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You searched for +publisher:"Victoria University of Wellington" +contributor:("Stephens, Robert"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Victoria University of Wellington

1. Stenerud, Tor-Espen. Child Poverty and Policy - A Comparison of New Zealand and Scandinavia.

Degree: 2009, Victoria University of Wellington

This thesis provides a comparative analysis of poverty among children in New Zealand, Norway and Sweden using the most recent available income data from year 2000. By comparing different countries with different levels of poverty, and differing policies it attempts to say something about the causes of child poverty and evaluate the importance of policy as a remedy. This is done within one theoretical framework and understanding of what poverty is and why it is important. More specifically, the purpose is to explore to what extent policy in the form of benefits (and taxes) explain the differences in child poverty, in this case why children in New Zealand are so much more likely to be poor than those in Norway and Sweden. This is in part done by a process of elimination, where poverty levels before and after taxes and transfers are compared in various sectors of the population divided by demographic, ethnic, educational, employment status and other factors. Even though the picture formed by the findings is complex and far from straight forward, and policy differences cannot explain all the differences, policy variables are fundamental in explaining the differences in child poverty levels. In order to summarize the findings in a more accessible way the last part of the thesis puts together findings from previous chapters by asking a counterfactual 'what if?' question, based on the statistics in chapter 4 and 5. It estimates what the impact would have been on child poverty levels in various groups in the New Zealand community if its policy had achieved the same rate of poverty reduction as the equivalent groups experience in Scandinavia. In the counterfactual chapter the importance of differences across the countries in demographic composition and market income (i.e. the income before government intervention through taxes and benefits) are also tested for. This way of presenting the findings further reinforces the image of complexity with few straightforward causal mechanisms. However, while the thesis shows that many variables play a role in explaining the variation in outcome across the countries, it leaves little room for doubting that much of this variation must be explained by government intervention. There is, in other words, scope for governments to reduce poverty more than the New Zealand policies did in year 2000. Advisors/Committee Members: Stephens, Robert, Roberts, Nigel.

Subjects/Keywords: Income; Public policy; Poverty; Children

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APA (6th Edition):

Stenerud, T. (2009). Child Poverty and Policy - A Comparison of New Zealand and Scandinavia. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1170

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stenerud, Tor-Espen. “Child Poverty and Policy - A Comparison of New Zealand and Scandinavia.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed March 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1170.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stenerud, Tor-Espen. “Child Poverty and Policy - A Comparison of New Zealand and Scandinavia.” 2009. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Stenerud T. Child Poverty and Policy - A Comparison of New Zealand and Scandinavia. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2009. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1170.

Council of Science Editors:

Stenerud T. Child Poverty and Policy - A Comparison of New Zealand and Scandinavia. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1170


Victoria University of Wellington

2. Scott, William Guy. Economic Evaluation Applied to Health Policy in New Zealand.

Degree: 2001, Victoria University of Wellington

Data available in the public domain are frequently aggregated to preserve confidentiality and to reduce a database to a manageable size. Drawing conclusions from such data may lead to inappropriate policy advice. The aims of this paper are to show how the aggregation of data to form rates may obscure important information and lead to misinterpretation of results. Suggestions are offered on ways in which this problem may be addressed. We also highlight the need to seek additional information in order to clarify findings. We used a case study approach by drawing on illustrative examples to highlight some problems encountered when using aggregated data about population. The focus is on health policy. Two types of problem were discussed in the cases chosen, but a common resolution was appropriate. In the first case policies based on the assumption that hospital admissions equate with disease incidence would be different from policies framed on actual incidence data. In the second, incidence rates changed when they were disaggregated to gender and age-specific rates. Policies formulated from analysis of aggregated data would be different form those based on disaggregated data. In the cases studied, the variables of gender, age and ethnicity influence incidence rates and must not be ignored. Researchers are recommended to study the data-set in the most disaggregated form available, and to check how data have been defined, collected and recorded, before preparing summary tables and graphs. Additional research or data from another source may be needed to clarify findings. Advisors/Committee Members: Stephens, Robert, Scott, Claudia.

Subjects/Keywords: Health datasets; Data collection; Government policy; Data analysis

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APA (6th Edition):

Scott, W. G. (2001). Economic Evaluation Applied to Health Policy in New Zealand. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/584

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Scott, William Guy. “Economic Evaluation Applied to Health Policy in New Zealand.” 2001. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed March 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/584.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Scott, William Guy. “Economic Evaluation Applied to Health Policy in New Zealand.” 2001. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Scott WG. Economic Evaluation Applied to Health Policy in New Zealand. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2001. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/584.

Council of Science Editors:

Scott WG. Economic Evaluation Applied to Health Policy in New Zealand. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2001. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/584


Victoria University of Wellington

3. Nolan, Patrick John. Targeting Families' Assistance: Evaluating Family and Employment Tax Credits in New Zealand's Tax-Benefit System.

Degree: 2005, Victoria University of Wellington

In 2004 the Labour-led government announced a series of tax-benefit reforms (the Working for Families reforms) that will account for an estimated $1.17 billion per-annum of new spending when fully implemented by 1 April 2007. These reforms aim to both reduce rates of child poverty and improve financial incentives for paid work at low wages, particularly for caregivers. Changes to family and employment tax credits (the Family Assistance programmes) are central to these reforms. This study reviews methods for measuring the effectiveness of family and employment tax credits, evaluates the Working for Families reforms, and considers possible improvements to Working for Families. Questions that this study considers are: What roles should family and employment tax credits play in tax-benefit systems? How should family and employment tax credits be designed? Should eligibility for assistance reflect work effort as opposed to family structure? What lessons do historical and comparative perspectives on Working for Families provide? Will New Zealand's Working for Families reforms achieve the optimal design and role of family and employment tax credits? What improvements, if any, could be made to the Working for Families reforms? This study concludes that the Working for Families reforms represent significant income redistribution towards families with children but little change will be made to the overall design of the Family Assistance programmes, some of which have remained largely unchanged since 1986. Working for Families does not fully address the need to reform the Family Assistance programmes in the light of important social and economic changes that have taken place over the last two decades, such as the breakdown of the breadwinner model of social arrangements and the liberalisation of the labour market. This study thus considers a number of improvements to Working for Families, ranging from simplifying the structure of the Family Assistance Tax Credits to a more radical redesign of these programmes. This study concludes that more clearly established policy priorities and a greater understanding of the relative effectiveness of different tax-benefit instruments are required if New Zealand is to develop a tax-benefit system that achieves a desired level of redistribution to families with children at least economic cost. Advisors/Committee Members: Callister, Paul, Stephens, Robert.

Subjects/Keywords: Welfare services; NZ family policy; Tax-benefit reforms

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nolan, P. J. (2005). Targeting Families' Assistance: Evaluating Family and Employment Tax Credits in New Zealand's Tax-Benefit System. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/707

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nolan, Patrick John. “Targeting Families' Assistance: Evaluating Family and Employment Tax Credits in New Zealand's Tax-Benefit System.” 2005. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed March 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/707.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nolan, Patrick John. “Targeting Families' Assistance: Evaluating Family and Employment Tax Credits in New Zealand's Tax-Benefit System.” 2005. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Nolan PJ. Targeting Families' Assistance: Evaluating Family and Employment Tax Credits in New Zealand's Tax-Benefit System. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2005. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/707.

Council of Science Editors:

Nolan PJ. Targeting Families' Assistance: Evaluating Family and Employment Tax Credits in New Zealand's Tax-Benefit System. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2005. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/707

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