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You searched for +publisher:"York University" +contributor:("Goel, Vinod"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Giovannini, Gregory. Modelling a Fractionated System of Deductive Reasoning over Categorical Syllogisms.

Degree: MA -MA, Psychology(Functional Area: Developmental Science), 2018, York University

The study of deductive reasoning has been a major research paradigm in psychology for decades. Recent additions to this literature have focused heavily on neuropsychological evidence. Such a practice is useful for identifying regions associated with particular functions, but fails to clearly define the specific interactions and timescale of these functions. Computational modelling provides a method for creating different cognitive architectures for simulating deductive processes, and ultimately determining which architectures are capable of modelling human reasoning. This thesis details a computational model for solving categorical syllogisms utilizing a fractionated system of brain regions. Lesions are applied to formal and heuristic systems to simulate accuracy and reaction time data for bi-lateral parietal and frontotemporal patients. The model successfully combines belief-bias and other known cognitive biases with a mental models formal approach to recreate the congruency by group effect present in the human data. Implications are drawn to major theories of reasoning. Advisors/Committee Members: Goel, Vinod (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Computer science; Deductive reasoning; Computational modelling; Syllogism; Categorical syllogism; Reasoning; 4CAPS; Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Giovannini, G. (2018). Modelling a Fractionated System of Deductive Reasoning over Categorical Syllogisms. (Masters Thesis). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/34245

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Giovannini, Gregory. “Modelling a Fractionated System of Deductive Reasoning over Categorical Syllogisms.” 2018. Masters Thesis, York University. Accessed January 25, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/34245.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Giovannini, Gregory. “Modelling a Fractionated System of Deductive Reasoning over Categorical Syllogisms.” 2018. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Giovannini G. Modelling a Fractionated System of Deductive Reasoning over Categorical Syllogisms. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. York University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/34245.

Council of Science Editors:

Giovannini G. Modelling a Fractionated System of Deductive Reasoning over Categorical Syllogisms. [Masters Thesis]. York University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/34245

2. Jih, Weipeng. Insight During Development, and its Structural Correlates.

Degree: MA -MA, Psychology(Functional Area: Developmental Science), 2018, York University

We investigate whether adolescents and adults differ in their use of common cognitive processes in solving insight problems. We also investigate whether performance on insight problems is associated with brain structure, and whether these insight-structure associations are distinct or consistent across the two age groups. Common cognitive processes (operationalized by IQ scores) showed a positive trending correlation with insight (operationalized by accuracy in solving verbal riddles) in adults, but not in adolescents. However, these correlations were not significantly different. Thus, we failed to find a cognitive difference between adolescents and adults with regard to insight problem solving. Voxel based morphometry revealed that insight and gray matter volume are related in both age groups. Tract-based spatial statistics revealed that insight and fractional anisotropy values are related in adults. We could not determine whether insight-structure relationships are age-unique or age-consistent. Advisors/Committee Members: Goel, Vinod (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology; Insight; Creativity; VBM; DTI

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jih, W. (2018). Insight During Development, and its Structural Correlates. (Masters Thesis). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/35598

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jih, Weipeng. “Insight During Development, and its Structural Correlates.” 2018. Masters Thesis, York University. Accessed January 25, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/35598.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jih, Weipeng. “Insight During Development, and its Structural Correlates.” 2018. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Jih W. Insight During Development, and its Structural Correlates. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. York University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/35598.

Council of Science Editors:

Jih W. Insight During Development, and its Structural Correlates. [Masters Thesis]. York University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/35598

3. Marling, Mary Ruth Rebecca. Left Hemisphere Lesions Differentially Impact Conditional Reasoning with Familiar and Emotional Content.

Degree: MA -MA, Psychology (Functional Area: Developmental Science), 2015, York University

Conditional reasoning has been widely studied in the cognitive literature, and in the past decade, neuroimaging studies have started to investigate brain networks recruited to solve these logical conditionals. A meta-analysis of these neuroimaging studies of healthy adults has shown that conditional arguments are primarily associated with left-lateralized activation in the parietal and frontal lobes. Beyond logical form, content factors such as belief- logic congruency, familiarity, and emotion have been shown to recruit networks different from the main effect of reasoning. To date, conditional connectives have not been investigated using traumatic brain injury patients, therefore, the goal of this thesis was to study the effect of brain lesions on conditional reasoning. A whole brain analysis using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM) was conducted on 72 neurological patients with unilateral lesions in order to explore the impact of brain lesions on reasoning accuracy scores. Results indicated that conditional reasoning with familiar content is highly dependent on left hemisphere intactness, whereas right hemisphere volume loss does not inhibit performance and in some conditions may even lead to improved performance. In particular, we found that familiar believable content failed to benefit patients with left hemisphere lesions. Additionally, VLSM analysis isolated a region in the left medial prefrontal cortex deemed necessary for reasoning with emotional content, the 10 patients with lesions in this cluster performed significantly worse than all other patients and controls on emotional conditionals. Our findings provide additional evidence that reasoning processes involving familiar content are largely left lateralized and that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex is specifically engaged in reasoning about emotional content. This is the first study to use a lesion analysis to investigate conditionals, and thus contributes important new information to the existing neuroimaging literature. Advisors/Committee Members: Goel, Vinod (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Cognitive psychology; Neurosciences; Psychology; Conditional reasoning; Emotion; Belief-logic congruency; Congruency; Familiar content; Deductive reasoning; VLSM; Traumatic brain injury; ABLe; Lesions

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Marling, M. R. R. (2015). Left Hemisphere Lesions Differentially Impact Conditional Reasoning with Familiar and Emotional Content. (Masters Thesis). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/30018

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Marling, Mary Ruth Rebecca. “Left Hemisphere Lesions Differentially Impact Conditional Reasoning with Familiar and Emotional Content.” 2015. Masters Thesis, York University. Accessed January 25, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/30018.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Marling, Mary Ruth Rebecca. “Left Hemisphere Lesions Differentially Impact Conditional Reasoning with Familiar and Emotional Content.” 2015. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Marling MRR. Left Hemisphere Lesions Differentially Impact Conditional Reasoning with Familiar and Emotional Content. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. York University; 2015. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/30018.

Council of Science Editors:

Marling MRR. Left Hemisphere Lesions Differentially Impact Conditional Reasoning with Familiar and Emotional Content. [Masters Thesis]. York University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/30018

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