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You searched for +publisher:"York University" +contributor:("Canefe, Nergis"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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York University

1. Miceli, Vanessa Nathalie. Uncertain Grounds: Key Moves in the Making of Modernity, from Tudor England to the Globalized Present.

Degree: PhD, Social & Political Thought, 2020, York University

Which historical lens and what scope can capture modernitys complex social, political, economic, and epistemic permutations? Using an historical interpretive lens to explore contingent moments in its making, this work seeks to describe a core dynamic within modernity. In modernity, the assertion of freedom from rooted systems of meaning ushers in radical uncertainty. In response, new certainties are constructed for guiding human action, but being grounded upon indeterminacy these are necessarily provisional and open ended. Uncertainty thus grows in proportion to the expansion of freedom and the abstraction of foundations, making the drives to know and to control insatiable. To narrate a history of this dynamic, I frame it as a series of strategies for grounding upon groundlessness: surveying and mapping, enclosing and improving; risking and insuring. This narrative is largely set in the particular soil of British history, where the discourses surrounding efforts to ground property and knowledge upon new certainties uncovers the contingent nature of truth and legitimacy in modernity. In the Tudor period customary knowledge of the land was delegitimized as estate surveyors began to measure and represent land from the distanced perspective of geometry. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the discourse of improvement legitimized the practice of enclosure as the means of securing certainty of ownership in order to cultivate endless growth, while Baconian science pursued a parallel strategy. In the eighteenth century, risk was objectified in probability theory and traded in insurance and investment markets. Since the nineteenth century risk management has been applied to populations and has become the guarantor of security and the means of governing societies across the globe. But perpetual efforts to know and contain risks have only generated more insecurity. I conclude that while founded upon freedom, modernity is a compulsion that draws us ever further from the soil of particularity. Using an historical interpretive approach and drawing on the histories of science, capitalism and insurance, as well as theories of modernity, property and risk, this project is an interdisciplinary effort to understand the making of key dynamics within modernity. Advisors/Committee Members: Canefe, Nergis (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Philosophy; Modernity; Property; Epistemology; Legitimacy; Abstraction; Objectification; Uncertainty; Open future; Groundlessness; Enclosure; Surveying; Mapping; Improvement; Risk; Insurance; Quantification; Social property; Statistics; Technologies of distance; Providence; Probability; Modern dynamic; Rationality; Boundary making; Critiques of modernity; Interpretivist methodology; Alienation; British history; Insurance as governance

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Miceli, V. N. (2020). Uncertain Grounds: Key Moves in the Making of Modernity, from Tudor England to the Globalized Present. (Doctoral Dissertation). York University. Retrieved from https://yorkspace.library.yorku.ca/xmlui/handle/10315/37448

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Miceli, Vanessa Nathalie. “Uncertain Grounds: Key Moves in the Making of Modernity, from Tudor England to the Globalized Present.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, York University. Accessed November 26, 2020. https://yorkspace.library.yorku.ca/xmlui/handle/10315/37448.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Miceli, Vanessa Nathalie. “Uncertain Grounds: Key Moves in the Making of Modernity, from Tudor England to the Globalized Present.” 2020. Web. 26 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Miceli VN. Uncertain Grounds: Key Moves in the Making of Modernity, from Tudor England to the Globalized Present. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. York University; 2020. [cited 2020 Nov 26]. Available from: https://yorkspace.library.yorku.ca/xmlui/handle/10315/37448.

Council of Science Editors:

Miceli VN. Uncertain Grounds: Key Moves in the Making of Modernity, from Tudor England to the Globalized Present. [Doctoral Dissertation]. York University; 2020. Available from: https://yorkspace.library.yorku.ca/xmlui/handle/10315/37448


York University

2. Arda Guney, Talat Balca. The Sublime in Contemporary Art and Politics: The Post 9/11 Art of Middle Eastern Diaspora in North America.

Degree: PhD, Political Science, 2016, York University

This dissertation takes ethnographic approach to researching art with an emphasis on the artistic practices of Middle Eastern diasporic artists in Canada and the USA. This dissertation moves from an account of aesthetic theory to the revival of public interest in art related to the Middle East and the artistic challenges faced by diasporic artists from the Middle East in presenting depictions of their own subjectivity. The Arab Spring, revolutions, bloody protests and riots, as well as the attacks of radical Islamist groups have crowded mainstream news coverage with images of terror and the paradigm of radical destruction. Such reflections of horrific scenery emulate the aesthetics of the sublime in the imagination of contemporary politics. The increasing body of art emphasizing the region of the Middle East has also regenerated this mainstream media focus on the Middle East, Arab lands, and the Muslim landscape" with the same connotation of sublimity. I argue that these artistic reflections presume a particular Middle Eastern diasporic subjectivity that comes into visibility simultaneously as the translator and the witness, as well as the victim or perpetrator of this catastrophic imagery of the Middle East. I explore the artistic practices of the Middle Eastern diaspora in order to understand how they reflect their own self-image in the contemporary art scene to challenge this stereotype of the disaster carrier. I also investigate the novel ways in which the new social movements in the Middle East, such as the Green Movement in Iran or the various Arab Springs, are represented by the art works of critical diasporic artists living in North America and how such representations settle within the landscape of contemporary art. In this study, I consider two major subject matters that are present within diasporic artworks related to Middle East: the artistic representations of home countries and the current socio-political landscape; and the self-design art practices enacted through memories of immigration, performances of body and religiosity in the North American art scene. Rather than an analysis of hegemony, this dissertation analyzes how these art trends claim to be artistically valuable and aim to reach a wide audience, as well as what kinds of artistic desires they evoke. Drawing on critical studies of democratic process and social equity, this book contributes to aesthetic theory on contemporary art and puts forward questions concerning whether or not the oppositional capacity of contemporary art has withered away in neoliberal democracies. Advisors/Committee Members: Canefe, Nergis (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Political Science; Diaspora; Culture; Art; Aesthetics; Contemporary art; Middle Eastern; Middle East; North America; 9/11; Terror; Sublime; Muslim; Rancière; Kant; Lyotard; Agamben; Bare life; Burke; Terrorism; Immigration; Refugee; Diasporic; Consensus; Dissensus; Visual studies; Imagery; Multiculturalism; Self-loss; Hyper-realism; Postmodernism; Tragedy; Selfie; Self-image making; Self design; Artist; Memory; Ethnicity; Religion; Religiosity; Cultural difference; Racism; Body; Security; Communication; Representation; Victim; Hero; Victimization; Affect; Witness; Other; Otherization; Canada; US; USA; America; American; Canadian; Citizen; Citizenship; Migration; Xenophobia; Cosmopolitanism; Liberalism; War on terror; Discourse; Resistance; Opposition; Hegemony; Critical art; Partition of sensible; Visual; Imagination; Post-Enlightenment; Universalism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Arda Guney, T. B. (2016). The Sublime in Contemporary Art and Politics: The Post 9/11 Art of Middle Eastern Diaspora in North America. (Doctoral Dissertation). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32326

