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University of Washington

1. Morris, Jenna. Cutting a course: examining the effects of historical thinning treatments on directing forest response to bark beetle outbreaks.

Degree: 2021, University of Washington

Bark beetle outbreaks are major natural disturbances in temperate forests across the northern hemisphere, contributing to extensive tree mortality and driving forest change. Recent widespread and severe outbreaks—and projected climate-driven changes to disturbance activity—have raised concerns about forest resilience and the interaction of future outbreaks with other disturbances (e.g., fire). Thinning (i.e., density reduction) treatments may promote resilience to bark beetles by fostering resistance or bolstering forest capacity to respond post outbreak, but opportunities to test treatment efficacy and longevity have been rare. Further, forest managers must consider the effects of thinning on additional objectives such as tradeoffs between fire hazard mitigation and carbon storage. Here, I used a replicated study of old-growth lodgepole pine stands thinned in 1940 and affected by a recent (early 2000s) severe mountain pine beetle outbreak to examine the effects of thinning on (1) components of resilience to outbreak, and (2) post-outbreak fire hazard and carbon storage. I measured stand structural attributes in the field ~8 years post-outbreak and compared resistance to beetle attack (tree- and stand-scale survival), successional trajectories, fuel profiles, and aboveground carbon biomass between uncut (control) and thinned treatment units. Thinning six decades prior to mountain pine beetle outbreak had limited effects on resistance, but additional effects of thinning on stand trajectories, surface and canopy fuel profiles, and aboveground carbon storage persisted following severe outbreak. This study broadens the temporal extent of our understanding of thinning effects on directing forest response to bark beetle outbreaks, with important implications for developing effective management decisions in the face of global change. Advisors/Committee Members: Harvey, Brian J (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: carbon storage; disturbance interactions; fire; lodgepole pine; mountain pine beetle; Rocky Mountains; Environmental science; Ecology; Forestry; Forestry

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Morris, J. (2021). Cutting a course: examining the effects of historical thinning treatments on directing forest response to bark beetle outbreaks. (Thesis). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/46806

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Morris, Jenna. “Cutting a course: examining the effects of historical thinning treatments on directing forest response to bark beetle outbreaks.” 2021. Thesis, University of Washington. Accessed April 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/46806.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Morris, Jenna. “Cutting a course: examining the effects of historical thinning treatments on directing forest response to bark beetle outbreaks.” 2021. Web. 22 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Morris J. Cutting a course: examining the effects of historical thinning treatments on directing forest response to bark beetle outbreaks. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2021. [cited 2021 Apr 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/46806.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Morris J. Cutting a course: examining the effects of historical thinning treatments on directing forest response to bark beetle outbreaks. [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2021. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/46806

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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