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You searched for +publisher:"Western Washington University" +contributor:("Hooper, David U., 1961-"). Showing records 1 – 18 of 18 total matches.

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Western Washington University

1. Wershow, Samuel T. Retreat to refugia: Severe habitat contraction projected for endemic alpine plants of the Olympic Peninsula.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2017, Western Washington University

 <h1>Abstract:</h1> Premise of the study- The unique geography of the Olympic Peninsula has created a flora with exceptional endemism that may face high rates of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Mountain plants  – Washington (State)  – Olympic Mountains; Climatic changes  – Washington (State) - Olympic Mountains; Plant conservation  – Washington (State)  – Olympic Mountains; Mountain plants  – Effect of global warming on; Plants  – Habitat  – Effect of global warming on; Plants  – Extinction, Ecosystem health; Washington (State); masters theses

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APA (6th Edition):

Wershow, S. T. (2017). Retreat to refugia: Severe habitat contraction projected for endemic alpine plants of the Olympic Peninsula. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/576

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wershow, Samuel T. “Retreat to refugia: Severe habitat contraction projected for endemic alpine plants of the Olympic Peninsula.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/576.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wershow, Samuel T. “Retreat to refugia: Severe habitat contraction projected for endemic alpine plants of the Olympic Peninsula.” 2017. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Wershow ST. Retreat to refugia: Severe habitat contraction projected for endemic alpine plants of the Olympic Peninsula. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/576.

Council of Science Editors:

Wershow ST. Retreat to refugia: Severe habitat contraction projected for endemic alpine plants of the Olympic Peninsula. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2017. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/576


Western Washington University

2. Cohan, Bridger. Hydrologic and Nutrient Fluxes in a Small Watershed with Changing Agricultural Practices.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2018, Western Washington University

  Many watersheds are subject to nonpoint-source inputs of nutrients from human activities, contributing to eutrophication of surface waters. The magnitude of these inputs is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Water quality management – Washington (State) – Nooksack River; Watershed management – Washington (State) – Nooksack River; Nutrient pollution of water – Washington (State) – Nooksack River; Eutrophication – Control – Washington (State) – Nooksack River; Land use – Washington (State) – Nooksack River; Hydrology – Washington (State) – Nooksack River; Nooksack River (Wash.); masters theses

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APA (6th Edition):

Cohan, B. (2018). Hydrologic and Nutrient Fluxes in a Small Watershed with Changing Agricultural Practices. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/684

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cohan, Bridger. “Hydrologic and Nutrient Fluxes in a Small Watershed with Changing Agricultural Practices.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/684.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cohan, Bridger. “Hydrologic and Nutrient Fluxes in a Small Watershed with Changing Agricultural Practices.” 2018. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Cohan B. Hydrologic and Nutrient Fluxes in a Small Watershed with Changing Agricultural Practices. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/684.

Council of Science Editors:

Cohan B. Hydrologic and Nutrient Fluxes in a Small Watershed with Changing Agricultural Practices. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2018. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/684


Western Washington University

3. Monks, Andrew M. Comparing Soil Datasets with the APEX Model: Calibration and Validation for Hydrology and Crop Yield in Whatcom County, Washington.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2016, Western Washington University

  Controlling pollution from agricultural lands is a priority for improving watershed health. Best management practices (BMPs) recommend strategies such as riparian buffers and altered… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Information storage and retrieval systems – Soil science – Evaluation; Soil surveys – Washington (State) – Whatcom County – Mathematical models – Evaluation – Databases; Land capability for agriculture – Washington (State) – Whatcom County – Mathematical models – Evaluation – Databases; Soils – Washington (State) – Whatcom County – Mathematical models – Evaluation – Databases; Watersheds – Research – Washington (State) – Whatcom County; Water quality – Washington (State) – Whatcom County – Data processing; Whatcom County (Wash.); masters theses

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APA (6th Edition):

Monks, A. M. (2016). Comparing Soil Datasets with the APEX Model: Calibration and Validation for Hydrology and Crop Yield in Whatcom County, Washington. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/514

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Monks, Andrew M. “Comparing Soil Datasets with the APEX Model: Calibration and Validation for Hydrology and Crop Yield in Whatcom County, Washington.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/514.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Monks, Andrew M. “Comparing Soil Datasets with the APEX Model: Calibration and Validation for Hydrology and Crop Yield in Whatcom County, Washington.” 2016. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Monks AM. Comparing Soil Datasets with the APEX Model: Calibration and Validation for Hydrology and Crop Yield in Whatcom County, Washington. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2016. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/514.

