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You searched for +publisher:"Virginia Tech" +contributor:("Anong, Sophia Tambudzai"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Stokes, Michelline. The Household Survival Strategies of Manufacturing Workers Displaced in Henry County and the New River Valley, 1990-2010.

Degree: PhD, School of Public and International Affairs, 2015, Virginia Tech

In this dissertation, I use interview data to answer three questions concerning the deindustrialization of southwest and southside Virginia. First, how have Radford City, Montgomery County, Pulaski County, the City of Martinsville and Henry County been affected by plant closures and mass layoffs at the community level? Second, how have displaced workers and their households been affected by this loss of manufacturing jobs? And third, what survival strategies have displaced workers and their households employed as a result of being displaced? In carrying out this research, I engage with four theoretical discussions: (1) deindustrialization of the US South, (2) the impact of deindustrialization on local communities and economies, (3) the impacts of deindustrialization on workers, and (4) workers' strategies for coping with job loss. I argue that the strategies employed are influenced, shaped, and/ or constrained by regional resources, family structure, and previous experience(s) with job loss due to plant closures and layoffs. The findings from this research suggest that household survival strategies are based on four influential or motivating factors: (1) the presence of a spouse and/or children in the home, (2) having prior experience with being displaced, (3) use of personal networks, and (4) utilization of spouses' knowledge, skills, and abilities. At the community level, there are two major findings. First, there is a level of resilience in the worst affected communities that keeps them moving forward, if at a slower pace than desired. Second, deindustrialization does not affect all manufacturing communities the same way. Local economic profiles, local resources, and past ties to manufacturing matter both in the severity of impacts and the options for rebounding and/ or creating new economic identities. For these reasons and others, it is suggested that future research continue to focus on individual communities and localities which are working to identify good long term solutions to address changes due to large scale economic disruption. Advisors/Committee Members: Datz, Giselle (committeechair), Wimberley, Dale W. (committeechair), Anong, Sophia Tambudzai (committee member), Luke, Timothy W. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Deindustrialization; job loss; survival strategies; household survival strategies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stokes, M. (2015). The Household Survival Strategies of Manufacturing Workers Displaced in Henry County and the New River Valley, 1990-2010. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/73871

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stokes, Michelline. “The Household Survival Strategies of Manufacturing Workers Displaced in Henry County and the New River Valley, 1990-2010.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed April 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/73871.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stokes, Michelline. “The Household Survival Strategies of Manufacturing Workers Displaced in Henry County and the New River Valley, 1990-2010.” 2015. Web. 22 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Stokes M. The Household Survival Strategies of Manufacturing Workers Displaced in Henry County and the New River Valley, 1990-2010. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2015. [cited 2019 Apr 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/73871.

Council of Science Editors:

Stokes M. The Household Survival Strategies of Manufacturing Workers Displaced in Henry County and the New River Valley, 1990-2010. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/73871


Virginia Tech

2. Hsu, Chungwen. Women\'s Retirement Income Satisfaction and Saving Behaviors.

Degree: PhD, Apparel, Housing, and Resource Management, 2013, Virginia Tech

Retirement saving research frequently has investigated the differences between working men and working women and primarily focused on the near retirement and retirement years. There is limited research targeting young to old working-age women including those who do not work for pay and are unemployed. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors affect non-retired working-age (25 years and older) women\'s retirement saving behaviors, retirement savings, and retirement income satisfaction. To implement the study, a research framework was developed based on Deacon and Firebaugh\'s Family Resource Management Model. The research framework for this study consisted of three major sections: (a) input (demographics, saving motives, retirement saving involvement level, retirement information seeking, current financial assets and debts, and future expectations), (b) throughput (retirement saving behaviors such as calculating needed retirement savings, being a retirement saver, starting saving for retirement age, and being a regular retirement saver), and (c) output (the objective retirement savings and the subjective retirement income satisfaction). An online survey instrument was developed to obtain data for the study. Two pilot tests were conducted to confirm the validity and reliability of the instrument. Data for this study were collected from a national population between May 25, 2012 and May 30, 2012 with 591 valid responses. Several statistical methods were employed: descriptive statistics, one-way between-groups analysis of variance (ANOVA), direct logistic regression, and standard multiple regression. From the results of the study, only about one-third of the women (31.8%) reported they expect to get the full amount of Social Security retirement income that today\'s retirees get. However, around 60% of the women only save less than 25,000 or none in employer-provided retirement accounts or in personal investments and savings. There is an un-addressed gap between the cognition of the need to save for retirement and real saving action. A regular retirement saver is more likely to save more in employer-provided retirement accounts and to feel more satisfied with that retirement income. Yet, regular retirement savers have less savings in personal investments and savings, possibly because they believe their work investments will be sufficient or some women may make direct deposits to meet the annual limits of retirement plans. Other researchers have not reported this relationship. Those women who are more cognitively involved with saving for retirement are more likely to calculate needed retirement savings and to be a retirement saver, but they are less satisfied with retirement income from Social Security and from personal investments and savings. Satisfaction level is subjective; thus, those who expect to own more types of assets in retirement may have a higher satisfaction level with the expected income from both employer-sponsored retirement accounts and personal… Advisors/Committee Members: Leech, Irene E. (committeechair), Fisher, Patricia J. (committee member), Beamish, Julia O. (committee member), Anong, Sophia Tambudzai (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Retirement Income Satisfaction; Retirement Savings; Retirement Saving Behavior; Involvement Level; Women

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hsu, C. (2013). Women\'s Retirement Income Satisfaction and Saving Behaviors. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/49586

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hsu, Chungwen. “Women\'s Retirement Income Satisfaction and Saving Behaviors.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed April 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/49586.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hsu, Chungwen. “Women\'s Retirement Income Satisfaction and Saving Behaviors.” 2013. Web. 22 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Hsu C. Women\'s Retirement Income Satisfaction and Saving Behaviors. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2013. [cited 2019 Apr 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/49586.

Council of Science Editors:

Hsu C. Women\'s Retirement Income Satisfaction and Saving Behaviors. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/49586

.