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You searched for +publisher:"Virginia Tech" +contributor:("Renneckar, Scott H."). Showing records 1 – 11 of 11 total matches.

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Virginia Tech

1. Hosen, Joshua Carter. Fundamental Analysis of Wood Adhesion Primers.

Degree: MS, Wood Science and Forest Products, 2010, Virginia Tech

 Hydroxymethyl resorcinol (HMR) is an effective adhesion promoter (primer) for wood bonding; it dramatically improves adhesion and enhances bond durability against moisture exposure. In an… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: wood primers; hydroxymethyl resorcinol; solvent submersion dynamic mechanical analysis; rheology; mode-I fracture

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APA (6th Edition):

Hosen, J. C. (2010). Fundamental Analysis of Wood Adhesion Primers. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/76869

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hosen, Joshua Carter. “Fundamental Analysis of Wood Adhesion Primers.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/76869.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hosen, Joshua Carter. “Fundamental Analysis of Wood Adhesion Primers.” 2010. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hosen JC. Fundamental Analysis of Wood Adhesion Primers. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/76869.

Council of Science Editors:

Hosen JC. Fundamental Analysis of Wood Adhesion Primers. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/76869


Virginia Tech

2. Gao, Tian. Mode-I Fracture in Bonded Wood: Studies of Adhesive Thermal Stability, and of the Effects of Wood Surface Deactivation.

Degree: MS, Wood Science and Forest Products, 2010, Virginia Tech

 This work included two separate studies; the common theme in each was the use of mode-I fracture testing to evaluate wood adhesion. In the first… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Dual Cantilever Beam; Wood Adhesion; Thermal Stability; Fracture Testing

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APA (6th Edition):

Gao, T. (2010). Mode-I Fracture in Bonded Wood: Studies of Adhesive Thermal Stability, and of the Effects of Wood Surface Deactivation. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/31697

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gao, Tian. “Mode-I Fracture in Bonded Wood: Studies of Adhesive Thermal Stability, and of the Effects of Wood Surface Deactivation.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/31697.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gao, Tian. “Mode-I Fracture in Bonded Wood: Studies of Adhesive Thermal Stability, and of the Effects of Wood Surface Deactivation.” 2010. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Gao T. Mode-I Fracture in Bonded Wood: Studies of Adhesive Thermal Stability, and of the Effects of Wood Surface Deactivation. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/31697.

Council of Science Editors:

Gao T. Mode-I Fracture in Bonded Wood: Studies of Adhesive Thermal Stability, and of the Effects of Wood Surface Deactivation. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/31697


Virginia Tech

3. Jiang, Feng. Effects of the Non-ionic Surfactant Tween 80 on the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Model Cellulose and Lignocellulosic Substrates.

Degree: PhD, Macromolecular Science and Engineering, 2011, Virginia Tech

 Non-ionic surfactants are known to enhance the biochemical conversion of lignocellulosic (LC) biomass to bioethanol. Their mechanisms of action, however, are incompletely understood. This research… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: biomass; adsorption; bioethanol; cellulases; lignin; cellulose nanocrystals

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APA (6th Edition):

Jiang, F. (2011). Effects of the Non-ionic Surfactant Tween 80 on the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Model Cellulose and Lignocellulosic Substrates. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77223

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jiang, Feng. “Effects of the Non-ionic Surfactant Tween 80 on the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Model Cellulose and Lignocellulosic Substrates.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77223.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jiang, Feng. “Effects of the Non-ionic Surfactant Tween 80 on the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Model Cellulose and Lignocellulosic Substrates.” 2011. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Jiang F. Effects of the Non-ionic Surfactant Tween 80 on the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Model Cellulose and Lignocellulosic Substrates. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77223.

Council of Science Editors:

Jiang F. Effects of the Non-ionic Surfactant Tween 80 on the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Model Cellulose and Lignocellulosic Substrates. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77223


Virginia Tech

4. Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon. Lignocellulose Saccharification via Cellulose Solvent Based Fractionation Followed by Enzymatic Hydrolysis: the Last Obstacle to Integrated Biorefineries.

Degree: PhD, Biological Systems Engineering, 2011, Virginia Tech

 The production of biofuels and biobased products from low-cost abundant renewable non-food lignocellulosic biomass will be vital to sustainable development because it will bring benefits… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: biomass pretreatment; cellulose solvents; biofuels; enzymatic hydrolysis

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APA (6th Edition):

Sathitsuksanoh, N. (2011). Lignocellulose Saccharification via Cellulose Solvent Based Fractionation Followed by Enzymatic Hydrolysis: the Last Obstacle to Integrated Biorefineries. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77259

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon. “Lignocellulose Saccharification via Cellulose Solvent Based Fractionation Followed by Enzymatic Hydrolysis: the Last Obstacle to Integrated Biorefineries.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77259.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon. “Lignocellulose Saccharification via Cellulose Solvent Based Fractionation Followed by Enzymatic Hydrolysis: the Last Obstacle to Integrated Biorefineries.” 2011. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Sathitsuksanoh N. Lignocellulose Saccharification via Cellulose Solvent Based Fractionation Followed by Enzymatic Hydrolysis: the Last Obstacle to Integrated Biorefineries. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77259.