Council of Science Editors:

Monks AM. Comparing Soil Datasets with the APEX Model: Calibration and Validation for Hydrology and Crop Yield in Whatcom County, Washington. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2016. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/514


Western Washington University

4. Slakey, Daniel. The relationship between native richness and exotic success depends on the index of exotic success and environmental gradients.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2010, Western Washington University

  The theory of resource use pre-emption suggests that diverse communities may be more resistant to invasion than simple communities due to lack of niche… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Serpentine plants – Ecology – California; Serpentine plants – California – Measurement; Exotic plants – Ecology – California; Exotic plants – California – Measurement; Competition (Biology) – California; California; masters theses

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APA (6th Edition):

Slakey, D. (2010). The relationship between native richness and exotic success depends on the index of exotic success and environmental gradients. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/94

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Slakey, Daniel. “The relationship between native richness and exotic success depends on the index of exotic success and environmental gradients.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/94.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Slakey, Daniel. “The relationship between native richness and exotic success depends on the index of exotic success and environmental gradients.” 2010. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Slakey D. The relationship between native richness and exotic success depends on the index of exotic success and environmental gradients. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/94.

Council of Science Editors:

Slakey D. The relationship between native richness and exotic success depends on the index of exotic success and environmental gradients. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2010. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/94


Western Washington University

5. Winter, Hanna M. (Hanna Maria). Temperature and moisture effects on respiration in the organic horizon of a Pacific Northwest forest soil.

Degree: MS, Environmental Sciences, 2014, Western Washington University

  Ecosystem responses to temperature and moisture influence whether terrestrial ecosystems act as sources or sinks of atmospheric CO2, an important greenhouse gas. Soil respiration—defined… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Environmental Sciences; Forest litter – Effect of temperature on – Northwest, Pacific; Forest litter – Moisture – Northwest, Pacific; Soil respiration – Effect of temperature on – Environmental aspects – Northwest, Pacific; Soil moisture – Environmental aspects – Northwest, Pacific; Carbon cycle (Biogeochemistry) – Environmental aspects; Climatic changes; Northwest, Pacific; masters theses

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APA (6th Edition):

Winter, H. M. (. M. (2014). Temperature and moisture effects on respiration in the organic horizon of a Pacific Northwest forest soil. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/373

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Winter, Hanna M (Hanna Maria). “Temperature and moisture effects on respiration in the organic horizon of a Pacific Northwest forest soil.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/373.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Winter, Hanna M (Hanna Maria). “Temperature and moisture effects on respiration in the organic horizon of a Pacific Northwest forest soil.” 2014. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Winter HM(M. Temperature and moisture effects on respiration in the organic horizon of a Pacific Northwest forest soil. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/373.

Council of Science Editors:

Winter HM(M. Temperature and moisture effects on respiration in the organic horizon of a Pacific Northwest forest soil. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2014. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/373


Western Washington University

6. Heard, Kathryn E. (Kathryn Eliazbeth). Systematic analysis of terrestrial carbon stocks in a small catchment of the Kolyma watershed.

