Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Virginia Tech" +contributor:("Hudlicka, Eva"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Virginia Tech

1. Lee, William. The Influence of Emotion on the Risk Perception and Situation Awareness of Clinicians.

Degree: PhD, Industrial and Systems Engineering, 2009, Virginia Tech

The objective of this exploratory research was to investigate the interplay among emotion, risk perception, and situation awareness as potential risk factors within the health care domain. To accomplish this objective, a two-phase study approach was employed. In Phase I, a proof-of-concept testbed of the emotional interface concept, namely Wearable Avatar Risk Display (WARD), was tested as the primary communication medium to explore participants' emotional responses and risk choices under the influence of the validated International Affective Picture System (IAPS). Based on the lessons learned, a limited prototype of WARD was further refined and then implemented in a formative evaluation. The formative evaluation employed two medical students from the Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM) to investigate their emotional response, risk perception, and situation awareness using the MicroSim InHospital under the influence of the validated film-based Mood Induction Procedures (MIPs). In Phase II, 32 new medical students from VCOM participated in 2 (intervention) x 2 (film) between-subjects study for addressing three research questions. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed. Results from Phase I indicated the need for MIPs, as well as shed light on the feasibility of employing anthropomorphic computer characters as intervention devices. Participants found anthropomorphic computer characters to be meaningful as virtual assistants in a team environment. The Facial Expression Coding System also indicated that participants experienced high levels of happiness/amusement when a happy and credible anthropomorphic computer character was introduced under angry emotional induction via MIPs. Physiological states results confirmed that participants' heart rate variability was affected significantly after the use of anthropomorphic computer characters, verifying that their utilization was potentially effective. The lessons I learned from the Phase I results led me to refine procedures and training/evaluation techniques, and to introduce anthropomorphic computer characters with minimal intrusiveness during the Phase II study. Findings from Phase II showed that one particular medical item, wiping contaminated spills, was found to be influenced by induced anger. Moreover, mixed support for using anthropomorphic computer characters and text interventions was also found for the medical and general risk perception ratings under induced anger. Sub-constructs within 3-D SART correlated with emotional responses and anthropomorphic computer character intervention. Two additional items, supply of attention and complexity of the situation, were also found to be influenced by anthropomorphic computer character intervention. Content analysis using the Word-Frequency List method resulted in positive responses for both anthropomorphic computer character and text interventions. Using Two-sample t tests, text based interventions led to a higher level of subjective happiness as measured by PANAS-X. … Advisors/Committee Members: Quek, Francis K. H. (committee member), Hudlicka, Eva (committee member), Kleiner, Brian M. (committee member), Smith-Jackson, Tonya L. (committeecochair), Winchester, Woodrow W. III (committeecochair).

Subjects/Keywords: Situation Awareness; Emotion; Health Care; Human-Computer Interaction; Anthropomorphic Computer Character; Risk Perception; Decision Making

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lee, W. (2009). The Influence of Emotion on the Risk Perception and Situation Awareness of Clinicians. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/26830

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lee, William. “The Influence of Emotion on the Risk Perception and Situation Awareness of Clinicians.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/26830.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lee, William. “The Influence of Emotion on the Risk Perception and Situation Awareness of Clinicians.” 2009. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Lee W. The Influence of Emotion on the Risk Perception and Situation Awareness of Clinicians. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2009. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/26830.

Council of Science Editors:

Lee W. The Influence of Emotion on the Risk Perception and Situation Awareness of Clinicians. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/26830


Virginia Tech

2. Staderman, William P. Communicating expertise in system operation and fault diagnosis to non-experts.

Degree: PhD, Industrial and Systems Engineering, 2003, Virginia Tech

The use of systems that span many knowledge domains is becoming more common as technology advances, requiring expert-performance in a domain from users who are usually not experts in that domain. This study examined a means of communicating expertise (in system operation and fault diagnosis) to non-experts and furthering the understanding of expert mental models. It has been suggested that conceptions of abstract models of system-functions distinguish expert performance from non-expert performance (Hanisch, Kramer, and Hulin, 1991). This study examined the effects on performance of augmenting a simple control panel device with a model of the functions of the device, interacting with the model, and augmenting the device with graphically superimposed procedural indicators (directions). The five augmented display conditions studied were: Device Only, Device + Model, Device + Procedural Indicators, Interactive Model, and Interactive Model + Procedural Indicators. The device and displays were presented on a PC workstation. Performance measures (speed and accuracy) and subjective measures (questionnaires, NASA TLX, and structured interviews) were collected. It was expected that participants who interact with the device + procedural indicators would exhibit the shortest performance time and least errors; however, those who interacted with the simplest display (device only) were fastest and exhibited the least errors. Results of this study are discussed in terms of building a mental model and identifying situations that require a mental model. Advisors/Committee Members: Kleiner, Brian M. (committeechair), Smith-Jackson, Tonya L. (committee member), Williges, Robert C. (committee member), North, Christopher L. (committee member), Hudlicka, Eva (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: mental models; device models; augmented reality

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Staderman, W. P. (2003). Communicating expertise in system operation and fault diagnosis to non-experts. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/27468

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Staderman, William P. “Communicating expertise in system operation and fault diagnosis to non-experts.” 2003. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/27468.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Staderman, William P. “Communicating expertise in system operation and fault diagnosis to non-experts.” 2003. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Staderman WP. Communicating expertise in system operation and fault diagnosis to non-experts. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2003. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/27468.

Council of Science Editors:

Staderman WP. Communicating expertise in system operation and fault diagnosis to non-experts. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2003. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/27468

.