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You searched for +publisher:"Virginia Commonwealth University" +contributor:("Dr. Rowena Briones"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Virginia Commonwealth University

1. Parrish, Candace P. EXPLORING VISUAL PREVENTION: DEVELOPING INFOGRAPHICS AS EFFECTIVE CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN.

Degree: PhD, Media, Art, and Text, 2016, Virginia Commonwealth University

The purpose of this dissertation is to explore the creation of a cervical cancer health prevention infographic, geared toward African American women ages 30 to 65, to be potentially used to raise health literacy and influence positive behaviors towards practicing prevention measures—ultimately preventing unnecessary deaths. This dissertation also produced a cervical cancer health prevention infographic prototype for African American Women ages 30 to 65 to be further tested and implemented within future health communication campaigns. Cervical Cancer is both preventable and treatable (if diagnosed during early stages); therefore the amount of individuals dying from the cancer should be minimal. Still, African American Women in this study’s target health population are dying from Cervical Cancer the most. Existing research highlights that social determinants of health (like income, education and literacy) play varying roles as barriers to prevention (Baldwin, 1996; J. L. Davis et al., 2013; Egbert & Parrott, 2001; Ford et al., 2013; McKinnon, Harper, & Moore, 2011; Sung, Alema-Mensah, & Blumenthal, 2002; Williams & Templin, 2013). . This dissertation specifically focuses on targeting the potential to increase health literacy on Cervical Cancer to potentially positively influence prevention uptake. Drawing upon fields like health communication, visual communication and social science research, this research endeavor presents an interdisciplinary approach to potentially solving health communication issue within an at-risk population. The theoretical framework in guiding infographic production for this dissertation was the Health Belief Model, which is widely used in health communication research to assess failure of prevention uptake (du Pré, 2014; Glanz et al., 2005; Maibach & Parrott, 1995; Rosenstock, 2000). The Health Belief Model in conjunction with existing literature regarding health literacy, cultural stigma and relevance in communication campaigns geared toward African American Women ages 30 to 65, infographic content was created and presented to study participants via six interactive focus groups. The focus group methodology of qualitative research allowed for 17 study participants to confidentially engage in dialogue with peers concerning the issue at hand while also helping to create the content hierarchy, enhance and suggest visuals, colors and themes of the proposed infographic. Iterative data analysis approaches allow for constant assessment of study outcomes and themes. This study produces theoretical, practical and methodological implications for future research on the lacking area of scholarly literature. Findings from this dissertation suggest a need to (1) test the proposed infographic for potential national health campaign usage, (2) a need for more long-term collaborative community efforts for continual population access in research on Cervical Cancer prevention, and (3) future assessment of a newer form of focus group research that focuses on incorporation… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Rowena Briones, Dr. Candace Johnson, Dr. Marcus Messner, Dr. Ryan Patton.

Subjects/Keywords: Health Communication; Cervical Cancer; Infographics; Visual Communication African American Women; Information Graphics; Cervical Cancer Prevention; Focus Groups; Graphic Communications; Health Communication

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Parrish, C. P. (2016). EXPLORING VISUAL PREVENTION: DEVELOPING INFOGRAPHICS AS EFFECTIVE CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Commonwealth University. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.25772/BZEK-K407 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4455

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Parrish, Candace P. “EXPLORING VISUAL PREVENTION: DEVELOPING INFOGRAPHICS AS EFFECTIVE CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Commonwealth University. Accessed December 02, 2020. https://doi.org/10.25772/BZEK-K407 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4455.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Parrish, Candace P. “EXPLORING VISUAL PREVENTION: DEVELOPING INFOGRAPHICS AS EFFECTIVE CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN.” 2016. Web. 02 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Parrish CP. EXPLORING VISUAL PREVENTION: DEVELOPING INFOGRAPHICS AS EFFECTIVE CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2016. [cited 2020 Dec 02]. Available from: https://doi.org/10.25772/BZEK-K407 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4455.

