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You searched for +publisher:"Virginia Commonwealth University" +contributor:("Paul Bukaveckas"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Virginia Commonwealth University

1. Ryan, John-Reid. Assessing the feasibility of freshwater mussel restoration in urban streams.

Degree: MS, Environmental Studies, 2020, Virginia Commonwealth University

Abstract The main objective of this study was to determine whether introduced freshwater mussels (Alewife floater, Utterbackiana implicata) can survive and grow in urban streams in the James River watershed. A secondary objective was to assess differences in U. implicata survival and growth of in the context of differing water quality and food resource conditions among three urban sites and three rural sites. Results from this study show large differences in growth and survivorship of mussels across sites. Higher survivorship was observed among mussels stocked into rural streams (35% and 44%) in comparison to urban streams (3%, 6% and 14%). High mortality in urban streams was largely due to washout and burial of mussels. These findings suggest that the “flashy” hydrology typically associated with urban streams is a significant impediment to successful introduction at these sites. High growth rates were observed in one of the rural streams (Herring Creek: 57 mg/d), whereas growth rates were less than 15 mg/d at all other sites. Food resource metrics showed statistically significant differences among sites with higher values of TSS, particle density, organic matter content and chlorophyll-a content at rural sites relative to urban sites. These findings suggest that rural sites had more favorable food resources than rural streams, though we did not find that food metrics were a significant predictor of variation in growth rates among sites. We did not find that water quality metrics (temperature, dissolved oxygen) were a significant predictor of variation in mussel growth rates. Overall, these findings suggest that hydrologic conditions in urban streams pose a significant challenge to the successful reintroduction on native mussels. Advisors/Committee Members: Paul Bukaveckas, Rachel Mair, Joseph Wood, James Vonesh.

Subjects/Keywords: Freshwater Mussel; Stream Restoration; Water Quality; Urban Streams; Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ryan, J. (2020). Assessing the feasibility of freshwater mussel restoration in urban streams. (Thesis). Virginia Commonwealth University. Retrieved from https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/6405

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ryan, John-Reid. “Assessing the feasibility of freshwater mussel restoration in urban streams.” 2020. Thesis, Virginia Commonwealth University. Accessed January 19, 2021. https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/6405.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ryan, John-Reid. “Assessing the feasibility of freshwater mussel restoration in urban streams.” 2020. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Ryan J. Assessing the feasibility of freshwater mussel restoration in urban streams. [Internet] [Thesis]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2020. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/6405.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ryan J. Assessing the feasibility of freshwater mussel restoration in urban streams. [Thesis]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2020. Available from: https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/6405

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Virginia Commonwealth University

2. Faunce, Kaycee. Regional drivers of organic carbon age in lotic systems of the conterminous United States.

Degree: MS, Environmental Studies, 2020, Virginia Commonwealth University

Rivers play a critical role in global carbon (C) budgets despite their comparatively small surface area. A significant portion of the terrestrial C that they receive is transformed, re-mineralized, or stored during transit to the ocean. Radiocarbon (∆14C) data show that a fraction of riverine organic C (OC) has been pre-aged in the terrestrial environment. Lateral export of carbon from these aged pools may contribute to atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions through microbial and photochemical oxidation. However, little is known about the regional climatic, anthropogenic, and landscape factors that promote the mobilization of aged OC to rivers. This study examines associations between riverine OC and river basin characteristics. It leverages data from two sources: 1) a spatially extensive collection of literature-reported ∆14C measurements and 2) the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Stream-Catchment (StreamCat) database. The radiocarbon data include 95 dissolved (∆14CDOC) and 54 particulate (∆14CPOC) organic C measurements after averaging by location. We used the random forest (RF) machine learning algorithm to build independent models of ∆14CDOC (MSR = 7319.51, % var explained = 17.05) and ∆14CPOC (MSR = 11254.03, % var explained = 45.36). In both RF models, the StreamCat data were used aspredictor variables. Model validation was accomplished with a random, 75:25 split where 75% of the data were used for model building and the remaining 25% were used for testing and validation (∆14CDOC RMSE = 61.23, r = 0.71; ∆14CPOC RMSE = 39.82, r = 0.94). Key predictors of ∆14CDOC were generally climactic or land cover variables affecting terrestrial primary productivity. Key predictors of ∆14CPOC were primarily factors associated with sediment transport and erosion, but also included several indicators of anthropogenic influence. Human activities appear to be destabilizing both C pools, resulting in aged C flux to the more rapidly cycled C reservoir in rivers. Advisors/Committee Members: Daniel J. McGarvey, S. Leigh McCallister, Paul Bukaveckas.

Subjects/Keywords: carbon; biogeochemistry; radiocarbon; aquatic biogeochemistry; carbon cycling; Environmental Sciences; Other Environmental Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Faunce, K. (2020). Regional drivers of organic carbon age in lotic systems of the conterminous United States. (Thesis). Virginia Commonwealth University. Retrieved from https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/6435

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Faunce, Kaycee. “Regional drivers of organic carbon age in lotic systems of the conterminous United States.” 2020. Thesis, Virginia Commonwealth University. Accessed January 19, 2021. https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/6435.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Faunce, Kaycee. “Regional drivers of organic carbon age in lotic systems of the conterminous United States.” 2020. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Faunce K. Regional drivers of organic carbon age in lotic systems of the conterminous United States. [Internet] [Thesis]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2020. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/6435.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Faunce K. Regional drivers of organic carbon age in lotic systems of the conterminous United States. [Thesis]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2020. Available from: https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/6435

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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