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You searched for +publisher:"Virginia Tech" +contributor:("Arnold, Douglas Eugene"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Virginia Tech

1. Allen, Roger Scott. Cyberbullying in Middle Schools in Southwestern Virginia.

Degree: EdD, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, 2016, Virginia Tech

Cyberbullying is an alarming phenomenon affecting the lives of adolescents across the country. Traditional bullying has moved from the playground to cyberspace. This online environment allows perpetrators to attack their victims beyond the walls of school, twenty-four hours a day. Advancements in and access to technology have made electronic communication the preferred method for adolescents to socialize. Although email, texts, social media sites, and websites were created to ease communication, some adolescents are using these tools to harass and harm their peers. The purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the existence and prevalence of Cyberbullying in middle schools across Region VII in southwest Virginia. Cyberbullying policies and strategies used to address Cyberbullying were examined. The experiences of middle school principals with Cyberbullying incidents were explored. The aim of this study was to address the following three research questions: 1. What is the status of Cyberbullying in Region VII of southwest Virginia? 2. What are middle school principals' perspectives regarding their schools' effectiveness in responding to Cyberbullying? 3. What are middle school principals' recommendations to strengthen Cyberbullying policies and procedures? A quantitative method was chosen and a survey was conducted with the goal of adding to the literature that existed on Cyberbullying in public schools. Through the development and administration of a survey, quantitative data was collected. A quantitative analysis was conducted using descriptive statistics. The study adds to the current empirical research base on Cyberbullying in middle schools, especially in the rural area of a state. The perceptions of principals working in middle schools are valuable. This study tapped into this knowledge base and added to the literature on Cyberbullying by providing insights into the feelings and perceptions of administrators. Analyzing the experiences of the participants provided valuable information for those interested in learning more about Cyberbullying in middle schools in southwest Virginia. Findings of the study include information for Region VII of southwest Virginia on the status of Cyberbullying, middle-level schools' effectiveness in responding to Cyberbullying, and principals' recommendations to strengthen Cyberbullying policies and procedures. Based on the survey results, it is clear that Cyberbullying existed within the school systems in the region. Cyberbullying incidents occurred both at school and away from school. The largest percentage of these incidents occurred in the seventh and eighth-grades. Survey data indicated gender played a role in Cyberbullying with female students having the most reported incidents. Bullying prevention programs were being implemented in most school systems and schools in this region, and, in some cases, Cyberbullying was specifically addressed. In school systems and schools where no bullying or Cyberbullying prevention programs were… Advisors/Committee Members: Earthman, Glen I. (committeechair), Magliaro, Susan G. (committee member), Gratto, John Robert (committee member), Arnold, Douglas Eugene (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: bullying; Cyberbullying; school safety; principal perceptions

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Allen, R. S. (2016). Cyberbullying in Middle Schools in Southwestern Virginia. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/83420

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Allen, Roger Scott. “Cyberbullying in Middle Schools in Southwestern Virginia.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed April 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/83420.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Allen, Roger Scott. “Cyberbullying in Middle Schools in Southwestern Virginia.” 2016. Web. 18 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Allen RS. Cyberbullying in Middle Schools in Southwestern Virginia. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2016. [cited 2019 Apr 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/83420.

Council of Science Editors:

Allen RS. Cyberbullying in Middle Schools in Southwestern Virginia. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/83420

2. Mercer, Lisa Skaggs. Teacher and Administrator Perspectives on a Good Middle School: A Cross-Case Study.

Degree: EdD, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, 2015, Virginia Tech

Education for adolescents in middle-level schools is a topic of great interest for many educators. Reaching a consensus on what constitutes an effective education for middle-level learners has been a challenge. The purpose of this study was to contribute to this discussion. Although the study was designed to report on effective middle schools, the respondents reported their perspectives on good middle schools. The findings of this study about good middle schools may be beneficial to middle-level educators that are interested in improving educational environments and outcomes for the adolescent learner. A cross-case study methodology was used to investigate the perspectives on a good middle school of teachers and administrators in two middle schools in a school system in a southeastern state. Seventeen face-to-face interviews were conducted with a researcher-developed protocol, and document analyses were conducted. Data were analyzed with the constant comparative method. The perspectives of the participants were organized into ten categories of what they believed constitutes a good middle school: culture, personnel, the needs of diverse adolescent learners, organizational structures, transitions, instructional practices, parental involvement, curricular aspects, physical environment, and progress. The teacher and administrator perspectives on a good middle school were analyzed in three ways: (a) a descriptive analysis of the characteristics of a good middle school as viewed by the teachers and administrators of Dorchester Middle School and J. K. Walters Middle School; (b) a comparison of the characteristics of a good middle school as viewed by teachers and administrators of the two schools and the characteristics of a good middle school as identified by the National Association of Secondary School Principals Council on Middle Level Education in 1985, the Association for Middle Level Education in 2010, and the Carnegie Corporations Council on Adolescent Development in 1989; and (c) a comparison of the characteristics of a good middle school identified by the teachers and administrators of Dorchester Middle School and the characteristics of a good middle school identified by the teachers and administrators of J. K. Walters Middle School (pseudonyms). Middle school educators have struggled with the nature of an appropriate education for middle-level learners for decades. When combined with other studies of the perspectives on middle-level schooling of practicing teachers and administrators, those who work with middle-level learners every day, the data in this study may help in efforts to reach a consensus on the elements that should be a part of a good middle school. Advisors/Committee Members: Parks, David J. (committeechair), Arnold, Douglas Eugene (committee member), Gratto, John Robert (committee member), Magliaro, Susan G. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: junior high school; intermediate school; middle school; middle-level education; good middle school; grade configurations

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mercer, L. S. (2015). Teacher and Administrator Perspectives on a Good Middle School: A Cross-Case Study. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/64293

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mercer, Lisa Skaggs. “Teacher and Administrator Perspectives on a Good Middle School: A Cross-Case Study.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed April 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/64293.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mercer, Lisa Skaggs. “Teacher and Administrator Perspectives on a Good Middle School: A Cross-Case Study.” 2015. Web. 18 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Mercer LS. Teacher and Administrator Perspectives on a Good Middle School: A Cross-Case Study. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2015. [cited 2019 Apr 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/64293.

Council of Science Editors:

Mercer LS. Teacher and Administrator Perspectives on a Good Middle School: A Cross-Case Study. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/64293

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