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You searched for +publisher:"Virginia Tech" +contributor:("Abel, Ann T."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Virginia Tech

1. Cox, Paul Andrew. Comparison of Selected Benchmark Testing Methodologies as Predictors of Virginia Standards of Learning Test Scores.

Degree: EdD, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, 2011, Virginia Tech

This study examined how Math-Curriculum Based Measurement (M-CBM) benchmark assessment scores predict fifth grade math Standards of Learning (SOL) assessment scores.  Three school districts participated in the study by providing student data on math benchmark assessments and fifth grade math SOL assessment scores. Scores were organized and analyzed to determine the level of prediction between the two data sets. The results of the study indicated that M-CBM benchmark assessments were good predictors of fifth grade math SOL assessment scores. A second purpose of the study was to measure the differences in the capacity of three different M-CBM benchmark assessments in predicting fifth grade math SOL assessment scores. The three school districts used M-CBM benchmark assessments that varied in the method of creation and the type (commercial, teacher created, released test item) to develop the assessments. The findings show the M-CBM benchmark assessments created by teachers were better predictors of student scores on the fifth grade math SOL assessment followed by released test items and the commercially developed assessments. The third goal of the research study was to determine if there were differences in costs associated with three different M-CBM benchmark assessments. The reported costs for each of the three assessment types were analyzed but the gross cost per student did not accurately reflect the total costs involved in creating, operating, and/or maintaining the M-CBM benchmark assessment systems in any of the three districts. A literature review identified contributions in the field in the areas of assessment, Curriculum Based Measurement (CBM), and predicting student performance. The research design was quantitative and the school district data collected was over the 2009-2010 school year.  Recommendation for future research was to focus on the implementation methods and utilization of M-CBM benchmark assessments by teachers to modify instruction. Possible research on how the benchmark data can be utilized or converted into a practical classroom predictor of SOL assessment outcomes was recommended also. Advisors/Committee Members: Craig, James Richard (committeechair), Magliaro, Susan G. (committee member), Abel, Ann T. (committee member), Tripp, Norman Wayne (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Predictors; Student Achievement; Keywords: Benchmark Assessments; Curriculum Based Measures; Virginia Standards of Learning

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cox, P. A. (2011). Comparison of Selected Benchmark Testing Methodologies as Predictors of Virginia Standards of Learning Test Scores. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29586

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cox, Paul Andrew. “Comparison of Selected Benchmark Testing Methodologies as Predictors of Virginia Standards of Learning Test Scores.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed May 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29586.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cox, Paul Andrew. “Comparison of Selected Benchmark Testing Methodologies as Predictors of Virginia Standards of Learning Test Scores.” 2011. Web. 24 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Cox PA. Comparison of Selected Benchmark Testing Methodologies as Predictors of Virginia Standards of Learning Test Scores. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2011. [cited 2019 May 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29586.

Council of Science Editors:

Cox PA. Comparison of Selected Benchmark Testing Methodologies as Predictors of Virginia Standards of Learning Test Scores. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/29586


Virginia Tech

2. Bezy, Kevin Gerard. An Operational Definition of Spiritual Leadership.

Degree: PhD, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, 2011, Virginia Tech

