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You searched for +publisher:"Virginia Commonwealth University" +contributor:("Al Copolillo"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Virginia Commonwealth University

1. McNeil, Jane. WORKPLACE DISCRIMINATION AND VISUAL IMPAIRMENT: AN ANALYSIS OF EEOC CHARGES AND RESOLUTIONS.

Degree: PhD, Health Related Sciences, 2015, Virginia Commonwealth University

Workplace discrimination for individuals with visual impairments in the U.S. is an ongoing issue dating before the founding of the EEOC and the enactment of the ADA. Despite laws enacted to protect against unequal treatment in the workplace, the EEOC continues to receive submissions of formal discrimination charges from individuals with visual impairments. The workplace is experiencing changes with increasing amounts of older adults, women, minorities, and the use of technology and the Internet. By examining characteristics of the discrimination charges and the resulting outcomes, the knowledge gained can describe the current situation and the historical progression of workplace discrimination for individuals with visual impairments. The purpose of this cross-sectional study is to understand through descriptive, non-parametric, and logistical regression analyses of secondary data, meaningful associations regarding workplace discrimination and Americans with visual impairments. Study results showed that charging party characteristics of age, gender, and race were found to be predictive of types of discrimination charges and resolutions outcomes. Respondent characteristics of employer region of location, size, and industry were also found to be predictive of types of discrimination charges and resolution outcomes. Differences were revealed between discrimination charges before and after the enactment of the ADAAA, yet not between resolution outcomes before and after the enactment of the ADAAA. Additionally, discrimination charges and resolution outcomes were determined to be associated with one another. Implications for employees, employers, and professionals who work with individuals with visual impairments are addressed and recommendations for further research are provided. Advisors/Committee Members: Al Copolillo.

Subjects/Keywords: Model of Human Occupation; Americans with Disabilities Act; Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act; Occupational Therapy; Equal Employment Opportunity Commission; Job Acquisition; Job Retention; Job Satisfaction; Occupational Therapy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McNeil, J. (2015). WORKPLACE DISCRIMINATION AND VISUAL IMPAIRMENT: AN ANALYSIS OF EEOC CHARGES AND RESOLUTIONS. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Commonwealth University. Retrieved from https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4081

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McNeil, Jane. “WORKPLACE DISCRIMINATION AND VISUAL IMPAIRMENT: AN ANALYSIS OF EEOC CHARGES AND RESOLUTIONS.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Commonwealth University. Accessed November 18, 2019. https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4081.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McNeil, Jane. “WORKPLACE DISCRIMINATION AND VISUAL IMPAIRMENT: AN ANALYSIS OF EEOC CHARGES AND RESOLUTIONS.” 2015. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

McNeil J. WORKPLACE DISCRIMINATION AND VISUAL IMPAIRMENT: AN ANALYSIS OF EEOC CHARGES AND RESOLUTIONS. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4081.

Council of Science Editors:

McNeil J. WORKPLACE DISCRIMINATION AND VISUAL IMPAIRMENT: AN ANALYSIS OF EEOC CHARGES AND RESOLUTIONS. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2015. Available from: https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/4081


Virginia Commonwealth University

2. Fix, Robert. THE COGNITIVE AND FUNCTIONAL IMPACT OF OPEN HEART SURGERY: A PILOT STUDY INCLUDING THREE COMMON PROCEDURES (CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS GRAFT, HEART VALVE REPLACEMENT, AND LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE).

Degree: PhD, Health Related Sciences, 2018, Virginia Commonwealth University

This study investigated the impact of open heart surgery (Coronary Artery Bypass Graft, Heart Valve Replacement, or Left Ventricular Assist Device placement) on cognition, functional performance, and mood in the three months following surgery. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), Kettle Test (KT), Physical Self Maintenance Scale (PSMS), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HD) measured global cognition, functional cognition, functional performance, and mood states, respectively. Thirteen male participants (ages 38 – 75) completed assessments at four time points  – when they were scheduled for surgery, within one week prior to surgery, before hospital discharge after surgery, and three months after surgery. ANOVA analyses were conducted on overall raw mean scores taken at these time points. Correlational analysis compared changes in cognition and functional performance of daily activities for this group. Effect size estimations and power analyses were conducted to estimate sample sizes needed for adequately powered subsequent study. Two measures (KT and PSMS) were adequately powered at 95% for the study sample. Functional cognition as measured by the KT improved significantly after surgery and surpassed baseline within three months after surgery. Functional performance as measured by the PSMS declined significantly after surgery but returned to baseline within three months after surgery. Global cognition as measured by the MoCA did not change, was not correlated with other measures, and was below norms at all time points. Mood states as measured by the HADS did not change and were above norms at all time points. This study had a small sample, only male participants, and one pooled group that did not allow for group comparisons. Two measures were self-reported, which may have impacted results due to responses biases. Despite these limitations, this is one of the first studies to track and compare both cognitive and functional performance changes over time. As such, this study may help practitioners and researchers improve and prioritize assessment and treatment options for individuals with cognitive and functional performance deficits after open heart surgery. Advisors/Committee Members: Tony Gentry, Al Copolillo, Diane Dodd-McCue.