Degree: MS, Environmental Sciences, 2014, Western Washington University

  With the strongest climate warming occurring and predicted in the high-latitudes, understanding arctic carbon (C) cycling and the feedback of terrestrial C pools is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Environmental Sciences; Carbon dioxide sinks – Russia (Federation) – Kolyma River Watershed; Carbon sequestration – -Russia (Federation) – Kolyma River Watershed; Global warming – Russia (Federation) – Kolyma River Watershed; Kolyma River Watershed (Russia); masters theses

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APA (6th Edition):

Heard, K. E. (. E. (2014). Systematic analysis of terrestrial carbon stocks in a small catchment of the Kolyma watershed. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/352

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Heard, Kathryn E (Kathryn Eliazbeth). “Systematic analysis of terrestrial carbon stocks in a small catchment of the Kolyma watershed.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/352.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Heard, Kathryn E (Kathryn Eliazbeth). “Systematic analysis of terrestrial carbon stocks in a small catchment of the Kolyma watershed.” 2014. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Heard KE(E. Systematic analysis of terrestrial carbon stocks in a small catchment of the Kolyma watershed. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/352.

Council of Science Editors:

Heard KE(E. Systematic analysis of terrestrial carbon stocks in a small catchment of the Kolyma watershed. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2014. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/352


Western Washington University

7. Johnson, Natasha S. The effects of a widespread, showy invasive plant (Rubus armeniacus) on pollinator visitation rates, pollen deposition, and seed set in a rare native wildflower (Sidalcea hendersonii).

Degree: MS, Biology, 2010, Western Washington University

  The relentless spread of invasive plant species has illuminated their capacity for disrupting essential ecosystem services, including the pollination of native flowers. Invaders that… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Sidalcea – Reproduction; Pollination; Blackberries – Reproduction; masters theses

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APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, N. S. (2010). The effects of a widespread, showy invasive plant (Rubus armeniacus) on pollinator visitation rates, pollen deposition, and seed set in a rare native wildflower (Sidalcea hendersonii). (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/70

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Natasha S. “The effects of a widespread, showy invasive plant (Rubus armeniacus) on pollinator visitation rates, pollen deposition, and seed set in a rare native wildflower (Sidalcea hendersonii).” 2010. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/70.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Natasha S. “The effects of a widespread, showy invasive plant (Rubus armeniacus) on pollinator visitation rates, pollen deposition, and seed set in a rare native wildflower (Sidalcea hendersonii).” 2010. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Johnson NS. The effects of a widespread, showy invasive plant (Rubus armeniacus) on pollinator visitation rates, pollen deposition, and seed set in a rare native wildflower (Sidalcea hendersonii). [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/70.

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson NS. The effects of a widespread, showy invasive plant (Rubus armeniacus) on pollinator visitation rates, pollen deposition, and seed set in a rare native wildflower (Sidalcea hendersonii). [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2010. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/70


Western Washington University

8. Habenicht, Melissa N. Trajectories of Functional and Species Change During Plant Community Assembly in a California Serpentine Grassland.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2015, Western Washington University

  Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie species coexistence and community assembly is central for understanding basic ecological patterns of species’ abundances, how global change may… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Grassland ecology – California; Resource partitioning (Ecology) – California; Biotic communities – California; Biodiversity – Climatic factors – California; Coexistence of species – California; Species – California; California; masters theses

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APA (6th Edition):

Habenicht, M. N. (2015). Trajectories of Functional and Species Change During Plant Community Assembly in a California Serpentine Grassland. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/450

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Habenicht, Melissa N. “Trajectories of Functional and Species Change During Plant Community Assembly in a California Serpentine Grassland.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/450.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Habenicht, Melissa N. “Trajectories of Functional and Species Change During Plant Community Assembly in a California Serpentine Grassland.” 2015. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Habenicht MN. Trajectories of Functional and Species Change During Plant Community Assembly in a California Serpentine Grassland. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2015. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/450.

Council of Science Editors:

Habenicht MN. Trajectories of Functional and Species Change During Plant Community Assembly in a California Serpentine Grassland. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2015. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/450


Western Washington University

9. Berner, Logan T. Evaluation of high-latitude boreal forest growth using satellite-derived vegetation indices.

Degree: MS, Environmental Sciences, 2010, Western Washington University

  Vegetation in northern high-latitudes plays an important role in energy exchange and carbon dynamics, thereby influencing regional and global climate. Vegetation indices derived from… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Environmental Sciences; Taiga ecology; Taigas; Taiga ecology – Remote sensing; Taigas – Remote sensing; Forests and forestry – Remote sensing; masters theses

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APA (6th Edition):

Berner, L. T. (2010). Evaluation of high-latitude boreal forest growth using satellite-derived vegetation indices. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/42

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Berner, Logan T. “Evaluation of high-latitude boreal forest growth using satellite-derived vegetation indices.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/42.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Berner, Logan T. “Evaluation of high-latitude boreal forest growth using satellite-derived vegetation indices.” 2010. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Berner LT. Evaluation of high-latitude boreal forest growth using satellite-derived vegetation indices. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/42.

