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You searched for +publisher:"Victoria University of Wellington" +contributor:("Taylor, Mike"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Victoria University of Wellington

1. Moeung, Sovannden. Research-led teaching in higher education: Perspectives of Cambodian and New Zealand academics.

Degree: 2013, Victoria University of Wellington

Research and teaching are the core mission of most universities in the "knowledge society" during the 21st century. However, the exact nature of the connection between research and teaching is not obvious. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to contribute to the debate by investigating how research was used to inform teaching and to benefit student learning. The study also intended to identify the benefits and drawbacks of Research-Led Teaching (RLT) for academics as well as to examine what scholars considered to be the main supports and challenges academics experienced while practicing RLT. A qualitative single-case study was employed for this study. The perceptions and experiences from twelve academics from a university in Cambodia and another in New Zealand (NZ) were collected using semi-structure interviews. Official documents such as university policy, position descriptions from each university and course outlines or syllabi from each participant were collected for the purpose of document analysis. This study provided an understanding of RLT and the current practices of academics. Four conceptualizations of RLT emerged: teaching informed by academics' own research; teaching informed by other people's recent research; teaching that promoted student engagement in research; and teaching informed by academics' performance research. The findings indicated that the benefits of RLT outweigh the drawbacks. The lack of support was the main challenge for Cambodian participants. However, some participants suggested personal commitment, and institution accountability were important factors that support RLT. Perceptions and experiences that academics in Cambodian and NZ tertiary education have about the practices of RLT provide a useful basis for consideration of possible changes and how to implement such changes. Recommendations to enhance the practice of RLT include the emphasis of RLT in position descriptions and strategies to promote the implementation of RLT in institutions to ensure the improvement of student learning. Academic professional development and university supports are also needed for enhancing RLT practices. Advisors/Committee Members: Taylor, Mike, Jones, Elizabeth.

Subjects/Keywords: Research-led teaching; Higher education; Academics

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APA (6th Edition):

Moeung, S. (2013). Research-led teaching in higher education: Perspectives of Cambodian and New Zealand academics. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3056

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moeung, Sovannden. “Research-led teaching in higher education: Perspectives of Cambodian and New Zealand academics.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3056.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moeung, Sovannden. “Research-led teaching in higher education: Perspectives of Cambodian and New Zealand academics.” 2013. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Moeung S. Research-led teaching in higher education: Perspectives of Cambodian and New Zealand academics. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2013. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3056.

Council of Science Editors:

Moeung S. Research-led teaching in higher education: Perspectives of Cambodian and New Zealand academics. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3056

2. Cárdenas, César A. Interactions Between Sponges and Macroalgae on Temperate Rocky Reefs.

Degree: 2014, Victoria University of Wellington

Changes in the distributions of organisms not only alter community composition and food web structure, but also can initiate important changes at the ecosystem level. Understanding the interactions between biotic and abiotic factors affecting species’ distribution patterns in temperate habitats is important for predicting responses to future environmental change. Sponges are important members of temperate rocky reefs assemblages that are influenced by a number of abiotic factors including water movement, light regime, inclination and stability of the substratum, as well as complex ecological interactions. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the interactions between sponges and macroalgae on shallow-water rocky reefs of Wellington, New Zealand, assessing if the distribution patterns of sponges are independent of algal populations. I used a combination of surveys, and manipulative field and laboratory experiments to explore the existence of interactions (positive or negative) between sponges and macroalgae and also to explore the effect of environmental factors on the distribution and abundance of temperate sponges. My first objective was to determine if the spatial distribution patterns of sponges are independent of macroalgae distribution and abundance at different sites on the Wellington south coast (Chapter 2). The results showed that abundance of most sponge species were strongly correlated with inclination, which supports previous studies in the northern hemisphere suggesting that sponge abundance and algal abundance are negatively correlated. In contrast, only a few sponge species were positively correlated with algal abundance. I then explored the positive interactions occurring between some sponges species and the presence of canopy-forming algae (Chapter 3). Results from this chapter suggest the canopy of Ecklonia radiata facilitates the existence of some sponge species such as Crella incrustans on vertical rocky walls. The removal of Ecklonia canopy led to a community dominated by turf algae, which corresponded with a decrease in sponge abundance and richness. My results suggest that the Ecklonia canopy facilitates the presence of some sponge species and allows their coexistence with turf algae underneath the canopy and also by altering immediate physical factors that may be detrimental for some sponge species. To further explore the existence of sponges and understory algae, I used an experimental approach (Chapter 4) to investigate the effect of the brown alga Zonaria turneriana on Leucetta sp. and also mechanisms involved in the interactions. However results from this chapter provided no evidence to support previous hypotheses that understory algae negatively affect sponges. In the last data chapter (Chapter 5), I studied sponges inhabiting different habitats in order to test if environmental variation affects the abundance and diversity of microorganisms, hence having the potential to affect the distribution and abundance of these species The stability observed in bacterial communities among… Advisors/Committee Members: Bell, James, Davy, Simon, Taylor, Mike.

