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You searched for +publisher:"Virginia Tech" +contributor:("Wilson, Katherine E."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Virginia Tech

1. Blumerich, Celeste Ann. Comparison of Airway Response in Recurrent Airway Obstruction-Affected Horses Fed Steamed Versus Non-steamed Hay.

Degree: MS, Veterinary Medical Sciences, 2012, Virginia Tech

Recurrent Airway Obstruction (RAO)-affected horses experience bronchoconstriction and airway inflammation in response to inhalation of irritants including hay molds. Steaming hay reduces fungal content, but the effect on the antigenic potential has not been investigated. We tested the hypothesis that RAO-affected horses develop less severe clinical disease when fed steamed versus non-steamed hay and this reduction coincides with decreased hay fungal content. Six RAO-affected horses in clinical remission were divided in two groups and fed steamed or non-steamed hay for 10 days using a two-way cross-over design. Hay was steamed using a commercial hay-steamer. Clinical assessment was performed daily. Full assessment, including airway endoscopy, tracheal mucous scores and maximal change in pleural pressure, was performed on days 1, 5, and 10. Bronchial fluid sampling and cytology were performed on days 1 and 10. Hay core samples were collected pre- and post-steaming and cultured to determine fungal and bacterial concentrations. Statistical analysis was based on data distribution and quantity and performed using SAS®. P-value <0.05 was significant. Steaming significantly decreased the number of bacterial and fungal colony-forming-units in hay. Horses fed non-steamed hay experienced a significant increase in clinical score and a trend towards airway neutrophilia, while parameters were unchanged in horses fed steamed hay. Only horses fed non-steamed hay experienced a significant increase in tracheal mucous score. Horses fed steamed hay gained significantly more weight compared to horses fed non-steamed hay, even though the amount of hay consumed not greater on a dry matter basis. These results indicate that steaming reduces the RAO-affected horseâ s response to hay which coincides with a reduction in viable fungal content of hay. Advisors/Committee Members: Buechner-Maxwell, Virginia A. (committeechair), Pereira, Carolina Ricco (committee member), Hodgson, Jennifer L. (committee member), Scarratt, W. Kent (committee member), Wilson, Katherine E. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Recurrent Airway Obstruction; Hay; Steaming; Fungus; Horses

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Blumerich, C. A. (2012). Comparison of Airway Response in Recurrent Airway Obstruction-Affected Horses Fed Steamed Versus Non-steamed Hay. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/43534

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Blumerich, Celeste Ann. “Comparison of Airway Response in Recurrent Airway Obstruction-Affected Horses Fed Steamed Versus Non-steamed Hay.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed June 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/43534.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Blumerich, Celeste Ann. “Comparison of Airway Response in Recurrent Airway Obstruction-Affected Horses Fed Steamed Versus Non-steamed Hay.” 2012. Web. 15 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Blumerich CA. Comparison of Airway Response in Recurrent Airway Obstruction-Affected Horses Fed Steamed Versus Non-steamed Hay. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2012. [cited 2019 Jun 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/43534.

Council of Science Editors:

Blumerich CA. Comparison of Airway Response in Recurrent Airway Obstruction-Affected Horses Fed Steamed Versus Non-steamed Hay. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/43534

2. Mercer, Melissa Ann. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Acetaminophen in Adult Horses.

Degree: MS, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences, 2018, Virginia Tech

Due to the detrimental side effects of NSAID administration, such as gastrointestinal ulceration and renal papillary necrosis, there is a profound need for clinical pain relief in horses with long term orthopedic disease whereby gastrointestinal side effects are obviated. Acetaminophen is one of the most commonly used analgesic drugs in humans, and is readily available as an inexpensive generic over-the-counter preparation. Acetaminophen has a number of mechanisms of action that differ from NSAIDs, including actions on the serotonergic, opioid, endocannabinoid and lipoxygenase pathways. These alternate pathways may provide greater efficacy against chronic or neuropathic pain in equine patients. Acetaminophen was preferred by physicians over COX-2 and nonselective NSAIDs, even when those drugs were coupled with proton-pump inhibitors to reduce gastrointestinal side effects; due to cost considerations and the occurrence of adverse side effects from those drugs. In horses, acetaminophen has been reported to be efficacious as an adjunct treatment for laminitis in one pony, and was an effective analgesic agent when combined with NSAIDs in a model of inducible foot pain. However, no studies have been performed to validate a dose-response curve in horses. A study recently completed by our group demonstrated rapid absorption following oral administration of acetaminophen. Reported human therapeutic plasma concentrations were achieved within 30 minutes of administration, with no clinical or clinicopathologic evidence of adverse side effects after two weeks of repeated dosing. Dose simulation trials indicate that a change in dosage schedule may be required in order to provide adequate plasma concentrations. Advisors/Committee Members: McKenzie, Harold C. III (committeechair), Davis, Jennifer Lynn (committee member), McIntosh, Bridgett J. (committee member), Wilson, Katherine E. (committee member), Hodgson, David R. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Equine; Pain; Pharmacology; Acetaminophen; Paracetamol

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mercer, M. A. (2018). Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Acetaminophen in Adult Horses. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/85379

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mercer, Melissa Ann. “Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Acetaminophen in Adult Horses.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed June 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/85379.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mercer, Melissa Ann. “Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Acetaminophen in Adult Horses.” 2018. Web. 15 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Mercer MA. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Acetaminophen in Adult Horses. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2018. [cited 2019 Jun 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/85379.

Council of Science Editors:

Mercer MA. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Acetaminophen in Adult Horses. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/85379

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