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You searched for +publisher:"Virginia Tech" +contributor:("Adams, Stephanie G."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Virginia Tech

1. Young, Glenda. Preparing Students for Professional Work Environments Through University- Industry Partnerships: A Single Case Study of the Co-op Development Program.

Degree: PhD, Engineering Education, 2017, Virginia Tech

Persistent calls to the field of engineering education to help develop diverse, well-prepared engineers for the STEM workforce have fostered collaborations across university and industry stakeholders. As stakeholders focus efforts on supporting student persistence at several critical junctures, there has been a renewed interest in supporting the school-to-workforce transition for engineering graduates. With calls to develop a more tech-savvy workforce, innovative approaches to supporting and preparing students to enter the workforce have become even more necessary; thus it is important to understand how university- industry partnerships generate experiences that contribute to students' eventual workforce entry. The structure of the Co-op Development Program and the perspective of eight former CDP participants addressed how learning experiences shaped the career decisions of engineering participants immediately following graduation. A qualitative single case study approach was used and Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) guided the study. Major contributions of this study include extending the analytic generalizability of Social Cognitive Career Theory, creating operationalized definitions of learning experiences embedded within that framework, and linking those experiences to how students' beliefs were shaped on their pathway to an early career within engineering industry. The themes identified in this study can help CDP managers and university stakeholders better support co-op participants and potentially allocate resources that will serve as the basis for future co-op design recommendations. Stakeholders may also use findings to promote the role of university and industry partnerships in supporting the student workforce transition. Future researchers may extend the study design across multiple cases and leverage recommendations for qualitative and quantitative investigations to address some of the limitations embedded within this research design and further contribute to the discussion of preparing students for professional work environments through university-industry partnerships. Ultimately, findings of this study give voice to the student partner in university-industry partnerships as themes identified in this study help CDP managers and university stakeholders to establish interventions and serve as the basis for future co-op design recommendations. Advisors/Committee Members: Knight, David B. (committeechair), Amelink, Catherine Theresa (committee member), Adams, Stephanie G. (committee member), Matusovich, Holly (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Cooperative Education; University Industry Partnerships; Engineering; Case Study; Social Cognitive Career Theory; Career Decision-Making

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Young, G. (2017). Preparing Students for Professional Work Environments Through University- Industry Partnerships: A Single Case Study of the Co-op Development Program. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/85414

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Young, Glenda. “Preparing Students for Professional Work Environments Through University- Industry Partnerships: A Single Case Study of the Co-op Development Program.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed June 26, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/85414.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Young, Glenda. “Preparing Students for Professional Work Environments Through University- Industry Partnerships: A Single Case Study of the Co-op Development Program.” 2017. Web. 26 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Young G. Preparing Students for Professional Work Environments Through University- Industry Partnerships: A Single Case Study of the Co-op Development Program. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2017. [cited 2019 Jun 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/85414.

Council of Science Editors:

Young G. Preparing Students for Professional Work Environments Through University- Industry Partnerships: A Single Case Study of the Co-op Development Program. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/85414


Virginia Tech

2. Cutler, Stephanie Leigh. How Static is the Statics Classroom? An investigation into how innovations, specifically Research-Based Instructional Strategies, are adopted into the Statics classroom.

Degree: PhD, Engineering Education, 2013, Virginia Tech

The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate how educational research, specifically Research-Based Instructional Strategies (RBIS), is adopted by education practice, specifically within the engineering Statics classroom. Using a systematic approach, changes in classroom teaching practices were investigated from the instructorsṕerspective. Both researchers and practitioners are included in the process, combining efforts to improve student learning, which is a critical goal for engineering education. The study is divided into 3 stages and each is discussed in an individual manuscript. Manuscript 1 provides an assessment of current teaching practices; Manuscript 2 explores RBIS use by Statics instructors and perceived barriers of adoption; and Manuscript 3 evaluates adoption using Fidelity of Implementation. A common set of concurrent mixed methods was used for each stage of this study. A quantitative national survey of Statics instructors (n =166) and 18 qualitative interviews were conducted to examine activities used in the Statics classroom and familiarity with nine RBIS. The results of this study show that lecturing is the most common activity throughout Statics classrooms, but is not the only activity. Other common activities included working examples and students working on problems individually and in groups. As discussed by the interview participants, each of Rogersćharacteristics influenced adoption for different reasons. For example, Complexity (level of difficulty with implementation of an RBIS) was most commonly identified as a barrier. His study also evaluated the Fidelity of Implementation for each RBIS and found it to be higher for RBIS that were less complex (in terms of the number of critical components). Many of the critical components (i.e. activities required for implementation, as described in the literature) were found to statistically distinguish RBIS users and non-users. This dissertation offers four contributions: (1) an understanding of current ractices in Statics; (2) the instructor perspective of the barriers to using RBIS in the classroom; (3) the use of Fidelity of Implementation as a unique evaluation of RBIS adoption, which can be used by future engineering education researchers; and (4) a systematic approach of exploring change in the classroom, which offers new perspectives and approaches to accelerate the adoption process. Advisors/Committee Members: Borrego, Maura Jenkins (committeechair), McNair, Elizabeth D. (committee member), Adams, Stephanie G. (committee member), Kleiner, Brian M. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Research-Based Instructional Strategies; Diffusion of Innovation; Fidelity of Implementation; Statics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cutler, S. L. (2013). How Static is the Statics Classroom? An investigation into how innovations, specifically Research-Based Instructional Strategies, are adopted into the Statics classroom. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/20376