Subjects/Keywords: Sponges; Macroalgae; Rocky reefs

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cárdenas, C. A. (2014). Interactions Between Sponges and Macroalgae on Temperate Rocky Reefs. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3616

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cárdenas, César A. “Interactions Between Sponges and Macroalgae on Temperate Rocky Reefs.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3616.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cárdenas, César A. “Interactions Between Sponges and Macroalgae on Temperate Rocky Reefs.” 2014. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Cárdenas CA. Interactions Between Sponges and Macroalgae on Temperate Rocky Reefs. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2014. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3616.

Council of Science Editors:

Cárdenas CA. Interactions Between Sponges and Macroalgae on Temperate Rocky Reefs. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3616


Victoria University of Wellington

3. Forrest, Barrie. Managing Risks from Invasive Marine Species: Is Post-Border Management Feasible?.

Degree: 2007, Victoria University of Wellington

Non-indigenous marine species are a major threat to marine environments and economies globally. This thesis examines whether management of pest organisms post-border (i.e, after they have established in New Zealand) is feasible in the marine environment, using the non-indigenous Asian kelp Undaria pinnatifida as a model organism. Background information on Undaria in Chapter 2 recognises the paucity of information on Undaria's impacts. Hence, Chapter 3 investigates ecological effects from Undaria in a low shore rocky habitat. Although negligible effects were described, the uncertainty in extrapolating findings to other places and times means that the precautionary principle should be applied by managers, and 'worst-case' impacts assumed. Chapter 4 investigates mechanisms for Undaria's natural dispersal, and describes strategies based on spore release and sporophyte drift that may lead to spread over scales of metres to kilometres. This work highlights the importance of human transport vectors (especially vessels and aquaculture) in the post-border spread of Undaria at regional and national scales. Hence, a case study in Chapter 5 describes aquaculture activities that could be vectors for spread of Undaria in New Zealand, and presents criteria for identifying present and future high risk pathways. Chapters 6 and 7 describe methods to reduce the accidental transport of Undaria and other biofouling pests with aquaculture, with a focus on mussel farming. Treatments based on water blasting, air drying and freshwater immersion provide low cost options for equipment such as floats and rope. For treatment of mussel seed-stock, immersion in dilute (4%) acetic acid (the active ingredient in vinegar) is identified as a method that could eliminate Undaria and other soft-bodied fouling organisms without resulting in an unacceptable level of mussel mortality. Chapter 8 proposes a risk-based framework for setting post-border management priorities based on the feasibility, benefits and costs of risk reduction. This chapter elucidates how knowledge generated from research in Chapters 2-7 can be used in a biosecurity risk management context. It shows that effective management post-border is possible even when pest organisms become relatively well established, and that the benefits gained from even limited successes have the potential to greatly outweigh the consequences of uncontrolled invasion. However, as unwanted species become increasingly widespread, management will become increasingly focussed on the protection of specific values. Chapter 9 extends some of the ideas proposed in Chapter 8, and considers a broad postborder management framework for marine pests. A comprehensive system should consist of vector management, surveillance, and incursion response that targets particular pests or suites of functionally similar species (e.g., biofouling organisms), coupled with generic vector management approaches that aim to reduce humanmediated transport of all organisms at a national scale. New Zealand's geographic isolation and low… Advisors/Committee Members: Taylor, Mike, Gardner, Jonathan.

Subjects/Keywords: Exotic species; Marine biology; Pest eradication; Environment management; Management methods

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Forrest, B. (2007). Managing Risks from Invasive Marine Species: Is Post-Border Management Feasible?. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/311

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Forrest, Barrie. “Managing Risks from Invasive Marine Species: Is Post-Border Management Feasible?.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed February 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/311.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Forrest, Barrie. “Managing Risks from Invasive Marine Species: Is Post-Border Management Feasible?.” 2007. Web. 22 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Forrest B. Managing Risks from Invasive Marine Species: Is Post-Border Management Feasible?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2007. [cited 2019 Feb 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/311.

Council of Science Editors:

Forrest B. Managing Risks from Invasive Marine Species: Is Post-Border Management Feasible?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/311

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