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You searched for +publisher:"Virginia Tech" +contributor:("Jones, Roy S."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Virginia Tech

1. Chapman, Paul Eugene. Multiple Community Services: One Family's Experience.

Degree: PhD, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, 1999, Virginia Tech

Multiple Community Services: One Family's Experience Paul E. Chapman ABSTRACT The family support movement in the United States has its roots in the early years of the 20th century when progressives like Jane Addams worked to improve the lives of disadvantaged children and their families. Family support today is provided by multiple public and private agencies. How families experience these services is not well known. Such information could help service providers give meaningful support to those in need. This is a case study of how one family experienced the receipt of multiple community services. The family lived in Virginia, and four family members participated in the study. The family consisted of Elizabeth, the matriarch, age 39; Allen, third husband of Elizabeth, age 30; Bradley, middle son of Elizabeth, age 16; and Benjamin, youngest son of Elizabeth, age 14. Elizabeth's eldest son C. C., age 18, did not participate in the study. The services received by the family were focused on Elizabeth, a childhood victim of parental abuse and a cancer survivor, and Bradley, who was identified with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Bradley was a resident in a wilderness program for at-risk boys. The wilderness program was partially funded by the Virginia Comprehensive Services Act. The study had four purposes: (1) to inform policy makers about how families are affected by policy decisions on issues pertaining to families, (2) to influence the decisions of policy makers, (3) to add to the definition of quality family support, and (4) to provide information useful to educators and service providers in developing programs for at-risk children and families. Data sources were observations of, and interviews with, family members. Data were analyzed with the constant comparative method as described by Maykut and Morehouse (1994). The analysis and findings are presented in a narrative report. Advisors/Committee Members: Parks, David J. (committeechair), Parson, Stephen R. (committee member), Crockett, Jean B. (committee member), Jones, Roy S. (committee member), Dawson, Christina M. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: case study; multiple services; family support; community agencies

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APA (6th Edition):

Chapman, P. E. (1999). Multiple Community Services: One Family's Experience. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29813

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chapman, Paul Eugene. “Multiple Community Services: One Family's Experience.” 1999. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed June 25, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29813.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chapman, Paul Eugene. “Multiple Community Services: One Family's Experience.” 1999. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Chapman PE. Multiple Community Services: One Family's Experience. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 1999. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29813.

Council of Science Editors:

Chapman PE. Multiple Community Services: One Family's Experience. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 1999. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29813


Virginia Tech

2. Anderson, Myron R. An Examination of Nonverbal Cues Used By University Professors When Delivering Instruction in a Two-Way Video Classroom.

Degree: PhD, Instructional Technology, 2001, Virginia Tech

As the education field further embraces technology and the classroom develops a distance component, more and more colleges and universities are delivering classes via two-way video. Research has established that nonverbal cues exist and play a significant role in classroom instruction (Arnold & Roach, 1989; Cyrs, Conway, Shonk, & Jones, 1997; Rosenthal & Jacobson, 1968). The growing popularity of two-way video and the fundamental concepts of communication, establishes a parallel between traditional classroom and two-way video instruction delivery. This parallel and the established effect that nonverbal cues have on instructional delivery support the need to study nonverbal communication in a two-way video classroom. Descriptive observation of six instructors, each teaching five 50-minute lectures, produced the data for this preliminary study. The nonverbal cues were recorded using the Two-way Video Nonverbal Cue Observation Instrument (TV-NCOI). The TV-NCOI consisted of seven nonverbal communication categories and 22 variables used to identify and quantify professor's nonverbal cue use in two-way video instructional delivery. Frequency response, common themes, and nonverbal cue delivery observations, collected by the TV-NCOI, were used to answer the research questions; what nonverbal cues are used by university professors when delivering instruction in a two-way video classroom? The results suggest that professors in engineering and chemistry, the two focused disciplines, heavily used nonverbal cues when delivering instruction in a two-way video classroom. However, the majority of these cues have a technical delivery base. The traditional classroom nonverbal cues of board pointing, material pointing, and accent gestures are delivered via computer cursor, two-way video camera, and software applications in the two-way video classroom. More specifically, 87% on the nonverbal cues used in instructional delivery had a technological connection and only 13% of the nonverbal cues used were without a technical delivery base. Advisors/Committee Members: Burton, John Knox (committeechair), Magliaro, Susan G. (committee member), Lockee, Barbara B. (committee member), Moore, David Michael (committee member), Jones, Roy S. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: distance education; instructional delivery; technology; nonverbal communication; two-way video

