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You searched for +publisher:"Virginia Tech" +contributor:("Samanta, Suchitra"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Raj, Anamika. The Unsafe Home:  An Analysis of Reported Domestic Violence in India.

Degree: MS, Sociology, 2019, Virginia Tech

Domestic violence is a global issue. It can be understood as arising from patriarchal values and gendered norms which relegate women to a subordinate position to men. India is the world’s largest democracy, and India is a place where crimes against women are highly prevalent. India enacted the Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act in 2005 in order to address the issue of domestic violence. This study examines the impact of the Act after 14 years of its passage. Domestic violence takes different forms ranging from physical, sexual, emotional, and psychological violence. This study focuses on two forms of domestic violence: dowry deaths and cruelty by husband and his relatives against the wife. It focuses on the analysis of reported cases of the two crimes. In this study, data from various Indian governmental websites have been collected and analyzed to demonstrate rates of domestic violence for all the states of India. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of women’s status—operationalized as female literacy rate and female workforce participation—on the number of reported cases of domestic violence in Indian society from 2001 to 2016. This study supports the ameliorative hypothesis, which argues that places in which women have higher status report lower rates of victimization. Advisors/Committee Members: Shoemaker, Donald J. (committeechair), Samanta, Suchitra (committee member), Boyle, Kaitlin Mary (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Domestic Violence; Dowry Deaths; Violence against women; Women's status; Gender equality

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Raj, A. (2019). The Unsafe Home:  An Analysis of Reported Domestic Violence in India. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/92197

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Raj, Anamika. “The Unsafe Home:  An Analysis of Reported Domestic Violence in India.” 2019. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/92197.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Raj, Anamika. “The Unsafe Home:  An Analysis of Reported Domestic Violence in India.” 2019. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Raj A. The Unsafe Home:  An Analysis of Reported Domestic Violence in India. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2019. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/92197.

Council of Science Editors:

Raj A. The Unsafe Home:  An Analysis of Reported Domestic Violence in India. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/92197

2. Islam, Inaash. Racialization of Muslim-American Women in Public and Private Spaces: An Analysis of their Racialized Identity and Strategies of Resistance.

Degree: MS, Sociology, 2017, Virginia Tech

The aim of this research project is to investigate how Muslim-American undergraduate women experience racialization in public and private spaces, examine whether those experiences give rise to a racialized identity, and highlight how they resist and cope with their racialization. The recent application of the term racialization to discuss the Muslim experience in the west has encouraged scholars such as Leon Moosavi, Saher Selod, Mythili Rajiva, Ming H. Chen and others, to engage in critical discourse within the scholarship of race and ethnicity regarding this often-neglected population. It is due to the unique, and gendered relationship that the female Muslim-American population has with the United States, particularly as a result of 9/11 and the label of 'oppressed' being imposed upon them, that it is important to comprehend how specifically Muslim-American women experience racialization. While these studies have broadened the understanding of how Muslims are, and continue to be othered, few studies have focused on the specific areas within public and private spaces where this marginalized group is racialized. This study attempts to fill this gap in existing research by examining how peers, mass media, educational institutions, law enforcement, family, and religious communities racialize Muslim-American women, and how these gendered experiences shape their racialized sense of self. In doing so, it also examines the impact of religious, racial, ethnic and cultural signifiers on the female Muslim-American experience of racialization, and demonstrates how these women employ certain strategies of resistance and coping mechanisms to deal with their racialization. Advisors/Committee Members: Brunsma, David L. (committeechair), Samanta, Suchitra (committee member), Graves, Ellington T. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Muslim American; racialization; spaces; racialized; identity; resistance

…of six undergraduate Muslim-American female students at Virginia Tech. Although race… …in-depth interviews of 6 female Muslim-American undergraduates at Virginia Tech, this… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Islam, I. (2017). Racialization of Muslim-American Women in Public and Private Spaces: An Analysis of their Racialized Identity and Strategies of Resistance. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77658

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Islam, Inaash. “Racialization of Muslim-American Women in Public and Private Spaces: An Analysis of their Racialized Identity and Strategies of Resistance.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77658.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Islam, Inaash. “Racialization of Muslim-American Women in Public and Private Spaces: An Analysis of their Racialized Identity and Strategies of Resistance.” 2017. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Islam I. Racialization of Muslim-American Women in Public and Private Spaces: An Analysis of their Racialized Identity and Strategies of Resistance. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77658.

Council of Science Editors:

Islam I. Racialization of Muslim-American Women in Public and Private Spaces: An Analysis of their Racialized Identity and Strategies of Resistance. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77658


Virginia Tech

3. Thompson, Joy Janetta. The Return: Understanding why Black Women Choose to "Go Natural".

Degree: MS, Sociology, 2018, Virginia Tech

The purpose of this study is to analyze and understand why some Black women in Greensboro, North Carolina have made the decision to wear their hair naturally, in its original kinky, curly, non-straightened form. I’ve chosen this topic because “in our society, long straight hair has generally been considered the gold standard for attractiveness” (Rosette & Dumas, 2007, p. 410) and by deviating from that gold standard, Black women are affected, personally and politically. In my perspective, it is important to understand why a woman would opt to make this choice, knowing the potential backlash she faces (i.e. losing her job, rejection in a romantic relationship, or school suspension). To facilitate this purpose, the guiding research inquiries included 10 questions about the woman’s hair journey, at different stages of her life: before perming, while perming, and going natural. In speaking with 10 women from three different generations, I found that the process of going natural is at once complex and simple, is simultaneously gradual and instant, both terrifying and liberating. Ultimately, I learned that even though various factors play a part in this process, “going natural” is a decision mostly directed and determined by the woman standing in the mirror. Advisors/Committee Members: Harrison, Anthony Kwame (committeechair), Precoda, Karl R. (committee member), Samanta, Suchitra (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Black girl magic; Africana Diaspora; Natural Hair; Natural Beauty; Black Hair; Going Natural; Black women; Greensboro; North Carolina; Perms; Relaxers

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Thompson, J. J. (2018). The Return: Understanding why Black Women Choose to "Go Natural". (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/95891

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Thompson, Joy Janetta. “The Return: Understanding why Black Women Choose to "Go Natural".” 2018. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed January 22, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/95891.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Thompson, Joy Janetta. “The Return: Understanding why Black Women Choose to "Go Natural".” 2018. Web. 22 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Thompson JJ. The Return: Understanding why Black Women Choose to "Go Natural". [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/95891.

Council of Science Editors:

Thompson JJ. The Return: Understanding why Black Women Choose to "Go Natural". [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/95891

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