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cutler, Stephanie Leigh. “How Static is the Statics Classroom? An investigation into how innovations, specifically Research-Based Instructional Strategies, are adopted into the Statics classroom.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed June 26, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/20376.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cutler, Stephanie Leigh. “How Static is the Statics Classroom? An investigation into how innovations, specifically Research-Based Instructional Strategies, are adopted into the Statics classroom.” 2013. Web. 26 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Cutler SL. How Static is the Statics Classroom? An investigation into how innovations, specifically Research-Based Instructional Strategies, are adopted into the Statics classroom. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2013. [cited 2019 Jun 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/20376.

Council of Science Editors:

Cutler SL. How Static is the Statics Classroom? An investigation into how innovations, specifically Research-Based Instructional Strategies, are adopted into the Statics classroom. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/20376


Virginia Tech

3. Smith, Courtney Shaleah. The Intersecting Perspective: African American Female Experiences with Faculty Mentoring in Undergraduate Engineering.

Degree: PhD, Engineering Education, 2015, Virginia Tech

The value of diversity in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) fields has long been a leading topic of discussion among campus administrators and government officials. However, the number of African American women in STEM, and the engineering field in particular, has seen little growth over the past twenty years. To change this trend, there must be enhanced efforts to provide an environment and resources to support the retention of these women, and mentoring can play a key role. To gain a better understanding of the mentoring needs of these women, this research investigates the mentoring experiences of 16 current senior African American female engineering students. What is clear is that African American women have a unique set of experiences based on the multiple sets of identity groups that they claim membership in. Intersectionality emphasizes the implications of the multiplication of these identities and how that multiplication impacts experiences. This research, addresses the intersection by exploring faculty mentoring relationships, with particular focus on the implications of having a matched (same race and gender) or an unmatched mentor. Current research is inconsistent on the benefits of each type. Using phenomenography, this investigation of the various aspects of mentoring relationships that are salient to 16 African American women in engineering uncovered seven categories of mentoring: Guide, Proactive Supporter, Reactive Listener, Nurturer, Just in Time, Caring, and Role Model. Variation across these mentoring categories were reflected in the mentoring aspects that participants perceived. This set of interpersonal (listen, invested, and shared experience) and professional (development, opportunity, advice, and example) aspects depicted a set of mentoring types that varied in comprehensiveness. Additionally, variation in the race and gender of each mentor across each category suggested some trends surrounding the mentor characteristics that most frequently provided certain aspects. However, all of the categories that emerged were perceived to be effective. It is desired that the results of this research will impact the ways in which faculty understand the needs of African American women in engineering. Advisors/Committee Members: Paretti, Marie C. (committeechair), Matusovich, Holly (committee member), Adams, Stephanie G. (committee member), Bondy, Jennifer M. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Mentoring; African American Female Students; Engineering Education; Phenomenography; Intersectionality

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, C. S. (2015). The Intersecting Perspective: African American Female Experiences with Faculty Mentoring in Undergraduate Engineering. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/56490

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Courtney Shaleah. “The Intersecting Perspective: African American Female Experiences with Faculty Mentoring in Undergraduate Engineering.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed June 26, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/56490.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Courtney Shaleah. “The Intersecting Perspective: African American Female Experiences with Faculty Mentoring in Undergraduate Engineering.” 2015. Web. 26 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Smith CS. The Intersecting Perspective: African American Female Experiences with Faculty Mentoring in Undergraduate Engineering. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2015. [cited 2019 Jun 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/56490.

Council of Science Editors:

Smith CS. The Intersecting Perspective: African American Female Experiences with Faculty Mentoring in Undergraduate Engineering. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/56490

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