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You searched for +publisher:"Virginia Tech" +contributor:("Ponder, Monica A."). Showing records 1 – 11 of 11 total matches.

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Virginia Tech

1. Pesapane, Risa Raelene. Tracking Pathogen Transmission at the Human-Wildlife Interface: Banded Mongoose (Mungos mungo) and Escherichia coli as a Model System in Chobe, Botswana.

Degree: MS, Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, 2011, Virginia Tech

 Anthropozoonotic diseases, defined as infectious diseases caused by pathogens transmitted from humans to wildlife, pose a significant health threat to wildlife populations. Many of these… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: antibiotic resistance; anthropozoonotic; fecal waste; Escherichia coli; pathogen transmission

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APA (6th Edition):

Pesapane, R. R. (2011). Tracking Pathogen Transmission at the Human-Wildlife Interface: Banded Mongoose (Mungos mungo) and Escherichia coli as a Model System in Chobe, Botswana. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/76930

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pesapane, Risa Raelene. “Tracking Pathogen Transmission at the Human-Wildlife Interface: Banded Mongoose (Mungos mungo) and Escherichia coli as a Model System in Chobe, Botswana.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed September 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/76930.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pesapane, Risa Raelene. “Tracking Pathogen Transmission at the Human-Wildlife Interface: Banded Mongoose (Mungos mungo) and Escherichia coli as a Model System in Chobe, Botswana.” 2011. Web. 27 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Pesapane RR. Tracking Pathogen Transmission at the Human-Wildlife Interface: Banded Mongoose (Mungos mungo) and Escherichia coli as a Model System in Chobe, Botswana. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2011. [cited 2020 Sep 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/76930.

Council of Science Editors:

Pesapane RR. Tracking Pathogen Transmission at the Human-Wildlife Interface: Banded Mongoose (Mungos mungo) and Escherichia coli as a Model System in Chobe, Botswana. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/76930


Virginia Tech

2. Schroeder, Matthew William. Association of Campylobacter spp. Levels between Chicken Grow-Out Environmental Samples and Processed Carcasses.

Degree: MSin Life Sciences, Food Science and Technology, 2012, Virginia Tech

 Campylobacter spp. have been isolated from live poultry, production environment, processing facility, and raw poultry products. The detection of Campylobacter using both quantitative and qualitative… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Campylobacter; environmental sampling; single flock; poultry

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APA (6th Edition):

Schroeder, M. W. (2012). Association of Campylobacter spp. Levels between Chicken Grow-Out Environmental Samples and Processed Carcasses. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/32169

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schroeder, Matthew William. “Association of Campylobacter spp. Levels between Chicken Grow-Out Environmental Samples and Processed Carcasses.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed September 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/32169.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schroeder, Matthew William. “Association of Campylobacter spp. Levels between Chicken Grow-Out Environmental Samples and Processed Carcasses.” 2012. Web. 27 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Schroeder MW. Association of Campylobacter spp. Levels between Chicken Grow-Out Environmental Samples and Processed Carcasses. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2012. [cited 2020 Sep 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/32169.

Council of Science Editors:

Schroeder MW. Association of Campylobacter spp. Levels between Chicken Grow-Out Environmental Samples and Processed Carcasses. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/32169


Virginia Tech

3. Lee, Hanbae. Impact of exogenous factors on amino acid digestibility in non-ruminants.

Degree: PhD, Animal and Poultry Sciences, 2012, Virginia Tech

 The nutritional value of an amino acid (AA) is determined by its bioavailability, however concept of digestibility is mostly used in practical situations. Four studies… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: amino acids; pigs; broilers; DDGS; carbohydrase; Salmonella Typhimurium

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APA (6th Edition):

Lee, H. (2012). Impact of exogenous factors on amino acid digestibility in non-ruminants. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/27667

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lee, Hanbae. “Impact of exogenous factors on amino acid digestibility in non-ruminants.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed September 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/27667.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lee, Hanbae. “Impact of exogenous factors on amino acid digestibility in non-ruminants.” 2012. Web. 27 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Lee H. Impact of exogenous factors on amino acid digestibility in non-ruminants. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2012. [cited 2020 Sep 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/27667.