Subjects/Keywords: Cognition; Functional performance; Occupational therapy; Open heart surgery; Occupational Therapy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fix, R. (2018). THE COGNITIVE AND FUNCTIONAL IMPACT OF OPEN HEART SURGERY: A PILOT STUDY INCLUDING THREE COMMON PROCEDURES (CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS GRAFT, HEART VALVE REPLACEMENT, AND LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE). (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Commonwealth University. Retrieved from https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/5345

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fix, Robert. “THE COGNITIVE AND FUNCTIONAL IMPACT OF OPEN HEART SURGERY: A PILOT STUDY INCLUDING THREE COMMON PROCEDURES (CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS GRAFT, HEART VALVE REPLACEMENT, AND LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE).” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Commonwealth University. Accessed November 18, 2019. https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/5345.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fix, Robert. “THE COGNITIVE AND FUNCTIONAL IMPACT OF OPEN HEART SURGERY: A PILOT STUDY INCLUDING THREE COMMON PROCEDURES (CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS GRAFT, HEART VALVE REPLACEMENT, AND LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE).” 2018. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Fix R. THE COGNITIVE AND FUNCTIONAL IMPACT OF OPEN HEART SURGERY: A PILOT STUDY INCLUDING THREE COMMON PROCEDURES (CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS GRAFT, HEART VALVE REPLACEMENT, AND LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2018. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/5345.

Council of Science Editors:

Fix R. THE COGNITIVE AND FUNCTIONAL IMPACT OF OPEN HEART SURGERY: A PILOT STUDY INCLUDING THREE COMMON PROCEDURES (CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS GRAFT, HEART VALVE REPLACEMENT, AND LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE). [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2018. Available from: https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/5345


Virginia Commonwealth University

3. Emery, Catherine E. Relieving Post-stroke Fatigue Using a Group-based Educational Training Approach.

Degree: PhD, Health Related Sciences, 2015, Virginia Commonwealth University

Post-stroke fatigue is a common problem that may limit participation in everyday activities. Emerging evidence suggests that group-based training in fatigue management may be an efficient means of reducing the effects of post-stroke fatigue. This mixed methods, quasi-experimental study proposed to determine whether a group-based educational program could be successful in relieving post-stroke fatigue and improving participation in daily activities. A convenience sample of stroke survivors (n=20) from retirement communities in southeastern PA were invited to participate in the research. Participants were screened for depression, motor and cognitive recovery, and sleep quality. Fatigue was measured using the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) and activity participation was measured using the Physical Self-Maintenance Scale- Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (PSMS-IADL). The measures were administered in a double pre-test, double post-test format over three seven-week phases; a non-intervention period; a group-based intervention period, and a post-intervention period. Qualitative information was gathered using a self-made Intervention Satisfaction Survey. Data analysis involved measures of central tendency for the demographic information. Tabulations of the survey responses were completed to judge the effectiveness of the group-based program or its’ components from the participants’ perspectives. Results indicated a statistically significant reduction in reported fatigue post-intervention (p= .022), which continued for seven-weeks (p= .240). There was a strong effect size for the post-intervention reduction of fatigue (r= .69). There was a trend toward improved participation in daily activities. Distribution across groups for presence of social support, age, sex, and level of care was found to be equivalent after one-way chi square analysis. There was no significant influence of these variables on fatigue or participation when used as grouping variables in RM-ANOVA. Participants reported feeling most confident scheduling activity to include rest periods and least confident managing sleep problems. Limitations include small sample size, demographics not being representative of the general stroke population, use of self-report measures with possible ceiling effect of PSMS-IADL, instrumentation effect given multiple administrations, and history effects as groups occurred at different time of the year. Overall, the results indicate that participation in a group-based educational program was effective in reducing post-stroke fatigue in chronic stroke. Advisors/Committee Members: Tony Gentry, PhD, OTR/L, Al Copolillo, PhD, OTR/L, J. James Cotter, PhD, Neil Penny, EdD, OTR/L.

Subjects/Keywords: stroke; cerebrovascular accident; fatigue; post-stroke fatigue; cognitive behavioral therapy; self-efficacy; group-based intervention; Occupational Therapy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Emery, C. E. (2015). Relieving Post-stroke Fatigue Using a Group-based Educational Training Approach. (Doctoral Dissertation). Virginia Commonwealth University. Retrieved from https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/3875

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Emery, Catherine E. “Relieving Post-stroke Fatigue Using a Group-based Educational Training Approach.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Virginia Commonwealth University. Accessed November 18, 2019. https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/3875.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Emery, Catherine E. “Relieving Post-stroke Fatigue Using a Group-based Educational Training Approach.” 2015. Web. 18 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Emery CE. Relieving Post-stroke Fatigue Using a Group-based Educational Training Approach. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 18]. Available from: https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/3875.

Council of Science Editors:

Emery CE. Relieving Post-stroke Fatigue Using a Group-based Educational Training Approach. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Virginia Commonwealth University; 2015. Available from: https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/3875

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