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Anderson, M. R. (2001). An Examination of Nonverbal Cues Used By University Professors When Delivering Instruction in a Two-Way Video Classroom. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29966

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Anderson, Myron R. “An Examination of Nonverbal Cues Used By University Professors When Delivering Instruction in a Two-Way Video Classroom.” 2001. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed June 25, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29966.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Anderson, Myron R. “An Examination of Nonverbal Cues Used By University Professors When Delivering Instruction in a Two-Way Video Classroom.” 2001. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Anderson MR. An Examination of Nonverbal Cues Used By University Professors When Delivering Instruction in a Two-Way Video Classroom. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2001. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29966.

Council of Science Editors:

Anderson MR. An Examination of Nonverbal Cues Used By University Professors When Delivering Instruction in a Two-Way Video Classroom. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2001. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29966


Virginia Tech

3. Meadows, Robert Ray. History of Virginia's 4-H Camping Program: A Case Study on Events Leading to the Development of the 4-H Educational Centers.

Degree: PhD, Education Administration, 1997, Virginia Tech

Residential camping has long been used as a tool to reach and teach educational concepts to youth. Since the founding of the first organized residential camp in 1823 at Round Hill School's Summer Camp in Massachusetts, private and public organizations have used camping as a means to teach youth their respective missions and goals. Although a relative newcomer in the camping business when compared to other agencies and groups, 4-H has been involved in camping since the first county camp was conducted in 1915. Virginia has long been in the business of 4-H camping, reaching thousands of youth throughout the years on an annual basis. Now, ranked third nationally in total numbers of youth attending 4-H camping on an annual basis, the 4-H mission "...assisting youth, and adults working with those youth, to gain additional knowledge, life skills, and attitudes that further their development as self-directing, contributing, and productive members of society" continues to be carried out through the residential camping program. The purpose of this dissertation is to describe, record and analyze the concept that provided the foundation for the Virginia 4-H camping program becoming a reality of the 4-H educational centers. It includes the early history of the camping movement in the United States, the beginnings of the 4-H club program in the United States and Virginia, and 4-H involvement in reaching and involving youth audiences through camping programs. The population for this study consisted of early pioneers in the 4-H camping program representing Virginia Cooperative Extension administrators and extension agents, camp staffs, and campers from both white and African-American camping programs, as separate 4-H camping programs were conducted. A systematic document research and structured interviews of the early pioneers was conducted to reach defensible conclusions about the establishment, operation, and purpose of the 4- H camping movement in Virginia. The outcomes of this study are fourfold. First, the study serves to document the organized camping movement in the United States and the beginnings of 4-H. Second, the study explores the early beginnings of the 4-H camping movement in the country with the national 4-H camping movement. Third, the study examined the persons, events, founding and early development of the 4-H camping program in Virginia, including the separate white and African-American camping programs for Whites and African-Americans. Fourth, the study documented the history of Virginia's six 4-H educational centers. The study endeavors to contribute to the body of knowledge concerning the history of the 4-H movement in Virginia. Advisors/Committee Members: Parson, Stephen R. (committeechair), Worner, Wayne Dempsey (committee member), Richards, Robert R. (committee member), Jones, Roy S. (committee member), Hunt, Thomas C. (committeecochair).

Subjects/Keywords: 4-H; camping; cooperative extension; virginia; 4-H educational centers

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Meadows, R. R. (1997). History of Virginia's 4-H Camping Program: A Case Study on Events Leading to the Development of the 4-H Educational Centers. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/30597

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Meadows, Robert Ray. “History of Virginia's 4-H Camping Program: A Case Study on Events Leading to the Development of the 4-H Educational Centers.” 1997. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed June 25, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/30597.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Meadows, Robert Ray. “History of Virginia's 4-H Camping Program: A Case Study on Events Leading to the Development of the 4-H Educational Centers.” 1997. Web. 25 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Meadows RR. History of Virginia's 4-H Camping Program: A Case Study on Events Leading to the Development of the 4-H Educational Centers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 1997. [cited 2019 Jun 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/30597.

Council of Science Editors:

Meadows RR. History of Virginia's 4-H Camping Program: A Case Study on Events Leading to the Development of the 4-H Educational Centers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 1997. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/30597

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