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University of Texas – Austin

1. -6150-2341. Muslims’ patients’ medication use behavior and perceptions regarding collaboration with pharmacists during Ramadan.

Degree: Pharmacy, 2018, University of Texas – Austin

The purpose of this study was to identify factors influencing Muslim diabetic patients’ medication usage changes during Ramadan without a health care provider’s approval and to describe their perceptions of proposed pharmacists’ services during Ramadan. An anonymous survey was distributed in two languages (English and Arabic) to a convenience sample of adult diabetic Muslims at two mosques in San Antonio, TX. Andersen’s behavioral model of health services for vulnerable populations was used as the study model. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the impact of participants’ predisposing, enabling, need, and satisfaction with care factors on whether they changed their medication usage during Ramadan without a health care provider’s approval (no change or changing only the medication time vs. changing aspects other than the medication time). In addition, a scale of 17 items divided into four subdomains (encouragement and support regarding fasting, understanding Islamic religion/culture, creating a Muslim-friendly and welcoming environment, and modifying medications for fasting) was used to address the second objective. Descriptive statistics were performed for all the study variables and Cronbach’s alphas were performed to assess scale reliability. A total of 76 participants with diabetes completed the survey. The scales showed good to excellent internal consistency reliability (i.e., Cronbach’s alphas between 0.67 and 0.91). The independent-samples t-test showed that participants who changed their medications without health care providers’ approval had: more health care barriers (2.7 ± 0.5 vs. 2.2 ± 0.4), more diabetic complications (2.8 ± 2.2 vs 1.5 ± 0.7), and lower satisfaction with care (3.3 ± 0.9 vs 3.8 ± 0.6 ) when compared to those who did not change or changed only the time of their medications. The multivariate logistic regression showed that only health care barriers had a significant relationship with participants’ changing medication usage during Ramadan without a health care provider’s approval (Wald chi-square = 5.70, p = 0.017). As the score for health barriers increased by one unit, the odds of changing medication usage without a health care provider’s approval increased by 7.20 times (OR = 7.20, 95% CI = 1.43 – 36.4, p = 0.017). A post-hoc multivariate logistic regression analysis exploring specific barriers showed that only the health care cost barriers had a statistically significant relationship with participants’ changing medication usage during Ramadan without a health care provider’s approval (Wald chi-square = 4.37, p = 0.037). As health care cost barriers increased by one unit, the odds of changing medication usage without a health care provider’s approval increased by 2.23 times (OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.05 – 4.72, p = 0.037). Regarding the proposed pharmacists’ services during Ramadan, participants had positive perceptions (3.9 ± 0.7; out of 5). Participants were in favor of pharmacists better understanding their religion and culture so as to help them… Advisors/Committee Members: Barner, Jamie C. (advisor), Brown, Carolyn (committee member), Ford, Kentya (committee member), Rascati, Karen (committee member), Atif, Said (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Muslims; Ramadan; Diabetes; Medication adherence; Minorities health; Pharmacist satisfactions; Medication usage behavior

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APA (6th Edition):

-6150-2341. (2018). Muslims’ patients’ medication use behavior and perceptions regarding collaboration with pharmacists during Ramadan. (Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68745

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-6150-2341. “Muslims’ patients’ medication use behavior and perceptions regarding collaboration with pharmacists during Ramadan.” 2018. Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed November 20, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68745.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-6150-2341. “Muslims’ patients’ medication use behavior and perceptions regarding collaboration with pharmacists during Ramadan.” 2018. Web. 20 Nov 2018.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-6150-2341. Muslims’ patients’ medication use behavior and perceptions regarding collaboration with pharmacists during Ramadan. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2018. [cited 2018 Nov 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68745.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

-6150-2341. Muslims’ patients’ medication use behavior and perceptions regarding collaboration with pharmacists during Ramadan. [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68745

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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