Members: Mowen, Thomas (Advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Sociology; Criminology; policing; militarization; use of force; minority threat theory; community policing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pryor, C. (2020). Living in Occupied Territory: A Study of Militarization and Use of Force. (Masters Thesis). Bowling Green State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1586375128284893

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pryor, Cori. “Living in Occupied Territory: A Study of Militarization and Use of Force.” 2020. Masters Thesis, Bowling Green State University. Accessed June 01, 2020. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1586375128284893.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pryor, Cori. “Living in Occupied Territory: A Study of Militarization and Use of Force.” 2020. Web. 01 Jun 2020.

Vancouver:

Pryor C. Living in Occupied Territory: A Study of Militarization and Use of Force. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Bowling Green State University; 2020. [cited 2020 Jun 01]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1586375128284893.

Council of Science Editors:

Pryor C. Living in Occupied Territory: A Study of Militarization and Use of Force. [Masters Thesis]. Bowling Green State University; 2020. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=bgsu1586375128284893

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