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You searched for +publisher:"Wayne State University" +contributor:("Chris Trentacosta"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Wayne State University

1. Upton, Frederick Warren. Teen Dating Violence: Attitudes And The Mediating Role Of Self-Control From A Social-Ecological Perspective.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2017, Wayne State University

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between Teen Dating Violence (TDV) attitudes and environmental and self-control constructs using structural equation models. First, adolescents (N=1236) attitudes about TDV were analyzed to determine if consistent distinct subtypes emerged. Distinct subtypes of TDV attitudes were identified: Very Unacceptable, Moderately Unacceptable, Verbal Aggression and Checking Behavior. Next the direct relationship between subtypes of TDV attitudes and self-control and environmental constructs, neighborhood disorganization, extracurricular activities and parental supervision, were investigated. TDV subtypes did indeed show unique relationships with environmental and self-control factors, further supporting the distinct types of teen dating violence (TDV). In particular, parental supervision associated with reduced tolerance for TDV, while self-centeredness, risk-seeking and low frustration tolerance self-control factors, as well as neighborhood disorganization were associated with greater tolerance for TDV. Finally, the potential mediation of the relationship between environmental constructs and TDV subtypes by self-control constructs was tested. Indirect effects of neighborhood disorganization on most subtypes of TDV were found to be mediated by self-centeredness. Parental supervision was directly associated with less tolerance for most types of TDV, but also showed strong indirect effects via greater reported frustration tolerance and less risk seeking. Implications for research, prevention and interventions on TDV are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Chris Trentacosta, Joanne Smith-Darden.

Subjects/Keywords: Self-Control; Teen Dating Violence; Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Upton, F. W. (2017). Teen Dating Violence: Attitudes And The Mediating Role Of Self-Control From A Social-Ecological Perspective. (Doctoral Dissertation). Wayne State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_dissertations/1885

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Upton, Frederick Warren. “Teen Dating Violence: Attitudes And The Mediating Role Of Self-Control From A Social-Ecological Perspective.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Wayne State University. Accessed April 19, 2019. https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_dissertations/1885.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Upton, Frederick Warren. “Teen Dating Violence: Attitudes And The Mediating Role Of Self-Control From A Social-Ecological Perspective.” 2017. Web. 19 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Upton FW. Teen Dating Violence: Attitudes And The Mediating Role Of Self-Control From A Social-Ecological Perspective. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Wayne State University; 2017. [cited 2019 Apr 19]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_dissertations/1885.

Council of Science Editors:

Upton FW. Teen Dating Violence: Attitudes And The Mediating Role Of Self-Control From A Social-Ecological Perspective. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Wayne State University; 2017. Available from: https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_dissertations/1885

2. Dexter, Casey. Family Socioeconomic Status And Children's Reading Ability: The Buffering Effect Of Parental Social Support.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2013, Wayne State University

The purpose of this study was to better understand the protective effect that social support has on the development of reading in children from a range of SES backgrounds. Because other studies have suggested the importance of teacher quality on children's reading ability, this was also tested. This study utilized a sample taken from the public-use version of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K), a large-scale, nationally representative sample of children attending kindergarten in the United States in the fall of the 1998-1999 academic year and their families, teachers, and schools. As expected, family SES and the availability of parental social support were important factors in determining children's reading ability. More specifically, when measured at concurrent time points, social support was found to have a unique buffering effect on the relationship between SES and children's reading ability such that higher amounts of parental social support served as a protective factor for the development of children's reading ability who were in lower SES family environments. Teacher quality as operationalized in the present study did not have a significant impact on the relationship between SES and children's reading ability. Latent growth mixture modeling was used to predict probable class membership in typologies of reading trajectories from the beginning of kindergarten through the end of eighth grade. Contrary to expectations, children's class membership in typology of reading trajectory over the school years was not found to vary by a combined measure of family SES and parental social support. The utility of conceptualizing parental social support as an integral contextual variable in the development of children's reading ability, especially those at-risk for reading delays, is discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Chris Trentacosta, Ann Stacks.

Subjects/Keywords: Low-SES; Reading; Social Support; Teacher Quality; Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dexter, C. (2013). Family Socioeconomic Status And Children's Reading Ability: The Buffering Effect Of Parental Social Support. (Doctoral Dissertation). Wayne State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_dissertations/759

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dexter, Casey. “Family Socioeconomic Status And Children's Reading Ability: The Buffering Effect Of Parental Social Support.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Wayne State University. Accessed April 19, 2019. https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_dissertations/759.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dexter, Casey. “Family Socioeconomic Status And Children's Reading Ability: The Buffering Effect Of Parental Social Support.” 2013. Web. 19 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Dexter C. Family Socioeconomic Status And Children's Reading Ability: The Buffering Effect Of Parental Social Support. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Wayne State University; 2013. [cited 2019 Apr 19]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_dissertations/759.

Council of Science Editors:

Dexter C. Family Socioeconomic Status And Children's Reading Ability: The Buffering Effect Of Parental Social Support. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Wayne State University; 2013. Available from: https://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_dissertations/759

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