Council of Science Editors:

Berner LT. Evaluation of high-latitude boreal forest growth using satellite-derived vegetation indices. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2010. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/42


Western Washington University

10. Bahnick, Michelle. Evaluation of the Stream Function Assessment Methodology (SFAM) in watersheds of the Puget Sound lowlands.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2018, Western Washington University

  Effective stream management requires identification of anthropogenic degradation effects on stream functioning. However, few stream assessment protocols aim to evaluate stream functions (i.e., ecosystem… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Stream health – Washington (State) – Puget Sound – Evaluation; Rivers – Environmental aspects – Washington (State) – Puget Sound; Rivers – Washington (State) – Puget Sound – Management; Washington (State; Puget Sound; masters theses

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APA (6th Edition):

Bahnick, M. (2018). Evaluation of the Stream Function Assessment Methodology (SFAM) in watersheds of the Puget Sound lowlands. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/798

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bahnick, Michelle. “Evaluation of the Stream Function Assessment Methodology (SFAM) in watersheds of the Puget Sound lowlands.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/798.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bahnick, Michelle. “Evaluation of the Stream Function Assessment Methodology (SFAM) in watersheds of the Puget Sound lowlands.” 2018. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Bahnick M. Evaluation of the Stream Function Assessment Methodology (SFAM) in watersheds of the Puget Sound lowlands. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/798.

Council of Science Editors:

Bahnick M. Evaluation of the Stream Function Assessment Methodology (SFAM) in watersheds of the Puget Sound lowlands. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2018. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/798


Western Washington University

11. Michel, James T. Seed rain and selected species germination and growth trials: implications for natural and augmented revegetation of post-dam Elwha River floodplain and reservoir sediments.

Degree: MS, Environmental Sciences, 2010, Western Washington University

  The removal of Glines Canyon and Elwha dams from the Elwha River in Olympic National Park, Washington State is scheduled to begin in 2011.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Environmental Sciences; Seeds – Dispersal – Washington (State) – Elwha River; Plant succession – Washington (State) – Elwha River; Revegetation – Washington (State) – Elwha River; Restoration ecology – Washington (State) – Elwha River; Elwha River (Wash.); masters theses

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APA (6th Edition):

Michel, J. T. (2010). Seed rain and selected species germination and growth trials: implications for natural and augmented revegetation of post-dam Elwha River floodplain and reservoir sediments. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/60

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Michel, James T. “Seed rain and selected species germination and growth trials: implications for natural and augmented revegetation of post-dam Elwha River floodplain and reservoir sediments.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/60.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Michel, James T. “Seed rain and selected species germination and growth trials: implications for natural and augmented revegetation of post-dam Elwha River floodplain and reservoir sediments.” 2010. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Michel JT. Seed rain and selected species germination and growth trials: implications for natural and augmented revegetation of post-dam Elwha River floodplain and reservoir sediments. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/60.

Council of Science Editors:

Michel JT. Seed rain and selected species germination and growth trials: implications for natural and augmented revegetation of post-dam Elwha River floodplain and reservoir sediments. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2010. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/60


Western Washington University

12. Dugger, Philip J. Potential effects of short-term climate variation on shrubs, grasshoppers and lizards in the northern Great Basin desert scrub.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2012, Western Washington University

  Analyzing trophic interactions among organisms may refine our ability to predict the impacts of climate change on organismal communities in an ecosystem or biome.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Desert ecology – Climatic factors – Great Basin; Great Basin; masters theses

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APA (6th Edition):

Dugger, P. J. (2012). Potential effects of short-term climate variation on shrubs, grasshoppers and lizards in the northern Great Basin desert scrub. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/216

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dugger, Philip J. “Potential effects of short-term climate variation on shrubs, grasshoppers and lizards in the northern Great Basin desert scrub.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/216.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dugger, Philip J. “Potential effects of short-term climate variation on shrubs, grasshoppers and lizards in the northern Great Basin desert scrub.” 2012. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Dugger PJ. Potential effects of short-term climate variation on shrubs, grasshoppers and lizards in the northern Great Basin desert scrub. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2012. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/216.