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Arda Guney, Talat Balca. “The Sublime in Contemporary Art and Politics: The Post 9/11 Art of Middle Eastern Diaspora in North America.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, York University. Accessed November 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32326.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Arda Guney, Talat Balca. “The Sublime in Contemporary Art and Politics: The Post 9/11 Art of Middle Eastern Diaspora in North America.” 2016. Web. 26 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Arda Guney TB. The Sublime in Contemporary Art and Politics: The Post 9/11 Art of Middle Eastern Diaspora in North America. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. York University; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32326.

Council of Science Editors:

Arda Guney TB. The Sublime in Contemporary Art and Politics: The Post 9/11 Art of Middle Eastern Diaspora in North America. [Doctoral Dissertation]. York University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/32326

3. Ercel, Erkan. Psychonalysis, Fantasy, Postcoloniality: Derivative Nationalism and Historiography in Post-Ottoman Turkey.

Degree: PhD, Sociology, 2014, York University

Probably nowhere are the themes of tolerance and multiculturalism more prominently at display than in the recently flourishing literature on Ottoman religious-ethnic communities in Turkey, wherein Ottoman rule, particularly the Millet System of the 15th -17th centuries, is romanticized by Turkish nativist historiographers as a perfect model of peaceful coexistence distinguished by exemplary hospitality and multicultural tolerance toward the Other, the “minorities”, be they Jews, Armenians or Greeks. In this dissertation, I investigate the role of these nativist historians and their historiography in the recuperation of Turkish national imagery, as well as the pitfalls of this sort of remembrance. While doing so, I draw upon the psychoanalytically-inspired concept of fantasy and postcolonial theory to demonstrate how the fantasy of Ottoman tolerance as a melancholic attachment to the past deals with the empire’s loss by pointing to internal and external enemies as threats to the unity and coherence of the nation. Domestically speaking, this fantasy promises to bring back the golden age in as much as enemies new and old will be eliminated on the way to restoring the nation’s power. At the same time, this fantasy takes on an international significance as it captures the essence of the reaction to the European imperative: “you should become multicultural and liberal like us.” The fantasy of the Ottoman Tolerance beats its European Other at its own game by claiming: “we were already multicultural.” Seen in these terms, the analysis of the nostalgic literature on Ottoman peace can illuminate how the “Occident/Western” and “Oriental/Derivative” (i.e. the Ottoman and Turkish) formations of the national imaginary are constructed, remembered and contested in the contemporary Global South. In light of these discussions I will question the conditions and possibilities of the ethics of remembering the Empire, and of entertaining a different relationship to the past in contemporary politics in Europe and Turkey. The key concern of my work is then to inquire into alternative ways to remember the Empire without remaining trapped in the fantasy of Ottoman tolerance, or its obverse, the fantasy of Oriental/Ottoman Despotism. Advisors/Committee Members: Canefe, Nergis (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Sociology; World history; Nativism; Ottoman tolerance; Ottoman minorities and historiography; Psychoanalysis; Fantasy; Postcoloniality; Post-colonial theory; Ethics; Collective mourning; Social losses and Imperial melancholia; Multiculturalism; Cosmopolitanism; Minorities; European enlargement debates; (ab)use of history; Turkish derivative nationalism; Occidentalism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ercel, E. (2014). Psychonalysis, Fantasy, Postcoloniality: Derivative Nationalism and Historiography in Post-Ottoman Turkey. (Doctoral Dissertation). York University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10315/27633

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ercel, Erkan. “Psychonalysis, Fantasy, Postcoloniality: Derivative Nationalism and Historiography in Post-Ottoman Turkey.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, York University. Accessed November 26, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10315/27633.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ercel, Erkan. “Psychonalysis, Fantasy, Postcoloniality: Derivative Nationalism and Historiography in Post-Ottoman Turkey.” 2014. Web. 26 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Ercel E. Psychonalysis, Fantasy, Postcoloniality: Derivative Nationalism and Historiography in Post-Ottoman Turkey. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. York University; 2014. [cited 2020 Nov 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/27633.

Council of Science Editors:

Ercel E. Psychonalysis, Fantasy, Postcoloniality: Derivative Nationalism and Historiography in Post-Ottoman Turkey. [Doctoral Dissertation]. York University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10315/27633

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