This is the report of a Delphi study designed to identify the characteristics, behaviors, and work environments of spiritual leaders. A panel of philosophers, writers, business leaders, non-profit leaders, religious leaders, educators, and politicians was purposefully recruited to participate in the study. Data gathered from the panel were analyzed with the Maykut and Morehouse (1994) constant comparative method and descriptive statistics to identify characteristics, behaviors, and work environments of spiritual leaders. The panel-identified characteristics and behaviors of spiritual leaders were grouped into three themes: interpersonal, intrapersonal, and religious. Work environments in which spiritual leaders can be effective were grouped into six themes: community-building, person-centered, product-oriented, principle-driven, religious, and mission/purpose-driven. The interpersonal descriptors are predominant in the findings, supporting the conclusion that spiritual leadership is interpersonal in nature in an enhanced way. Although writers have emphasized that spiritual leadership is separable from religion, the panelists accepted 13 descriptors in religious categories, indicating that they had difficulty separating spiritual religious leadership from a secular counterpart. The findings incorporate the concepts of meaning, community, and integrity presented in a theory of spiritual leadership created for this study, but the findings go well beyond the concepts in the theory. To be more reflective of reality, the theory must be expanded to emphasize the other-orientation of spiritual leaders. The expanded theory and the enriched concepts within it may have benefit to practitioners and future researchers interested in exploring the practice and study of spiritual leadership. Two tools were created from the findings. One tool is a self-assessment that leaders may use to compare their leadership style with that of spiritual leaders. The second tool may be used by leaders to assess whether their work environments promote the effectiveness of spiritual leaders. Researchers may find the tools useful as initial measures of the characteristics, behaviors, and environments of spiritual leaders. Advisors/Committee Members: Parks, David J. (committeechair), Craig, James Richard (committee member), Creighton, Theodore B. (committee member), Abel, Ann T. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Education; Workplace; Spirituality; Integrity; Spiritual Leadership; Schools; Delphi

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bezy, K. G. (2011). An Operational Definition of Spiritual Leadership. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/26865

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bezy, Kevin Gerard. “An Operational Definition of Spiritual Leadership.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed May 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/26865.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bezy, Kevin Gerard. “An Operational Definition of Spiritual Leadership.” 2011. Web. 24 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Bezy KG. An Operational Definition of Spiritual Leadership. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2011. [cited 2019 May 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/26865.

Council of Science Editors:

Bezy KG. An Operational Definition of Spiritual Leadership. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/26865


Virginia Tech

3. Mirra, David R. The Role of the School Superintendent as a Technology Leader: A Delphi Study.

Degree: EdD, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, 2004, Virginia Tech

School superintendents have been thrust into the complex world of technology leadership often armed with little technology related training or expertise. District and school leaders are often faced with purchase decisions of costly equipment and software with minimum knowledge of what impact it will have on their organization or specific knowledge of how it will be used to meet curriculum goals. With continued local, state, and federal support and rapid advances in technology, school superintendents are expected to provide leadership in this fast-changing arena. The purpose of this study was to define the role of the school superintendent as an effective technology leader in terms of knowledge, performances, and dispositions. The research questions guiding this study were: - What does a superintendent need to know about technology to be an effective technology leader? - What actions should be performed by a superintendent to be an effective technology leader? - What are indicators of a superintendent's disposition as an effective technology leader? The study was conducted using a three-round Delphi with an expert panel composed of 29 stakeholders with diverse perspectives in the area of school technology leadership. The findings in this study showed a group consensus on 27 knowledge items, 27 performance actions, and 35 dispositional indicators of school superintendents as effective technology leaders. The study contains criteria that may be useful in the development of technology related preparation practices for school superintendents. The findings may also be of interest to those concerned with professional development for superintendents or to those involved in the selection of superintendents for technology leadership positions. Advisors/Committee Members: Parson, Stephen R. (committeechair), Byers, Larry (committee member), Twiford, Travis W. (committee member), Wenrich, John (committee member), Abel, Ann T. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Superintendent; Technology; Dispositions; Knowledge; Performances; Delphi; Leadership

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mirra, D. R. (2004). The Role of the School Superintendent as a Technology Leader: A Delphi Study. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Tech. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10919/11170

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mirra, David R. “The Role of the School Superintendent as a Technology Leader: A Delphi Study.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Tech. Accessed May 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10919/11170.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mirra, David R. “The Role of the School Superintendent as a Technology Leader: A Delphi Study.” 2004. Web. 24 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Mirra DR. The Role of the School Superintendent as a Technology Leader: A Delphi Study. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2004. [cited 2019 May 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/11170.

Council of Science Editors:

Mirra DR. The Role of the School Superintendent as a Technology Leader: A Delphi Study. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Tech; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10919/11170

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