Council of Science Editors:

Dugger PJ. Potential effects of short-term climate variation on shrubs, grasshoppers and lizards in the northern Great Basin desert scrub. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2012. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/216


Western Washington University

13. Llewellyn, Chandra T. (Chandra Terezina). Predicting cyanobacteria blooms in 50 lakes of Northwest Washington.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2010, Western Washington University

  Eutrophication is one of the foremost problems affecting our freshwater resources. Excessive nutrient loading impacts freshwater lakes by altering ecosystem processes and degrading water… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Cyanobacterial blooms – Washington (State), Western; Lakes – Washington (State), Western; Water quality – Washington (State), Western – Measurement; Algae – Control – Washington (State), Western; Washington (State), Western; masters theses

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APA (6th Edition):

Llewellyn, C. T. (. T. (2010). Predicting cyanobacteria blooms in 50 lakes of Northwest Washington. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/82

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Llewellyn, Chandra T (Chandra Terezina). “Predicting cyanobacteria blooms in 50 lakes of Northwest Washington.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/82.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Llewellyn, Chandra T (Chandra Terezina). “Predicting cyanobacteria blooms in 50 lakes of Northwest Washington.” 2010. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Llewellyn CT(T. Predicting cyanobacteria blooms in 50 lakes of Northwest Washington. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/82.

Council of Science Editors:

Llewellyn CT(T. Predicting cyanobacteria blooms in 50 lakes of Northwest Washington. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2010. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/82


Western Washington University

14. Fisher, Matthew R. Changes in macromoth community structure following deforestation in Western Washington State.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2011, Western Washington University

  Timber management, especially clear-cut logging, dramatically alters forest ecosystems. In temperate conifer forests of the Pacific Northwest, succession following deforestation is a slow process,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Moths – Effect of logging on – Washington (State), Western; Washington (State), Western; masters theses

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APA (6th Edition):

Fisher, M. R. (2011). Changes in macromoth community structure following deforestation in Western Washington State. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/102

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fisher, Matthew R. “Changes in macromoth community structure following deforestation in Western Washington State.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/102.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fisher, Matthew R. “Changes in macromoth community structure following deforestation in Western Washington State.” 2011. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Fisher MR. Changes in macromoth community structure following deforestation in Western Washington State. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2011. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/102.

Council of Science Editors:

Fisher MR. Changes in macromoth community structure following deforestation in Western Washington State. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2011. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/102


Western Washington University

15. Wahl, Colin. Land use, riparian buffers, and biological stream conditions in the Puget lowlands of Washington.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2012, Western Washington University

  Stream conservation and restoration strategies often focus on preserving extant riparian forest and restoring riparian habitat. In the Pacific Northwest, these efforts are often… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Stream ecology – Washington (State) – Puget Sound Watershed; Water quality biological assessment – Washington (State) – Puget Sound Watershed; Water quality – Washington (State) – Puget Sound Watershed; Land use – Environmental aspects – Washington (State) – Puget Sound Watershed; Riparian restoration – Washington (State) – Puget Sound Watershed; Puget Sound Watershed (Wash.); masters theses

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wahl, C. (2012). Land use, riparian buffers, and biological stream conditions in the Puget lowlands of Washington. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/213

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wahl, Colin. “Land use, riparian buffers, and biological stream conditions in the Puget lowlands of Washington.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/213.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wahl, Colin. “Land use, riparian buffers, and biological stream conditions in the Puget lowlands of Washington.” 2012. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Wahl C. Land use, riparian buffers, and biological stream conditions in the Puget lowlands of Washington. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2012. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/213.

