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You searched for +publisher:"Victoria University of Wellington" +contributor:("Snyder, Benjamin"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Victoria University of Wellington

1. Lockyer, Orin. 'It's either Maccas or uni': A Bourdieusian analysis of working-class youth in New Zealand.

Degree: 2018, Victoria University of Wellington

School to work transitions is often presented as a binary choice. You either pursue a university education that is framed as a sure-fire pathway to both social and economic mobility, or you pursue a ‘lesser’ form of industrial and vocational training, with little of hope of advancement. However, this thesis argues that this assumption must be contested, as it obscures the complexity of all school to work transitions and the potential for social mobility in these ‘lesser’ forms of education. Through interviews with young men and women who are training as an apprentice or have recently completed their apprenticeship, this thesis hopes to provide a more complex snapshot of school to work transitions, focusing on how apprentices find and adapt to their new trade. My overall argument centres on Bourdieu’s theory of practice which is often discussed concerning the specific class-based outcomes of education for students from different class conditions (Bourdieu 1977). While this approach is useful to showing the complexity of school to work transitions from supposedly ‘lesser’ pathways, this approach is overly reliant on habitus, presenting a type of individual agency that is primarily reproductive and non-conducive to any potential transformation. Instead of focusing on just habitus in understanding this transition, a greater emphasis is placed on Bourdieu’s concept of ‘field’. Specifically, how field conditions can influence both the degree and the type of agency within a field, presenting a more complicated conception of agency that can be simultaneously reproductive and transformative. Advisors/Committee Members: Snyder, Benjamin, Taylor, Dylan.

Subjects/Keywords: Bourdieu; Work; Habitus; Agency

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lockyer, O. (2018). 'It's either Maccas or uni': A Bourdieusian analysis of working-class youth in New Zealand. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/7036

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lockyer, Orin. “'It's either Maccas or uni': A Bourdieusian analysis of working-class youth in New Zealand.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed April 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/7036.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lockyer, Orin. “'It's either Maccas or uni': A Bourdieusian analysis of working-class youth in New Zealand.” 2018. Web. 04 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Lockyer O. 'It's either Maccas or uni': A Bourdieusian analysis of working-class youth in New Zealand. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2018. [cited 2020 Apr 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/7036.

Council of Science Editors:

Lockyer O. 'It's either Maccas or uni': A Bourdieusian analysis of working-class youth in New Zealand. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/7036

2. Mulholland, Catriana. Conversations from the Coalface: Positive Asymmetry and the Culture of Silence that Surrounds the Pike River Mine Tragedy.

Degree: 2018, Victoria University of Wellington

Charles Perrow (1999) once famously noted ‘Where body counting replaces social and cultural values and excludes us from participating in decisions about the risks that a few have decided the many cannot do without, the issue is not risk, but power.’ This dissertation explores positive asymmetry (Cerulo 2006) and the culture of silence that surrounds Pike River Mine disaster that killed 29 men on the West Coast of Aotearoa/New Zealand on 19 November 2010. This asymmetry involves habitual ways of thinking and behaving which increase the propensity to ignore an approaching worst case scenario in order to meet intended outcomes. Increasingly lauded in ‘get rich quick’ cultures, positive asymmetry can be lethal in mining and other hazardous workplaces where there is pressure to meet demands of the market that override pre-existing flaws in systems and culture, and it is often accompanied by practices of eclipsing (acts of banishing, physical seclusion, shunning) clouding (impressionism, shadowing) and recasting (rhetorical, prescriptive behaviours). There is a culture of silence that accompanies this cognitive symmetry in relation to the case of Pike River Mine which existed from its early development and continues years after the fatalities in a culture of socially organised denial; which is one in which there is a collective distancing among individuals due to norms of emotion, conversation and attention (Norgaard 2011). What happened at Pike River Mine was not the result of an attention deficit model. There was plenty of information. The mine had some good safety systems. They were not utilised. So what was going on? In this thesis, I look to the James Reason Model of Accident Causation used before the Royal Commission of Inquiry into the disaster and argue that although this does well to describe risk and to illustrate accident causation as a failure of organizational systems, it cannot as a structural model possibly describe the cultural logic and power dynamics which lay beneath the competition driving decision-makers within these systems. Pike River Mine was a case of deliberate risk and hibernating beneath that risk was (and still can be) a base of unchecked power. It follows that any ‘errortolerant’ systems we design for safer workplaces will only work insofar as there is an ‘error-intolerant culture’ inside the industry. Pike River Mine was not an isolated incident and if we fail to look to the power that lay behind that deliberate risk taking, there will be more ‘Pikes’ to come. There exists a triple helix to this tragedy consisting of power, risk and asymmetry. In practising vigilance, we need to look to the junction of these three, for therein lies the perfect storm of conditions for future human tragedy and financial disaster in whichever industry chooses to practice it. Advisors/Committee Members: Grey, Sandra, Snyder, Benjamin.

Subjects/Keywords: Coal mining; Tragedy; Disaster; Risk; Silence; Power; Positive asymmetry; Social policy; Health and safety; Work safety; Workplace fatalities; Workplace accidents

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mulholland, C. (2018). Conversations from the Coalface: Positive Asymmetry and the Culture of Silence that Surrounds the Pike River Mine Tragedy. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/7952

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mulholland, Catriana. “Conversations from the Coalface: Positive Asymmetry and the Culture of Silence that Surrounds the Pike River Mine Tragedy.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed April 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/7952.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mulholland, Catriana. “Conversations from the Coalface: Positive Asymmetry and the Culture of Silence that Surrounds the Pike River Mine Tragedy.” 2018. Web. 04 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Mulholland C. Conversations from the Coalface: Positive Asymmetry and the Culture of Silence that Surrounds the Pike River Mine Tragedy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2018. [cited 2020 Apr 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/7952.

Council of Science Editors:

Mulholland C. Conversations from the Coalface: Positive Asymmetry and the Culture of Silence that Surrounds the Pike River Mine Tragedy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/7952

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