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University of Washington

1. Ievins, Aiva Mara Vitrungs. Methods to promote reanimation and rehabilitation of forelimb function after spinal cord injury.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Washington

Spinal cord injury is a devastating condition that can severely limit motor and sensory function and make an individual completely dependent on others for care. The effects of spinal cord injury are debilitating, and available treatments have limited effect. Impaired signal transduction, increased inhibitory molecules near the injury site, and cell damage all contribute to poor recovery from spinal cord injury. The following chapters describe experiments that aim to address these three obstacles to restore movement to paralyzed limbs. Electrical stimulation treatment can induce movements of paralyzed limbs, but these treatments have not yet restored normal motor function. A user-controlled stimulation system may improve the effects of spinal cord stimulation by allowing the user to trigger movements relevant to a particular task. In addition, supplementary treatments that mitigate the biological reaction to spinal cord injury may be necessary to achieve lasting improvements in motor function. Chondroitinase treatment can introduce a period of plasticity in the adult central nervous system and promote sprouting of descending fibers in the injured spinal cord. Electrical stimulation may help to guide sprouting fibers toward motor neuron targets to circumvent the injury. Stem cell treatment can provide cells to replace or help rehabilitate injured cells, and electrical stimulation may help to guide these new cells toward the formation of beneficial motor circuits. This thesis demonstrates the potential of a brain-controlled spinal stimulation device to restore task-related movements, present a novel behavioral task to evaluate motor recovery in a rat model of spinal cord injury, and investigate the utility of chondroitinase and stem cell treatments in restoring function after spinal cord injury. Advisors/Committee Members: Moritz, Chet T (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: chondroitinase; rat behavior; spinal cord injury; spinal stimulation; stem cell; stimulation; Neurosciences; Behavioral neuroscience

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APA (6th Edition):

Ievins, A. M. V. (2017). Methods to promote reanimation and rehabilitation of forelimb function after spinal cord injury. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40484

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ievins, Aiva Mara Vitrungs. “Methods to promote reanimation and rehabilitation of forelimb function after spinal cord injury.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed November 19, 2017. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40484.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ievins, Aiva Mara Vitrungs. “Methods to promote reanimation and rehabilitation of forelimb function after spinal cord injury.” 2017. Web. 19 Nov 2017.

Vancouver:

Ievins AMV. Methods to promote reanimation and rehabilitation of forelimb function after spinal cord injury. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. [cited 2017 Nov 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40484.

Council of Science Editors:

Ievins AMV. Methods to promote reanimation and rehabilitation of forelimb function after spinal cord injury. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40484

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