Council of Science Editors:

Sathitsuksanoh N. Lignocellulose Saccharification via Cellulose Solvent Based Fractionation Followed by Enzymatic Hydrolysis: the Last Obstacle to Integrated Biorefineries. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77259


Virginia Tech

5. Navarro, Fernando. Cellulose Nanocrystals: Size Characterization and Controlled Deposition by Inkjet Printing.

Degree: PhD, Macromolecular Science and Engineering, 2010, Virginia Tech

 Inkjet printing has generated considerable interest as a technique for the patterning of functional materials in the liquid phase onto a substrate. Despite its high… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Micropatterning; Streaming potential; XPS; Size distribution; AFM; Cellulose nanocrystals; Inkjet printing; Particle alignment

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APA (6th Edition):

Navarro, F. (2010). Cellulose Nanocrystals: Size Characterization and Controlled Deposition by Inkjet Printing. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/28337

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Navarro, Fernando. “Cellulose Nanocrystals: Size Characterization and Controlled Deposition by Inkjet Printing.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/28337.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Navarro, Fernando. “Cellulose Nanocrystals: Size Characterization and Controlled Deposition by Inkjet Printing.” 2010. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Navarro F. Cellulose Nanocrystals: Size Characterization and Controlled Deposition by Inkjet Printing. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/28337.

Council of Science Editors:

Navarro F. Cellulose Nanocrystals: Size Characterization and Controlled Deposition by Inkjet Printing. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/28337


Virginia Tech

6. Johnson, Richard Kwesi. TEMPO-oxidized Nanocelluloses: Surface Modification and use as Additives in Cellulosic Nanocomposites.

Degree: PhD, Macromolecular Science and Engineering, 2010, Virginia Tech

 The process of TEMPO-mediated oxidation has gained broad usage towards the preparation of highly charged, carboxyl-functionalized polysaccharides. TEMPO-oxidized nanocelluloses (TONc) of high surface charge and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: ionic complexation; amidation; octadecylamine; surface modification; nanocomposite; TEMPO-oxidized; nanocellulose; thermal decomposition

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APA (6th Edition):

Johnson, R. K. (2010). TEMPO-oxidized Nanocelluloses: Surface Modification and use as Additives in Cellulosic Nanocomposites. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29342

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Johnson, Richard Kwesi. “TEMPO-oxidized Nanocelluloses: Surface Modification and use as Additives in Cellulosic Nanocomposites.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29342.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Johnson, Richard Kwesi. “TEMPO-oxidized Nanocelluloses: Surface Modification and use as Additives in Cellulosic Nanocomposites.” 2010. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Johnson RK. TEMPO-oxidized Nanocelluloses: Surface Modification and use as Additives in Cellulosic Nanocomposites. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29342.

Council of Science Editors:

Johnson RK. TEMPO-oxidized Nanocelluloses: Surface Modification and use as Additives in Cellulosic Nanocomposites. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29342


Virginia Tech

7. Chowdhury, Sudip. Advancing characterization techniques for structure-property determination of in-situ lignocelluloses.

Degree: PhD, Macromolecular Science and Engineering, 2011, Virginia Tech

 The global progression towards sustainable energy, materials and chemicals requires novel and improved analytical tools to understand and optimize lignocellulosic biomass utilization. In an effort… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: biomass fractionation; wood-adhesion promoter; infrared spectroscopy; NMR; quadrupolar interaction; DMA

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APA (6th Edition):

Chowdhury, S. (2011). Advancing characterization techniques for structure-property determination of in-situ lignocelluloses. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/39189

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chowdhury, Sudip. “Advancing characterization techniques for structure-property determination of in-situ lignocelluloses.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/39189.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chowdhury, Sudip. “Advancing characterization techniques for structure-property determination of in-situ lignocelluloses.” 2011. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Chowdhury S. Advancing characterization techniques for structure-property determination of in-situ lignocelluloses. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/39189.

Council of Science Editors:

Chowdhury S. Advancing characterization techniques for structure-property determination of in-situ lignocelluloses. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/39189


Virginia Tech

8. Hong, Jung Ki. Effect of Cellulose Nanocrystals on the Rheology, Curing Behavior, and Fracture Performance of Phenol-Formaldehyde Resol Resin.