Council of Science Editors:

Lee H. Impact of exogenous factors on amino acid digestibility in non-ruminants. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/27667


Virginia Tech

4. Carder, Phyllis. Microbial Communities of Spinach at Various Stages of Plant Growth From Seed to Maturity.

Degree: MSin Life Sciences, Food Science and Technology, 2010, Virginia Tech

  Little is known about how the leaf bacterial community is affected by the seed microbiota at different stages of plant development. The bacterial populations… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: microbial antagonism; microbial diversity; microbial abundance; microbial community; spinach

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APA (6th Edition):

Carder, P. (2010). Microbial Communities of Spinach at Various Stages of Plant Growth From Seed to Maturity. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/34104

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Carder, Phyllis. “Microbial Communities of Spinach at Various Stages of Plant Growth From Seed to Maturity.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed September 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/34104.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Carder, Phyllis. “Microbial Communities of Spinach at Various Stages of Plant Growth From Seed to Maturity.” 2010. Web. 27 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Carder P. Microbial Communities of Spinach at Various Stages of Plant Growth From Seed to Maturity. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2010. [cited 2020 Sep 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/34104.

Council of Science Editors:

Carder P. Microbial Communities of Spinach at Various Stages of Plant Growth From Seed to Maturity. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/34104


Virginia Tech

5. Carder, Phyllis. Microbial Communities of Spinach at Various Stages of Plant Growth From Seed to Maturity.

Degree: MS, Horticulture, 2010, Virginia Tech

  Little is known about how the leaf bacterial community is affected by the seed microbiota at different stages of plant development. The bacterial populations… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: microbial antagonism; microbial diversity; microbial abundance; microbial community; spinach

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APA (6th Edition):

Carder, P. (2010). Microbial Communities of Spinach at Various Stages of Plant Growth From Seed to Maturity. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/34211

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Carder, Phyllis. “Microbial Communities of Spinach at Various Stages of Plant Growth From Seed to Maturity.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed September 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/34211.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Carder, Phyllis. “Microbial Communities of Spinach at Various Stages of Plant Growth From Seed to Maturity.” 2010. Web. 27 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Carder P. Microbial Communities of Spinach at Various Stages of Plant Growth From Seed to Maturity. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2010. [cited 2020 Sep 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/34211.

Council of Science Editors:

Carder P. Microbial Communities of Spinach at Various Stages of Plant Growth From Seed to Maturity. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/34211


Virginia Tech

6. Wen, Ke. Mechanisms of Immunomodulation By Probiotics: Influence of Lactobacilli On Innate and T Cell Immune Responses Induced By Rotavirus Infection and Vaccines.

Degree: PhD, Veterinary Medical Sciences, 2011, Virginia Tech

 My dissertation research focused on studying mechanisms of immunomodulation by probiotic lactobacilli on innate and T cell immune responses induced by rotavirus infection and vaccines… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: rotaviruses; gd T cells; lactobacilli; innate and adaptive immunity; gnotobiotic pigs

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APA (6th Edition):

Wen, K. (2011). Mechanisms of Immunomodulation By Probiotics: Influence of Lactobacilli On Innate and T Cell Immune Responses Induced By Rotavirus Infection and Vaccines. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77243

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wen, Ke. “Mechanisms of Immunomodulation By Probiotics: Influence of Lactobacilli On Innate and T Cell Immune Responses Induced By Rotavirus Infection and Vaccines.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed September 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77243.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wen, Ke. “Mechanisms of Immunomodulation By Probiotics: Influence of Lactobacilli On Innate and T Cell Immune Responses Induced By Rotavirus Infection and Vaccines.” 2011. Web. 27 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Wen K. Mechanisms of Immunomodulation By Probiotics: Influence of Lactobacilli On Innate and T Cell Immune Responses Induced By Rotavirus Infection and Vaccines. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2011. [cited 2020 Sep 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77243.

