Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Virginia Commonwealth University" +contributor:("Dr. Marcus Messner"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Virginia Commonwealth University

1. Parrish, Candace P. EXPLORING VISUAL PREVENTION: DEVELOPING INFOGRAPHICS AS EFFECTIVE CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN.

Degree: PhD, Media, Art, and Text, 2016, Virginia Commonwealth University

The purpose of this dissertation is to explore the creation of a cervical cancer health prevention infographic, geared toward African American women ages 30 to 65, to be potentially used to raise health literacy and influence positive behaviors towards practicing prevention measures—ultimately preventing unnecessary deaths. This dissertation also produced a cervical cancer health prevention infographic prototype for African American Women ages 30 to 65 to be further tested and implemented within future health communication campaigns. Cervical Cancer is both preventable and treatable (if diagnosed during early stages); therefore the amount of individuals dying from the cancer should be minimal. Still, African American Women in this study’s target health population are dying from Cervical Cancer the most. Existing research highlights that social determinants of health (like income, education and literacy) play varying roles as barriers to prevention (Baldwin, 1996; J. L. Davis et al., 2013; Egbert & Parrott, 2001; Ford et al., 2013; McKinnon, Harper, & Moore, 2011; Sung, Alema-Mensah, & Blumenthal, 2002; Williams & Templin, 2013). . This dissertation specifically focuses on targeting the potential to increase health literacy on Cervical Cancer to potentially positively influence prevention uptake. Drawing upon fields like health communication, visual communication and social science research, this research endeavor presents an interdisciplinary approach to potentially solving health communication issue within an at-risk population. The theoretical framework in guiding infographic production for this dissertation was the Health Belief Model, which is widely used in health communication research to assess failure of prevention uptake (du Pré, 2014; Glanz et al., 2005; Maibach & Parrott, 1995; Rosenstock, 2000). The Health Belief Model in conjunction with existing literature regarding health literacy, cultural stigma and relevance in communication campaigns geared toward African American Women ages 30 to 65, infographic content was created and presented to study participants via six interactive focus groups. The focus group methodology of qualitative research allowed for 17 study participants to confidentially engage in dialogue with peers concerning the issue at hand while also helping to create the content hierarchy, enhance and suggest visuals, colors and themes of the proposed infographic. Iterative data analysis approaches allow for constant assessment of study outcomes and themes. This study produces theoretical, practical and methodological implications for future research on the lacking area of scholarly literature. Findings from this dissertation suggest a need to (1) test the proposed infographic for potential national health campaign usage, (2) a need for more long-term collaborative community efforts for continual population access in research on Cervical Cancer prevention, and (3) future assessment of a newer form of focus group research that focuses on incorporation… Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Rowena Briones, Dr. Candace Johnson, Dr. Marcus Messner, Dr. Ryan Patton.

Subjects/Keywords: Health Communication; Cervical Cancer; Infographics; Visual Communication African American Women; Information Graphics; Cervical Cancer Prevention; Focus Groups; Graphic Communications; Health Communication

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Parrish, C. P. (2016). EXPLORING VISUAL PREVENTION: DEVELOPING INFOGRAPHICS AS EFFECTIVE CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Commonwealth University. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.25772/BZEK-K407 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4455

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Parrish, Candace P. “EXPLORING VISUAL PREVENTION: DEVELOPING INFOGRAPHICS AS EFFECTIVE CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Commonwealth University. Accessed November 25, 2020. https://doi.org/10.25772/BZEK-K407 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4455.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Parrish, Candace P. “EXPLORING VISUAL PREVENTION: DEVELOPING INFOGRAPHICS AS EFFECTIVE CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN.” 2016. Web. 25 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Parrish CP. EXPLORING VISUAL PREVENTION: DEVELOPING INFOGRAPHICS AS EFFECTIVE CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 25]. Available from: https://doi.org/10.25772/BZEK-K407 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4455.

Council of Science Editors:

Parrish CP. EXPLORING VISUAL PREVENTION: DEVELOPING INFOGRAPHICS AS EFFECTIVE CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2016. Available from: https://doi.org/10.25772/BZEK-K407 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4455


Virginia Commonwealth University

2. Stewart, Sean M. Visualization, Viewer and Emotion: An Empirical Study of Cognition and Affective Responses to Infographics Used for Crisis Communication.

Degree: PhD, Media, Art, and Text, 2014, Virginia Commonwealth University

A 3 (crisis response strategy) x 3 (medium) factorial design experiment was conducted to determine if information graphics conveyed through online news sources may be more beneficial for organizational reputations during some crisis situations than the use of news videos and text-based news stories. Variables examined include cognitive and affective appraisal, third-person effect, behavioral response and crisis response strategy. Recent research in organizational crisis communications has pointed to the fact that more information is needed regarding how individuals react cognitively and affectively to crisis communications. Current crisis communications literature is also sparse concerning the behavioral aspects of crisis message reception and social media usage. This study addressed these concerns and built on the established framework of Situational Crisis Communication Theory (SCCT). Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Ernest Martin, Dr. Eric Garberson, Dr. Yan Jin, Dr. Marcus Messner, Dr. Yuan Zhang.

Subjects/Keywords: Crisis Communication; Infographics; Information Graphics; Cognition; Affect; Third-Person Effect; eWOM; SCCT; Coombs; Tufte; Graphic Communications; Mass Communication; Public Relations and Advertising; Social Media

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stewart, S. M. (2014). Visualization, Viewer and Emotion: An Empirical Study of Cognition and Affective Responses to Infographics Used for Crisis Communication. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Commonwealth University. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.25772/M681-3S17 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/3640

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stewart, Sean M. “Visualization, Viewer and Emotion: An Empirical Study of Cognition and Affective Responses to Infographics Used for Crisis Communication.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Commonwealth University. Accessed November 25, 2020. https://doi.org/10.25772/M681-3S17 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/3640.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stewart, Sean M. “Visualization, Viewer and Emotion: An Empirical Study of Cognition and Affective Responses to Infographics Used for Crisis Communication.” 2014. Web. 25 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Stewart SM. Visualization, Viewer and Emotion: An Empirical Study of Cognition and Affective Responses to Infographics Used for Crisis Communication. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2014. [cited 2020 Nov 25]. Available from: https://doi.org/10.25772/M681-3S17 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/3640.

Council of Science Editors:

Stewart SM. Visualization, Viewer and Emotion: An Empirical Study of Cognition and Affective Responses to Infographics Used for Crisis Communication. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2014. Available from: https://doi.org/10.25772/M681-3S17 ; https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/3640

.