Council of Science Editors:

Wahl C. Land use, riparian buffers, and biological stream conditions in the Puget lowlands of Washington. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2012. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/213


Western Washington University

16. Carr, Amanda N. Long-term propagule pressure overwhelms early community determination of invader success in a serpentine grassland.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2018, Western Washington University

  The role of plant diversity in reducing invasions has generated decades of debate. Diverse communities might be more resistant to invasion because the communities… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Grassland ecology; Plant diversity – Environmental aspects; Introduced organisms – Environmental aspects; Grasses – Variation – Environmental aspects; Yellow starthistle – Propagation – Environmental aspects; Yellow starthistle – Biological control – Environmental aspects; masters theses

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Carr, A. N. (2018). Long-term propagule pressure overwhelms early community determination of invader success in a serpentine grassland. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/704

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Carr, Amanda N. “Long-term propagule pressure overwhelms early community determination of invader success in a serpentine grassland.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/704.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Carr, Amanda N. “Long-term propagule pressure overwhelms early community determination of invader success in a serpentine grassland.” 2018. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Carr AN. Long-term propagule pressure overwhelms early community determination of invader success in a serpentine grassland. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/704.

Council of Science Editors:

Carr AN. Long-term propagule pressure overwhelms early community determination of invader success in a serpentine grassland. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2018. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/704


Western Washington University

17. Harper-Smith, Sarah. Modeling relative effects of riparian cover and groundwater inflow on stream temperature in lowland Whatcom County, Washington.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2008, Western Washington University

  Many Pacific Northwest streams have water temperatures that exceed thermal thresholds for salmonids. Supporting and maintaining streams with temperatures below these thermal thresholds requires… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Water temperature – Washington (State) – Whatcom County – Mathematical models; Riparian ecology – Washington (State) – Whatcom County; Groundwater flow – Washington (State) – Whatcom County; Whatcom County (Wash.); masters theses

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harper-Smith, S. (2008). Modeling relative effects of riparian cover and groundwater inflow on stream temperature in lowland Whatcom County, Washington. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/2

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harper-Smith, Sarah. “Modeling relative effects of riparian cover and groundwater inflow on stream temperature in lowland Whatcom County, Washington.” 2008. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/2.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harper-Smith, Sarah. “Modeling relative effects of riparian cover and groundwater inflow on stream temperature in lowland Whatcom County, Washington.” 2008. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Harper-Smith S. Modeling relative effects of riparian cover and groundwater inflow on stream temperature in lowland Whatcom County, Washington. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2008. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/2.

Council of Science Editors:

Harper-Smith S. Modeling relative effects of riparian cover and groundwater inflow on stream temperature in lowland Whatcom County, Washington. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2008. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/2


Western Washington University

18. Zack, Rachel M.S. The evolution of mating cues in a beetle hybrid zone: causes of geographic variation in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2008, Western Washington University

  The reinforcement of pre-mating barriers in a hybrid zone often leads to reproductive character displacement. However, it can be difficult to link evidence for… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biology; Chrysomelidae; Chrysomelidae – Sexual behavior; Hybridization; Evolution (Biology); masters theses

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zack, R. M. S. (2008). The evolution of mating cues in a beetle hybrid zone: causes of geographic variation in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles. (Masters Thesis). Western Washington University. Retrieved from https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/16

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zack, Rachel M S. “The evolution of mating cues in a beetle hybrid zone: causes of geographic variation in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles.” 2008. Masters Thesis, Western Washington University. Accessed January 25, 2020. https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/16.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zack, Rachel M S. “The evolution of mating cues in a beetle hybrid zone: causes of geographic variation in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles.” 2008. Web. 25 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Zack RMS. The evolution of mating cues in a beetle hybrid zone: causes of geographic variation in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Western Washington University; 2008. [cited 2020 Jan 25]. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/16.

Council of Science Editors:

Zack RMS. The evolution of mating cues in a beetle hybrid zone: causes of geographic variation in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles. [Masters Thesis]. Western Washington University; 2008. Available from: https://cedar.wwu.edu/wwuet/16

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