Council of Science Editors:

Wen K. Mechanisms of Immunomodulation By Probiotics: Influence of Lactobacilli On Innate and T Cell Immune Responses Induced By Rotavirus Infection and Vaccines. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77243


Virginia Tech

7. Lopez-Velasco, Gabriela. Molecular Characterization of Spinach (Spinacia Oleracea) Microbial Community Structure and its Interaction With Escherichia Coli O157:H7 in Modified Atmosphere Conditions.

Degree: PhD, Food Science and Technology, 2010, Virginia Tech

 Leafy greens like lettuce and spinach are a common vehicle for foodborne illness in United States. It is unknown if native plant epiphytic bacteria may… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: microbial diversity; bacterial interaction; microbial community; spinach

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APA (6th Edition):

Lopez-Velasco, G. (2010). Molecular Characterization of Spinach (Spinacia Oleracea) Microbial Community Structure and its Interaction With Escherichia Coli O157:H7 in Modified Atmosphere Conditions. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/37601

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lopez-Velasco, Gabriela. “Molecular Characterization of Spinach (Spinacia Oleracea) Microbial Community Structure and its Interaction With Escherichia Coli O157:H7 in Modified Atmosphere Conditions.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed September 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/37601.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lopez-Velasco, Gabriela. “Molecular Characterization of Spinach (Spinacia Oleracea) Microbial Community Structure and its Interaction With Escherichia Coli O157:H7 in Modified Atmosphere Conditions.” 2010. Web. 27 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Lopez-Velasco G. Molecular Characterization of Spinach (Spinacia Oleracea) Microbial Community Structure and its Interaction With Escherichia Coli O157:H7 in Modified Atmosphere Conditions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2010. [cited 2020 Sep 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/37601.

Council of Science Editors:

Lopez-Velasco G. Molecular Characterization of Spinach (Spinacia Oleracea) Microbial Community Structure and its Interaction With Escherichia Coli O157:H7 in Modified Atmosphere Conditions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/37601


Virginia Tech

8. Shepherd, Megan Leigh. The Utility of Culture Independent Methods to Evaluate the Fecal Microbiome in Overweight Horses Fed Orchard Grass Hay.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical and Veterinary Sciences, 2012, Virginia Tech

 This dissertation documents efforts to evaluate metabolic variables and the fecal microbiome in adult horses fed grass hay. In the first study, eight Arabian geldings… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: obesity; feces; 16S rRNA gene; DGGE; real time PCR; pyrosequencing; horse; body condition score; overweight; microbiome

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APA (6th Edition):

Shepherd, M. L. (2012). The Utility of Culture Independent Methods to Evaluate the Fecal Microbiome in Overweight Horses Fed Orchard Grass Hay. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77189

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Shepherd, Megan Leigh. “The Utility of Culture Independent Methods to Evaluate the Fecal Microbiome in Overweight Horses Fed Orchard Grass Hay.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed September 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77189.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Shepherd, Megan Leigh. “The Utility of Culture Independent Methods to Evaluate the Fecal Microbiome in Overweight Horses Fed Orchard Grass Hay.” 2012. Web. 27 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Shepherd ML. The Utility of Culture Independent Methods to Evaluate the Fecal Microbiome in Overweight Horses Fed Orchard Grass Hay. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2012. [cited 2020 Sep 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77189.

Council of Science Editors:

Shepherd ML. The Utility of Culture Independent Methods to Evaluate the Fecal Microbiome in Overweight Horses Fed Orchard Grass Hay. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/77189


Virginia Tech

9. Kuntz, Thomas James. Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella spp. Detection in Chicken Grow Out Houses by Environmental Sampling Methods.

