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University of Waterloo

1. Hamberg, L. Jonas. The effect of ecosystem change, restoration, and plant diversity on thermally imaged surface temperature.

Degree: 2020, University of Waterloo

The objective of this dissertation was to test and quantify the hypothesis from ecosystem thermodynamics: that the surface temperature of a terrestrial ecosystem changes with the state of the ecosystem in general, and with plant species diversity in particular. Daytime surface temperature of vegetated terrestrial ecosystems has been hypothesized to decrease with increased biomass and diversity as they in turn increase transpiration, respiration, physical thermal inertia, and productivity, thereby reducing the portion of energy re-emitted as thermal radiation. The hypothesis is tested, and the results and applications are discussed, within the context of ecosystem restoration. I investigated the relationship between ecosystem surface temperature and time since restoration, type of restoration methods, and changes in ecological attributes, including plant species diversity, in two projects restoring temperate wooded ecosystems. The first restoration studied, described in Chapter 2, was a 500+ ha project restoring farmland to oak woodland, spread over 31 fields. Thermal images from 4 space-based instruments along with 12 years of in-situ sampled ecological data of the project were analyzed and compared. Significant decreases in daytime summer surface temperature (4.5 °C in 12 years), and summer diurnal temperature variation (5 °C in 8 years) over time since restorations were found. The study also found a significant relationship between increased plant species diversity and decreased surface temperature when controlling for plant cover and other vegetation attributes. Native plant species had a more pronounced relationship with surface temperature than exotic ones. The results from this study supported the hypothesis, quantified its effect, and showed how thermal imaging from space-based instruments may be used to assess the progress of restoration and the increase in species diversity. The second project studied, in Chapters 3 and 4, was of application of multiple overlapping restoration treatments to experimental plots at two former farmland sites already planted with trees, and one abandoned gravel pit. The main experimental restoration treatment was the transfer of topsoil from a donor forest. On top of the topsoil, further additions were made of woody debris, shrub plantings, and shade shelters. In-situ sampled ecological differences between experimental restoration treatments and controls were assessed in Chapter 3 and thermal differences in Chapter 4. Results from Chapter 3 indicated that most native forest plant species survived within the topsoil as it was transferred from the forest, and re-sprouted in the experimental plots on the second season after the transfer. The plant species community of topsoil recipient plots was significantly different from both recipient and donor site control plots as it contained both the transferred plant species and the species already present at the recipient sites. There was no significant effect on the plant community found from the woody debris, shrub plantings, or…

Subjects/Keywords: restoration; remote sensing; thermal imaging; ecology; ecological restoration; satellite; UAV

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hamberg, L. J. (2020). The effect of ecosystem change, restoration, and plant diversity on thermally imaged surface temperature. (Thesis). University of Waterloo. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10012/16522

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hamberg, L Jonas. “The effect of ecosystem change, restoration, and plant diversity on thermally imaged surface temperature.” 2020. Thesis, University of Waterloo. Accessed January 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10012/16522.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hamberg, L Jonas. “The effect of ecosystem change, restoration, and plant diversity on thermally imaged surface temperature.” 2020. Web. 16 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Hamberg LJ. The effect of ecosystem change, restoration, and plant diversity on thermally imaged surface temperature. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Waterloo; 2020. [cited 2021 Jan 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10012/16522.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hamberg LJ. The effect of ecosystem change, restoration, and plant diversity on thermally imaged surface temperature. [Thesis]. University of Waterloo; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10012/16522

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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