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You searched for id:"handle:10388/8287". One record found.

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University of Saskatchewan

1. Garvey, Philip Michael 1989-. THE SHORT- AND LONG- TERM EFFECT OF ZINC AND COPPER CONTAMINATION ON SOIL MICROBIAL FUNCTIONS.

Degree: 2017, University of Saskatchewan

Soil microbial functions are vital for maintaining soil health and are therefore also essential for the provision of services required to support human and ecological health. The inadvertent release of trace metals into soil ecosystems through their extraction, processing, and use of metal ores has led to elevated soil trace metal concentrations worldwide. To preserve soil ecosystem functions and soil health, soil regulatory limits that define acceptable limits of trace metals in the environment need to be set. This is done to reduce the exposure of the soil microbial community to potentially hazardous and toxic substances. However, no single concentration of trace metals can be used to ensure the universal protection of all soil ecosystems. There is therefore a need to define the safe limits of exposure to trace metals in different land-uses. Considerable evidence shows soil microbial functions are affected by trace metal contamination in the short term but are restored over time. However, the long-term effect of trace metals on soil microbial functions is poorly understood. Much of the available data on adaptation is derived from studies focused on agricultural soils in Europe. This study aimed to examine soil enzyme activity across a range of different soil types and determine the long-term effects of zinc and copper contamination, focusing on artificially managed and natural systems, such as agricultural, urban, and anthropic soils, grassland, and forest soil. Initially this investigation validated new methods to determine soil enzyme activity. Standard methods of assessing soil enzyme activity require significant quantities of soil to be collected to then assess contaminated sites and determine toxicity. This experiment aimed to reduce the overall quantity of soil required by an order of magnitude. The assessment of soil nutrient cycling forms a part of all site investigations carried out by Canadian risk assessors. One of the key factors influencing the cost and therefore the scope and size of any potential investigation is the transportation of soils from a site to laboratories for experimentation. Therefore, a low soil requirement assay would significantly expand the potential for site investigations into nutrient cycling. This work demonstrates the validity of a low soil requirement nutrient cycling enzyme (phosphorus, sulfur, and carbon) assay and functional (nitrification) assay. These assays were applied to investigate different soil remediation treatments as part of a site investigation. Heterotrophic and autotrophic nitrification responded differently to lime addition over a decade and the assay demonstrated the effectiveness of different soil treatments (biochar, smectite) and hydro-seeding on soil enzyme activities. The central research of this work focused the soil enzyme activities of 18 soils from across Western Canada. Providing a clear demonstration of the capability of soil enzyme assays for terrestrial eco-toxicity assessment and how this method meets the requirements of the CCME for the… Advisors/Committee Members: Siciliano, Steven (advisor), Farrell, Richard (committee member), Adl, Sina (committee member), Peak, Derek (committee member), Dumonceaux, Tim (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Soil; Microbial; Toxicity; Zinc; Copper; Land-use

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Garvey, P. M. 1. (2017). THE SHORT- AND LONG- TERM EFFECT OF ZINC AND COPPER CONTAMINATION ON SOIL MICROBIAL FUNCTIONS. (Thesis). University of Saskatchewan. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10388/8287

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Garvey, Philip Michael 1989-. “THE SHORT- AND LONG- TERM EFFECT OF ZINC AND COPPER CONTAMINATION ON SOIL MICROBIAL FUNCTIONS.” 2017. Thesis, University of Saskatchewan. Accessed December 18, 2017. http://hdl.handle.net/10388/8287.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Garvey, Philip Michael 1989-. “THE SHORT- AND LONG- TERM EFFECT OF ZINC AND COPPER CONTAMINATION ON SOIL MICROBIAL FUNCTIONS.” 2017. Web. 18 Dec 2017.

Vancouver:

Garvey PM1. THE SHORT- AND LONG- TERM EFFECT OF ZINC AND COPPER CONTAMINATION ON SOIL MICROBIAL FUNCTIONS. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2017. [cited 2017 Dec 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/8287.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Garvey PM1. THE SHORT- AND LONG- TERM EFFECT OF ZINC AND COPPER CONTAMINATION ON SOIL MICROBIAL FUNCTIONS. [Thesis]. University of Saskatchewan; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10388/8287

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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