Degree: MS, Food Science and Technology, 2009, Virginia Tech

 Campylobacter and Salmonella are foodborne pathogens commonly associated with raw poultry. Although there has been much research done on isolating these pathogens from poultry production… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: gelatin filters; poultry; air sampling; environmental sampling; Salmonella; Campylobacter

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APA (6th Edition):

Kuntz, T. J. (2009). Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella spp. Detection in Chicken Grow Out Houses by Environmental Sampling Methods. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/42526

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kuntz, Thomas James. “Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella spp. Detection in Chicken Grow Out Houses by Environmental Sampling Methods.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed September 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/42526.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kuntz, Thomas James. “Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella spp. Detection in Chicken Grow Out Houses by Environmental Sampling Methods.” 2009. Web. 27 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Kuntz TJ. Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella spp. Detection in Chicken Grow Out Houses by Environmental Sampling Methods. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2009. [cited 2020 Sep 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/42526.

Council of Science Editors:

Kuntz TJ. Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella spp. Detection in Chicken Grow Out Houses by Environmental Sampling Methods. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/42526


Virginia Tech

10. Davis, Marjorie Lynn. Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on cut and whole surfaces of spinach and leaf lettuce, packaged under modified atmospheric conditions.

Degree: MSin Life Sciences, Food Science and Technology, 2008, Virginia Tech

 Numerous food-borne outbreaks of Escherichia coli O157:H7 have been linked to leafy greens in recent years. An overwhelming amount of lettuce and spinach on the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: E. coli O157:H7; Spinach; Lettuce; Modified Atmosphere Packaging

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APA (6th Edition):

Davis, M. L. (2008). Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on cut and whole surfaces of spinach and leaf lettuce, packaged under modified atmospheric conditions. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/34925

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Davis, Marjorie Lynn. “Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on cut and whole surfaces of spinach and leaf lettuce, packaged under modified atmospheric conditions.” 2008. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed September 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/34925.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Davis, Marjorie Lynn. “Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on cut and whole surfaces of spinach and leaf lettuce, packaged under modified atmospheric conditions.” 2008. Web. 27 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Davis ML. Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on cut and whole surfaces of spinach and leaf lettuce, packaged under modified atmospheric conditions. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2008. [cited 2020 Sep 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/34925.

Council of Science Editors:

Davis ML. Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on cut and whole surfaces of spinach and leaf lettuce, packaged under modified atmospheric conditions. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/34925


Virginia Tech

11. Hintz, Leslie Diane. Association of Salmonella enterica serotype Newport with Tomato Plants through Irrigation Water, Grown under Controlled Environmental Conditions.

Degree: MS, Food Science and Technology, 2008, Virginia Tech

 Tomato fruit have been associated with numerous outbreaks of salmonellosis in recent years. Trace back suggests tomato fruit may become contaminated during pre-harvest, however exact… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Tomato; Salmonella; irrigation water

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APA (6th Edition):

Hintz, L. D. (2008). Association of Salmonella enterica serotype Newport with Tomato Plants through Irrigation Water, Grown under Controlled Environmental Conditions. (Masters Thesis). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/35956

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hintz, Leslie Diane. “Association of Salmonella enterica serotype Newport with Tomato Plants through Irrigation Water, Grown under Controlled Environmental Conditions.” 2008. Masters Thesis, Virginia Tech. Accessed September 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/35956.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hintz, Leslie Diane. “Association of Salmonella enterica serotype Newport with Tomato Plants through Irrigation Water, Grown under Controlled Environmental Conditions.” 2008. Web. 27 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Hintz LD. Association of Salmonella enterica serotype Newport with Tomato Plants through Irrigation Water, Grown under Controlled Environmental Conditions. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2008. [cited 2020 Sep 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/35956.

Council of Science Editors:

Hintz LD. Association of Salmonella enterica serotype Newport with Tomato Plants through Irrigation Water, Grown under Controlled Environmental Conditions. [Masters Thesis]. Virginia Tech; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/35956

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