Degree: MS, Wood Science and Forest Products, 2009, Virginia Tech

 The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), as potential additives, on the properties and performance of phenolâ formaldehyde… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: viscosity; fracture testing; phenol formaldehyde resin; cellulose nanocrystals; dynamic mechanical analysis; differential scanning calorimetry; rheology

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APA (6th Edition):

Hong, J. K. (2009). Effect of Cellulose Nanocrystals on the Rheology, Curing Behavior, and Fracture Performance of Phenol-Formaldehyde Resol Resin. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/46189

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hong, Jung Ki. “Effect of Cellulose Nanocrystals on the Rheology, Curing Behavior, and Fracture Performance of Phenol-Formaldehyde Resol Resin.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/46189.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hong, Jung Ki. “Effect of Cellulose Nanocrystals on the Rheology, Curing Behavior, and Fracture Performance of Phenol-Formaldehyde Resol Resin.” 2009. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hong JK. Effect of Cellulose Nanocrystals on the Rheology, Curing Behavior, and Fracture Performance of Phenol-Formaldehyde Resol Resin. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/46189.

Council of Science Editors:

Hong JK. Effect of Cellulose Nanocrystals on the Rheology, Curing Behavior, and Fracture Performance of Phenol-Formaldehyde Resol Resin. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/46189


Virginia Tech

9. Li, Zhuo. Bio-based composites that mimic the plant cell wall.

Degree: MS, Biological Systems Engineering, 2009, Virginia Tech

 Nature creates high performance materials under modest conditions, i.e., neutral pH and ambient temperature and pressure. One of the most significant materials is the plant… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: morphology; nanocellulose; nanocomposite; enzymatic polymerization

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APA (6th Edition):

Li, Z. (2009). Bio-based composites that mimic the plant cell wall. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/32088

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Li, Zhuo. “Bio-based composites that mimic the plant cell wall.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/32088.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Li, Zhuo. “Bio-based composites that mimic the plant cell wall.” 2009. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Li Z. Bio-based composites that mimic the plant cell wall. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/32088.

Council of Science Editors:

Li Z. Bio-based composites that mimic the plant cell wall. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/32088


Virginia Tech

10. Zhu, Zhiguang. Investigating biomass saccharification for the production of cellulosic ethanol.

Degree: MS, Biological Systems Engineering, 2009, Virginia Tech

 The production of second generation biofuels  – cellulosic ethanol from renewable lignocellulosic biomass has the potential to lead the bioindustrial revolution necessary to the transition… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: cellulase recycling; adsorbed cellulase assay; cellulose accessibility; biofuels; pretreatment

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APA (6th Edition):

Zhu, Z. (2009). Investigating biomass saccharification for the production of cellulosic ethanol. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/32189

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhu, Zhiguang. “Investigating biomass saccharification for the production of cellulosic ethanol.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/32189.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhu, Zhiguang. “Investigating biomass saccharification for the production of cellulosic ethanol.” 2009. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Zhu Z. Investigating biomass saccharification for the production of cellulosic ethanol. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/32189.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhu Z. Investigating biomass saccharification for the production of cellulosic ethanol. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/32189


Virginia Tech

11. Wang, Hezhong. Chitosan-Cellulose Nanocrystal Polyelectrolyte Complex Particles: Preparation, Characterization, and In Vitro Drug Release Properties.

Degree: PhD, Wood Science and Forest Products, 2009, Virginia Tech

 Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) between chitosan, a mucoadhesive, intestinal mucosal permeability-enhancing polysaccharide, and cellulose nanocrystals, rod-like cellulose nanoparticles with sulfate groups on their surface, have potential… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: drug delivery; polyelectrolyte complex; chitosan; cellulose nanocsrystals; caffeine; ibuprofen

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APA (6th Edition):

Wang, H. (2009). Chitosan-Cellulose Nanocrystal Polyelectrolyte Complex Particles: Preparation, Characterization, and In Vitro Drug Release Properties. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/40353

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wang, Hezhong. “Chitosan-Cellulose Nanocrystal Polyelectrolyte Complex Particles: Preparation, Characterization, and In Vitro Drug Release Properties.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed October 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/40353.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wang, Hezhong. “Chitosan-Cellulose Nanocrystal Polyelectrolyte Complex Particles: Preparation, Characterization, and In Vitro Drug Release Properties.” 2009. Web. 22 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Wang H. Chitosan-Cellulose Nanocrystal Polyelectrolyte Complex Particles: Preparation, Characterization, and In Vitro Drug Release Properties. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/40353.

Council of Science Editors:

Wang H. Chitosan-Cellulose Nanocrystal Polyelectrolyte Complex Particles: Preparation, Characterization, and In Vitro Drug Release Properties. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/40353

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