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University of Washington

1. McKinney, Todd Raymond. “The Excavation of Artistic Process; Mining for knowledge, technique and materials to create form.”.

Degree: 2020, University of Washington

My judgement is purely out of excitement or joy I get from a work. I often work on multiple pieces at a time. Time is instrumental to the process as it involves repeat judgement and meditation. Creation of a work can take weeks and sometimes even months. Before any painting session I mediate on the outcomes in my head. This helps me visualize my goals and reduce the chances of bad outcomes. If I do not give the work room to breathe, it usually ends in the works death. But somehow what is created in the process of a mistake, something interesting can happen. In contrast a feeling of dread, or the implication of violence can also be of equal importance. The work needs to be formally exciting, with a quality composition and the illusion of space. I am not interested in creating a pretty picture or working from observation, but rather working from and sparking the human imagination. What was the original thought or jumping point for the work? Have I followed the path of conception, or has the work evolved into something else? Is there a certain level of confusion or disorientation to the work? In this Instagram age we are consuming images at a rapid rate. I follow a lineage of MC Escher and Optical artists. Their works are both disorientating and visually interesting. They force you to really think about what you are observing as a human. The science of the brain and eyes as a sensory system interests me. I ask myself what we can perceive as humans and why are some things invisible to the human eye. Are we in fact hallucinating as a species? Our brains have been filling the blanks in our vision for a long time. Advisors/Committee Members: Govedare, Philip (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Art; Computer Science; Mathematics; Philosophy; Physics; Religion; Art education; Arts management; Art history; Fine arts

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McKinney, T. R. (2020). “The Excavation of Artistic Process; Mining for knowledge, technique and materials to create form.”. (Thesis). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/45770

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McKinney, Todd Raymond. ““The Excavation of Artistic Process; Mining for knowledge, technique and materials to create form.”.” 2020. Thesis, University of Washington. Accessed September 25, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/45770.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McKinney, Todd Raymond. ““The Excavation of Artistic Process; Mining for knowledge, technique and materials to create form.”.” 2020. Web. 25 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

McKinney TR. “The Excavation of Artistic Process; Mining for knowledge, technique and materials to create form.”. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2020. [cited 2020 Sep 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/45770.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

McKinney TR. “The Excavation of Artistic Process; Mining for knowledge, technique and materials to create form.”. [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/45770

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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