Council of Science Editors:

Parrish CP. EXPLORING VISUAL PREVENTION: DEVELOPING INFOGRAPHICS AS EFFECTIVE CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2016. Available from: https://doi.org/10.25772/BZEK-K407 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4455


Virginia Commonwealth University

2. Hall, Katherine. "THEY BELIEVE THAT BECAUSE THEY ARE WOMEN, IT SHOULD BE EASIER FOR THEM." SUBTLE AND OVERT SEXISM TOWARD WOMEN IN STEM FROM SOCIAL MEDIA COMMENTARY.

Degree: PhD, Public Policy & Administration, 2016, Virginia Commonwealth University

This study implemented a social media based content analysis to examine the subjective experiences and the current public perceptions of sexism in STEM fields. Participants included men and women who a) identified as either in STEM or not identified as in STEM and b) commented through Facebook on HuffPost Women articles about women in STEM. The analysis indicated that sexism remains an issue for women in STEM careers. Women in STEM identified several gender-based challenges that they have experienced; some participants discussed how they handled those challenges. Men both in and not in STEM were less likely to acknowledge and more likely to deny that sexism was a problem for women in STEM than were women participants. Though findings showed a high rate of supportive commentary from women, they also showed a substantial number of male commenters displaying overt sexism. The analysis helped identify a new form of sexism to the literature on subtle sexism: Threat to Masculinity. More specifically, both men and women were found to display overt sexism to men who supported women by utilizing gender based stereotypes to validate their claims and police gender roles. Findings from this study support the literature suggesting that sexism remains an issue that needs to be addressed; the analysis begins to build a theory about how such sexism is portrayed through social media commentary as an important arena of social and cultural debate. Current policies aimed at ending sexism/discrimination should be expanded to support and encourage women’s participation in STEM careers. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Sarah Jane Brubaker, Dr. John Mahoney, Dr. Natalie Baker, Dr. Rowena Briones.

Subjects/Keywords: women; STEM; social media; sexism; facebook; policy; organization; Public Policy; Social Policy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hall, K. (2016). "THEY BELIEVE THAT BECAUSE THEY ARE WOMEN, IT SHOULD BE EASIER FOR THEM." SUBTLE AND OVERT SEXISM TOWARD WOMEN IN STEM FROM SOCIAL MEDIA COMMENTARY. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Commonwealth University. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.25772/MR3F-0E95 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4160

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hall, Katherine. “"THEY BELIEVE THAT BECAUSE THEY ARE WOMEN, IT SHOULD BE EASIER FOR THEM." SUBTLE AND OVERT SEXISM TOWARD WOMEN IN STEM FROM SOCIAL MEDIA COMMENTARY.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Commonwealth University. Accessed December 02, 2020. https://doi.org/10.25772/MR3F-0E95 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4160.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hall, Katherine. “"THEY BELIEVE THAT BECAUSE THEY ARE WOMEN, IT SHOULD BE EASIER FOR THEM." SUBTLE AND OVERT SEXISM TOWARD WOMEN IN STEM FROM SOCIAL MEDIA COMMENTARY.” 2016. Web. 02 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Hall K. "THEY BELIEVE THAT BECAUSE THEY ARE WOMEN, IT SHOULD BE EASIER FOR THEM." SUBTLE AND OVERT SEXISM TOWARD WOMEN IN STEM FROM SOCIAL MEDIA COMMENTARY. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2016. [cited 2020 Dec 02]. Available from: https://doi.org/10.25772/MR3F-0E95 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4160.

Council of Science Editors:

Hall K. "THEY BELIEVE THAT BECAUSE THEY ARE WOMEN, IT SHOULD BE EASIER FOR THEM." SUBTLE AND OVERT SEXISM TOWARD WOMEN IN STEM FROM SOCIAL MEDIA COMMENTARY. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2016. Available from: https://doi.org/10.25772/MR3F-0E95 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4160

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