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You searched for +publisher:"Victoria University of Wellington" +contributor:("Walsh, Ken"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Victoria University of Wellington

1. Bunn, Sandra. An Exploration of the Transition of Patients From Intensive Care to the Ward Environment: a Ward Nursing Perspective.

Degree: 2007, Victoria University of Wellington

Background: The transition of patients from intensive care to the ward environment is a regular occurrence in intensive care. Today patients are often transferred earlier and sicker due to the demands for intensive care beds. This results in patients with higher acuity being cared for in the wards. Here ward nurses have to meet the ongoing complex demands of caring for higher acuity patients, alongside managing high patient-to-nurse ratios, staffing concerns, and varying levels of experienced nurses. Objective: This research explored the experiences of ward nurses receiving patients transferred from intensive care. The aims were to identify any areas of concern, highlight specific problems that occur on transition and to address what information is pertinent to ward nurses when receiving patients from intensive care. Methodology: A qualitative descriptive methodology using focus groups was utilised to gather information about these experiences. Three focus groups were held with ward nurses from various wards within the study setting hospital. All participants had considerable contact with intensive care and were familiar with the processes of transferring patients. Findings: Five themes emerged from the focus groups – Patients as intensive care staff say they are; Time to prepare the biggest thing; Documentation as a continuation of patient care; They forget what its like; and Families, a need to know about them. The theme Patients as intensive care staff say they are relates to reliable information sharing focused on the patient, their needs and condition. Participants expressed their concern that patients were not always in the condition that the intensive care staff stated they were on the referral. Having adequate time to prepare was considered important for the majority of ward nurses receiving patients from intensive care. Documentation was highlighted in the theme Documentation as a continuation of patient care particularly in relation to fluid balances and vital sign history. The theme They forget what its like suggests there is a perception that intensive care nurses have a lack of understanding of what the ward staff can actually manage. Decreased staffing levels during certain shift patterns and a lack of appropriately experienced staff on the wards is a common concern for ward nurses. Ward nurses also recognised that caring for families was part of their role. Patients and families may respond differently to the transfer process and their inclusion in transfer planning was seen as essential. Communication was a reoccurring element throughout all themes. Conclusion: Communication is the paramount factor that impacts on a ‘smooth transition’ for ward nurses. A ‘smooth transition’ refers to the transfer of patients from intensive care to the next level of care. Subsequently, nurses’ perceptions need to change, whereby transfer planning from ICU should be the focus rather than discharge planning. Transfer planning and education for all nursing staff is vital if the transfer process is to be improved.… Advisors/Committee Members: Walsh, Ken, Duke, Jan.

Subjects/Keywords: Nursing demands; Patient care levels; Continuity of care; Transitional care; Intensive care transfer; Transfer process; Qualitative descriptive; Ward care

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bunn, S. (2007). An Exploration of the Transition of Patients From Intensive Care to the Ward Environment: a Ward Nursing Perspective. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/139

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bunn, Sandra. “An Exploration of the Transition of Patients From Intensive Care to the Ward Environment: a Ward Nursing Perspective.” 2007. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed September 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/139.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bunn, Sandra. “An Exploration of the Transition of Patients From Intensive Care to the Ward Environment: a Ward Nursing Perspective.” 2007. Web. 20 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Bunn S. An Exploration of the Transition of Patients From Intensive Care to the Ward Environment: a Ward Nursing Perspective. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2007. [cited 2020 Sep 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/139.

Council of Science Editors:

Bunn S. An Exploration of the Transition of Patients From Intensive Care to the Ward Environment: a Ward Nursing Perspective. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/139


Victoria University of Wellington

2. Kingston, Mark Allen. What Does It Mean to Be a Lecturer in the Field of Nursing Education?.

Degree: 2008, Victoria University of Wellington

This thesis presents findings from a New Zealand phenomenological study that investigated the lived experience of lecturers in nursing education. I decided that this was a relevant research topic as little was known about this area, and in New Zealand there were no previous studies. I also had an interest in the topic because of my own experience of being a lecturer. I was interested to find out how lecturers negotiate their work worlds in the intensifying political climate of nursing education today. The methodology and method for the study was guided by Heideggerian hermeneutics. Open-ended interviews were conducted with five participants, all lecturers with between two and five years teaching experience. Four themes emerged: 'politics as destabilising/politics as strength gathering', 'commitment amidst uncertainty', 'content and process in the pursuit of teaching security', and 'being an insider and an outsider as a shifting space'. Dynamic and shifting experience in the themes reveals that 'being' a lecturer includes the experience of 'becoming' one, in which lecturers are constantly required to renew themselves in the changing world that surrounds them. Their interpretation of their 'being' is always 'on the way', reflecting Gadamer's (1987) argument about the process of interpretation in understanding experience. I argue that because lecturers' interpretation of their 'being' is influenced by their surrounding context, it is important to include this surrounding context in determining the answer to my research question 'what does it mean to be a lecturer in the field of nursing education?' Issues in this surrounding context include an intensifying political climate where there is an increased risk of experiencing burnout Four recommendations are made in response to the challenging issues that exist: first, for lecturers to engage in curriculum development; second, establish learning communities; third, undertake professional supervision; and fourth, lobby policy makers at a local and national level to effect change. In spite of this shifting and challenging context and the issues inside it, I contend that my participants' experience of 'being' a lecturer is determined more tellingly from a second philosophical vantage point in heideggerian hermeneutic phenomenology, that argued by Heidegger (1962) of an ontology of Being. In my participants' experience, their 'being' includes commitment that they don't let go of easily. I argue this is because their commitment is deep and spiritual, of the kind that parents also experience with their children. I argue that what it means to be a lecturer is determined more by this deep commitment in my participants' 'being' than what is happening in the context that surrounds them. They are always 'becoming' as lecturers as they interpret their experience in their shifting and changing world, but their 'being' remains committed whatever pressures their surrounding context brings. I argue that because of the fortitude in their 'being', lecturers have the potential to enact some… Advisors/Committee Members: Walsh, Chris, Walsh, Ken.

Subjects/Keywords: Phenomenology; Lectures and lecturing; Nursing education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kingston, M. A. (2008). What Does It Mean to Be a Lecturer in the Field of Nursing Education?. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/846

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kingston, Mark Allen. “What Does It Mean to Be a Lecturer in the Field of Nursing Education?.” 2008. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed September 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/846.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kingston, Mark Allen. “What Does It Mean to Be a Lecturer in the Field of Nursing Education?.” 2008. Web. 20 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Kingston MA. What Does It Mean to Be a Lecturer in the Field of Nursing Education?. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2008. [cited 2020 Sep 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/846.

Council of Science Editors:

Kingston MA. What Does It Mean to Be a Lecturer in the Field of Nursing Education?. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/846

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