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You searched for +publisher:"York University" +contributor:("Thomas, Mark P."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Aujla, Navneet. Temporary Employment Agencies in Ontario: Experiences of South Asian Immigrant Women.

Degree: MA -MA, Sociology, 2016, York University

Informed by the feminist political economy perspective (FPE), this study examines the experiences of recent South Asian immigrant women working through temporary employment agencies in Ontario, paying particular attention to how social factors such as gender, race and immigrant status shape these experiences. As FPE pays attention to the interconnection between family, state and market, the study examines how women experience precariousness at work, within the household, and trying to settle and integrate. Based on analysis of twelve qualitative interviews and observations as a participant-researcher, findings indicate that recent South Asian immigrant women are funneled into agency work due to a variety of structural barriers, and that the lack of rights associated with agency work leaves them particularly vulnerable to exploitation and poverty. As such, it is proposed that changes must address a lack of security and enforcement of employment standards, and barriers to employment for women and recent immigrants. Advisors/Committee Members: Thomas, Mark P. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Economics, Labor; Precarious work; Precarious employment; Temporary employment agencies; South Asian immigrant women; Experiences of work

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APA (6th Edition):

Aujla, N. (2016). Temporary Employment Agencies in Ontario: Experiences of South Asian Immigrant Women. (Masters Thesis). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32737

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Aujla, Navneet. “Temporary Employment Agencies in Ontario: Experiences of South Asian Immigrant Women.” 2016. Masters Thesis, York University. Accessed January 17, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32737.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Aujla, Navneet. “Temporary Employment Agencies in Ontario: Experiences of South Asian Immigrant Women.” 2016. Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Aujla N. Temporary Employment Agencies in Ontario: Experiences of South Asian Immigrant Women. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. York University; 2016. [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32737.

Council of Science Editors:

Aujla N. Temporary Employment Agencies in Ontario: Experiences of South Asian Immigrant Women. [Masters Thesis]. York University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32737

2. Christensen, Benjamin Burger. The Struggle for Security: Risk, Politics and Pension Policy in Ontario, 1960-2016.

Degree: PhD, Sociology, 2017, York University

This dissertation traces the rise and decline of Ontarios workplace pension system that has resulted with growing emphasis on Canadas public pension system, focusing on the postwar period to 2016. Since the mid-1980s, workplace pension coverage in Ontario and across Canada has been decreasing, calling into question the ability of this system to provide adequate retirement income for future workers. Currently, large private and public sector employers such as Air Canada, General Motors Canada and Canada Post are seeking to replace secure defined benefit plans with less secure defined contribution plans. Given these trends, policymakers at the provincial and federal levels have attempted to remedy the insecurity produced by diminishing coverage rates. Using Ontario as a case study to examine Canadas retirement income system, this dissertation asks: Why has the risk of saving for retirement shifted, and what factors have driven this? Drawing from 22 semi-structure interviews with pension professionals, descriptive statistics, and Hansard Parliamentary transcriptions, several findings are established. First, although risk has been increasingly individualized since the 1990s, there is a limit to how much risk workers are willing to accept before political coalitions form to demand government play a larger role in establishing retirement income security. Risk transfer is thus contingent on union power, retiree activism, business lobbying, and the ideological position of governing parties. Second, the rise of individualized risk is generating new provincial/federal political dynamics in the field of pension policy, in which the failure of Canadas workplace pension systems is impacting the welfare state politics of Canada, pointing to the emergence of a new period of pension politics. This finding leads to the conclusion that in the field of pension policy in Canada, the assertion by risk theorists that globalizing forces are transforming the welfare/citizenship nexus away from a model premised on risk sharing to one in which the state must facilitate the needs of rational, risk taking citizens does not adequately describe recent trends in Canadian pension policymaking. Advisors/Committee Members: Thomas, Mark P. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Political Science; Pensions; Pension politics; Policy; Policymaking; Canadian welfare state; Political economy; Ideation; Risk; Individualization; Reflexive modernization; Retirement income; Labour; Workers; Ontario policy; Historical institutionalism; Feminist political economy; Provincial policymaking

