Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

You searched for id:"handle:10063/8930". One record found.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Victoria University of Wellington

1. Soar, Max. After the fact(s): Communicating scientific complexity, risk, and uncertainty in Aotearoa.

Degree: 2020, Victoria University of Wellington

This thesis draws on social constructivist theories of scientific knowledge to analyse the public engagement practices of a cohort of scientist-communicators in Aotearoa as they represent scientific complexity, risk, and uncertainty in public. Through semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis, this thesis demonstrates that participants think defensively about the publics they communicate to, drawing boundaries between science and publics that minimise exposure of the elements of scientific knowledge they perceive might undermine scientific authority. Such boundary-work often demarcates public engagement from scientific knowledge production, constructing public engagement as a subjective process applied to scientific knowledge after the fact. These science-communicators also work to overcome these very same boundaries by making science more accessible and democratic. Such tensions suggest that participants not only socially construct science, but also contribute to the social construction of public engagement with science as they work to transform systemic and cultural barriers acting to entrench science as an inaccessible, exclusive, and unilateral arbiter of knowledge. In doing so, participants found that presenting a more accurate, complex picture of science—with all its uncertainties and failures—had not undermined public confidence in science. Instead, complexity, risk and uncertainty could become transparent elements of scientific knowledge production, thereby open to public scrutiny and definition. Participants’ representations of complexity, risk, and uncertainty were influenced by accessible, local publications, and economic and institutional conditions, but rarely by established public engagement scholarship. Advisors/Committee Members: Priestley, Rebecca, Appleton, Nayantara.

Subjects/Keywords: Science communication; Complexity; Risk; Uncertainty

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Soar, M. (2020). After the fact(s): Communicating scientific complexity, risk, and uncertainty in Aotearoa. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/8930

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Soar, Max. “After the fact(s): Communicating scientific complexity, risk, and uncertainty in Aotearoa.” 2020. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed July 08, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/8930.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Soar, Max. “After the fact(s): Communicating scientific complexity, risk, and uncertainty in Aotearoa.” 2020. Web. 08 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Soar M. After the fact(s): Communicating scientific complexity, risk, and uncertainty in Aotearoa. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2020. [cited 2020 Jul 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/8930.

Council of Science Editors:

Soar M. After the fact(s): Communicating scientific complexity, risk, and uncertainty in Aotearoa. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/8930

.