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You searched for +publisher:"Victoria University of Wellington" +contributor:("Phillips, Brian"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Victoria University of Wellington

1. Entwistle, Mark. Women only? an Exploration of the Place of Men within Nursing.

Degree: 2004, Victoria University of Wellington

This dissertation came out of my wondering why there are still so few men going into nursing especially when one considers that the history of nursing reveals men have been a part of nursing for a long time. In New Zealand it is only since the mid seventies that men have been able to gain the exact same nursing qualifications as their women colleagues. Men in nursing are still seen as unusual in that they work in a predominantly female occupation and have had their masculinity questioned by the myth that all men in nursing must be gay. There is also the notion that caring is a difficult task for men and is seen by society as a uniquely feminine ability. Both issues are related to dominant notions of masculinity. In addition to this there is currently a crisis in terms of a nursing shortage and it has been suggested that one way to resolve this crisis is to encourage more men into nursing. Thus this exploration as to why there are so few men in nursing is timely. Men who choose nursing as a career risk challenging the traditional roles of their gender stereotype. A comprehensive search of the literature from different disciplines reveals deeper issues than just the commonly held assumption that nursing is not masculine. Exploring the issues of gender with a particular focus on masculinity has uncovered the concept of hegemonic masculinity. This describes how gender is practiced in a way that legitimises patriarchy, reinforcing the dominant position of men over i women as well as over other groups of men. It is these patriarchal attitudes that have seen men marginalised within nursing. On the one hand men in nursing could be seen as challenging the current dominant masculine ideal. However, on the other hand men in nursing may not challenge this hegemonic masculinity; instead often supporting the status quo in an effort to maintain their own masculinity. The implication for nursing, if it is to increase the numbers of men in the profession, is to challenge this notion of hegemonic masculinity. This needs to be done appropriately by critically examining this concept rather than by merely replacing one hegemony with another. A greater awareness of how hegemonic masculinity and notions of gender have historically affected, and continue to affect the development of nursing is important. However, issues of gender and masculinity have often been overlooked in nursing education. It is now time for nursing education to include a critical exploration of gender issues and how it relates to men as part of undergraduate nursing education for both men and women students. Advisors/Committee Members: Phillips, Brian.

Subjects/Keywords: Men in nursing; Dominant notions of masculinity; Gender stereotype; Hegemonic masculinity; Development of nursing; Nursing education; Nursing, the profession; Cultural safety; Curriculum development; Gender issues; Men's health; Literature review

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APA (6th Edition):

Entwistle, M. (2004). Women only? an Exploration of the Place of Men within Nursing. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/35

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Entwistle, Mark. “Women only? an Exploration of the Place of Men within Nursing.” 2004. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed August 08, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/35.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Entwistle, Mark. “Women only? an Exploration of the Place of Men within Nursing.” 2004. Web. 08 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Entwistle M. Women only? an Exploration of the Place of Men within Nursing. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2004. [cited 2020 Aug 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/35.

Council of Science Editors:

Entwistle M. Women only? an Exploration of the Place of Men within Nursing. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2004. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/35


Victoria University of Wellington

2. Kempthorne, Anna. Why do Nurse Graduates Choose to Work in the Area of Mental Health?.

Degree: 2006, Victoria University of Wellington

The low numbers of nurses attracted to work in mental health is a concern particularly with the increased demand for mental health services. Strategies are required to increase recruitment to this less popular area of nursing to ensure that a high quality of care is provided for people suffering from mental illness. The World Health Organisation (2004) is aware that this area of health has been neglected and that it is time to promote mental health. This study aimed to examine the influences involved in nurses choosing to work in this area. A descriptive survey using a questionnaire was given to seven groups of new graduates enrolled in the New Graduate Mental Health Nursing programme through five educational institutes within New Zealand. At the time of writing there were no published studies around this topic in New Zealand. This study will attempt to inform nurses, the Nursing Council of New Zealand, tertiary institutions and the government of New Zealand that there is evidence that we need to develop and change practices to address the predicted workforce decline. Advisors/Committee Members: Phillips, Brian.

Subjects/Keywords: Mental health; New graduate; Evidence based practice; Descriptive survey; Questionnaire survey

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kempthorne, A. (2006). Why do Nurse Graduates Choose to Work in the Area of Mental Health?. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/40

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kempthorne, Anna. “Why do Nurse Graduates Choose to Work in the Area of Mental Health?.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed August 08, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/40.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kempthorne, Anna. “Why do Nurse Graduates Choose to Work in the Area of Mental Health?.” 2006. Web. 08 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Kempthorne A. Why do Nurse Graduates Choose to Work in the Area of Mental Health?. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2006. [cited 2020 Aug 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/40.

Council of Science Editors:

Kempthorne A. Why do Nurse Graduates Choose to Work in the Area of Mental Health?. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/40


Victoria University of Wellington

3. Ramsamy, Krishnasamy. Colonisation: the Experience of a Psychiatric Nurse Through the Lens of Reflective Autobiography.

Degree: 2006, Victoria University of Wellington

The oppression of colonization lives on in the daily lives of colonized people. It is vital for us as nurses to understand the effects of that oppression, as well as the restrictive impacts, and dislocation from one's land and culture to-day. Nurses come from both the descendants of colonisers and the colonised. This thesis is a journey and a quest for insights into the impacts and significances of colonisation by looking at historical and socio-political contexts that have bearing on the health of colonised people who remain mostly powerless and marginalized. It is prompted in response to a cultural safety model which advocates that nurses should become familiar with their own background and history in order to be culturally safe in practice. This reflective autobiographical account is a personal effort and provides the foundation for an exploration of issues during nursing practice encounters, from a colonised ethnic minority perspective. The method was informed by Moustakas research approach and Johnstone's Reflective Topical Autobiographical process. The selection of specific events are deliberate, to make visible some of the many barriers that exist within our health structures as pertinent issues for non-dominant cultures that remain on the margin of our society. Maori issues provide a contrast and became a catalyst for me as the author while working for kaupapa Maori services in Aotearoa/New Zealand. The intention of this thesis is to generate new knowledge about what it means to be a nurse from an ethnic minority working in a kaupapa Maori mental health service, and to encourage other nurses to explore these issues further. Some recommendations are made for nurses in the last chapter, as I believe that they are ideally situated to build upon the strengths indigenous people already have and contribute positively toward the improvement of poor health outcomes of the colonized people in an embracing and collective way. Advisors/Committee Members: Bickley, Joy, Phillips, Brian, McEldowney, Rose.

Subjects/Keywords: Social conditioning; Nursing practice; Mental health; Cultural safety; Reflective practice; Maori mental health service; Kaupapa maori services; Reflective topical autobiography; Deep reflective process; Personal story

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ramsamy, K. (2006). Colonisation: the Experience of a Psychiatric Nurse Through the Lens of Reflective Autobiography. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/60

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ramsamy, Krishnasamy. “Colonisation: the Experience of a Psychiatric Nurse Through the Lens of Reflective Autobiography.” 2006. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed August 08, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/60.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ramsamy, Krishnasamy. “Colonisation: the Experience of a Psychiatric Nurse Through the Lens of Reflective Autobiography.” 2006. Web. 08 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Ramsamy K. Colonisation: the Experience of a Psychiatric Nurse Through the Lens of Reflective Autobiography. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2006. [cited 2020 Aug 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/60.

Council of Science Editors:

Ramsamy K. Colonisation: the Experience of a Psychiatric Nurse Through the Lens of Reflective Autobiography. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2006. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/60

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