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Christensen, B. B. (2017). The Struggle for Security: Risk, Politics and Pension Policy in Ontario, 1960-2016. (Doctoral Dissertation). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/33472

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Christensen, Benjamin Burger. “The Struggle for Security: Risk, Politics and Pension Policy in Ontario, 1960-2016.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, York University. Accessed January 17, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/33472.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Christensen, Benjamin Burger. “The Struggle for Security: Risk, Politics and Pension Policy in Ontario, 1960-2016.” 2017. Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Christensen BB. The Struggle for Security: Risk, Politics and Pension Policy in Ontario, 1960-2016. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. York University; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/33472.

Council of Science Editors:

Christensen BB. The Struggle for Security: Risk, Politics and Pension Policy in Ontario, 1960-2016. [Doctoral Dissertation]. York University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/33472

3. King, Adam Donald Kenneth. The Making and Reproduction of Male Working-Class Identity in a Mining Town.

Degree: PhD, Sociology, 2019, York University

This dissertation is a study of working-class identity and subjectivity among a sample of male nickel miners in Sudbury, Ontario. Recent foreign takeovers of mining firms and a protracted strike at Vale-Inco in 2009-2010 motivate this dissertations new look at class relations and subjectivity in one of Canadas most historically significant regions of working-class organization. This study understands these recent events as part of a set of decades long economic processes that have transformed workers lives in and outside work. It explores how the form that trade unionism took in the post-WWII period has shaped class relations and class identity among male nickel miners in Sudbury. The dissertation asks: how have class subjectivity and socioeconomic change interacted over this history? After first analyzing the political economy of mining in the Sudbury Basin, the dissertation traces the formation of historically situated class subjectivities. In it, I examine how the postwar compromise between capital and labour influenced unionization and class identity among male workers at the mines. I then inquire into how industrial restructuring and job loss, the rise of new managerial strategies and neoliberal governance, and the growth of precarious, contract labour have transformed both the material contexts of workers lives and their practices of reproducing their identities as members of a working class. To form the central arguments of the dissertation, I draw on 26 oral history interviews with current and retired workers, and organize their narratives into three thematic areas of class identity: first, issues of work and the labour process; second, themes of place, space, and belonging in the formation of class identities; and third, how historical memory and generational conflict influence class. Within and across these thematic areas I show how material conditions and workers own practices of identity formation interact, adjust, and at times, contradict. I argue that the postwar class compromise between labour and capital contributed to a resilient form of working-class subjectivity among workers that is reproduced by local processes of social remembering and class reproduction. Yet, industrial restructuring, the growth of precarious employment, and the internationalization of ownership and management at the mines challenge the efficacy of this historical subjectivity. By studying unionized workers who are confronting profound industrial change, this dissertation raises questions about how the making of male working-class identity limited broader processes of class formation, as well as how we understand class and class formation in the global economy at a time when labour movements face growing structural challenges. Advisors/Committee Members: Thomas, Mark P. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Labor relations; Industrial relations; Labour studies; Sociology of work; Oral history; Qualitative sociology; Mining; Unions; Labour movements; Labour history

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

King, A. D. K. (2019). The Making and Reproduction of Male Working-Class Identity in a Mining Town. (Doctoral Dissertation). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/36257

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

King, Adam Donald Kenneth. “The Making and Reproduction of Male Working-Class Identity in a Mining Town.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, York University. Accessed January 17, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/36257.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

King, Adam Donald Kenneth. “The Making and Reproduction of Male Working-Class Identity in a Mining Town.” 2019. Web. 17 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

King ADK. The Making and Reproduction of Male Working-Class Identity in a Mining Town. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. York University; 2019. [cited 2020 Jan 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/36257.

Council of Science Editors:

King ADK. The Making and Reproduction of Male Working-Class Identity in a Mining Town. [Doctoral Dissertation]. York University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/36257

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