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You searched for +publisher:"Victoria University of Wellington" +contributor:("Grimshaw, Gina"). Showing records 1 – 23 of 23 total matches.

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Victoria University of Wellington

1. Humphrey, Megan. A Signal Detection Approach to the Perception of Affective Prosody in Anxious Individuals: A Developmental Study.

Degree: 2009, Victoria University of Wellington

 The present study used a Signal Detection approach to the study of prosody perception in children and adults who self-reported high levels of anxiety. Seventy-one… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Emotion recognition; Social phobia

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APA (6th Edition):

Humphrey, M. (2009). A Signal Detection Approach to the Perception of Affective Prosody in Anxious Individuals: A Developmental Study. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1255

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Humphrey, Megan. “A Signal Detection Approach to the Perception of Affective Prosody in Anxious Individuals: A Developmental Study.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1255.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Humphrey, Megan. “A Signal Detection Approach to the Perception of Affective Prosody in Anxious Individuals: A Developmental Study.” 2009. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Humphrey M. A Signal Detection Approach to the Perception of Affective Prosody in Anxious Individuals: A Developmental Study. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1255.

Council of Science Editors:

Humphrey M. A Signal Detection Approach to the Perception of Affective Prosody in Anxious Individuals: A Developmental Study. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1255


Victoria University of Wellington

2. Walsh, Amy. Words and Faces on Left and Right: Perceptual Asymmetries as a Marker for SSRI Responsiveness.

Degree: 2010, Victoria University of Wellington

 Vulnerability to depression has been associated with greater relative right hemisphere frontal activity, as measured by EEG recordings of alpha activity. However, there is much… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Depression (Psychology); Serotonin uptake inhibitors; SSRI; Perceptual asymmetry

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APA (6th Edition):

Walsh, A. (2010). Words and Faces on Left and Right: Perceptual Asymmetries as a Marker for SSRI Responsiveness. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1394

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Walsh, Amy. “Words and Faces on Left and Right: Perceptual Asymmetries as a Marker for SSRI Responsiveness.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1394.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Walsh, Amy. “Words and Faces on Left and Right: Perceptual Asymmetries as a Marker for SSRI Responsiveness.” 2010. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Walsh A. Words and Faces on Left and Right: Perceptual Asymmetries as a Marker for SSRI Responsiveness. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2010. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1394.

Council of Science Editors:

Walsh A. Words and Faces on Left and Right: Perceptual Asymmetries as a Marker for SSRI Responsiveness. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1394


Victoria University of Wellington

3. Godfrey, Hazel K. Conceptual Metaphors of Emotion in Spoken Language: Good Is Up in Semantics and Prosody.

Degree: 2011, Victoria University of Wellington

 Recent research on embodied cognition points to a role for the perceptuomotor system in conceptual representation. One way that the perceptuomotor system may be involved… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Emotion; Speech; Representation

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APA (6th Edition):

Godfrey, H. K. (2011). Conceptual Metaphors of Emotion in Spoken Language: Good Is Up in Semantics and Prosody. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1857

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Godfrey, Hazel K. “Conceptual Metaphors of Emotion in Spoken Language: Good Is Up in Semantics and Prosody.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1857.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Godfrey, Hazel K. “Conceptual Metaphors of Emotion in Spoken Language: Good Is Up in Semantics and Prosody.” 2011. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Godfrey HK. Conceptual Metaphors of Emotion in Spoken Language: Good Is Up in Semantics and Prosody. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1857.

Council of Science Editors:

Godfrey HK. Conceptual Metaphors of Emotion in Spoken Language: Good Is Up in Semantics and Prosody. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1857


Victoria University of Wellington

4. Foster, Joshua James. Attention Capture by Angry Faces Depends on the Distribution of Attention.

Degree: 2013, Victoria University of Wellington

 The threat-capture hypothesis posits a threat-detection system that automatically directs visual attention to threat-related stimuli (e.g., angry facial expressions) in the environment. Importantly, this system… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Attention; Emotion; Event related potentials

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APA (6th Edition):

Foster, J. J. (2013). Attention Capture by Angry Faces Depends on the Distribution of Attention. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2749

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Foster, Joshua James. “Attention Capture by Angry Faces Depends on the Distribution of Attention.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2749.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Foster, Joshua James. “Attention Capture by Angry Faces Depends on the Distribution of Attention.” 2013. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Foster JJ. Attention Capture by Angry Faces Depends on the Distribution of Attention. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2749.

Council of Science Editors:

Foster JJ. Attention Capture by Angry Faces Depends on the Distribution of Attention. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2749


Victoria University of Wellington

5. Hunkin, Lisa Michelle. Engagement with angry faces during attentional bias modification: Insights from the N2pc.

Degree: 2014, Victoria University of Wellington

 Healthy individuals show an attentional bias toward threat, and this bias is exaggerated in anxious individuals. Recent studies have shown that training anxious individuals to… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Attention; ERP; Threat

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APA (6th Edition):

Hunkin, L. M. (2014). Engagement with angry faces during attentional bias modification: Insights from the N2pc. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3443

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hunkin, Lisa Michelle. “Engagement with angry faces during attentional bias modification: Insights from the N2pc.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3443.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hunkin, Lisa Michelle. “Engagement with angry faces during attentional bias modification: Insights from the N2pc.” 2014. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hunkin LM. Engagement with angry faces during attentional bias modification: Insights from the N2pc. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3443.

Council of Science Editors:

Hunkin LM. Engagement with angry faces during attentional bias modification: Insights from the N2pc. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3443


Victoria University of Wellington

6. Murphy, Justin. EEG evidence for the effective proactive control of emotional distraction.

Degree: 2016, Victoria University of Wellington

 Recent behavioural studies using an emotional flanker task have found that task-irrelevent emotional images are more distracting than neutral images under infrequent, but not frequent,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: EEG; Emotion; Proactive

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APA (6th Edition):

Murphy, J. (2016). EEG evidence for the effective proactive control of emotional distraction. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5324

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Murphy, Justin. “EEG evidence for the effective proactive control of emotional distraction.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5324.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Murphy, Justin. “EEG evidence for the effective proactive control of emotional distraction.” 2016. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Murphy J. EEG evidence for the effective proactive control of emotional distraction. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5324.

Council of Science Editors:

Murphy J. EEG evidence for the effective proactive control of emotional distraction. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5324


Victoria University of Wellington

7. Moody, Rosanna. Testing the Asymmetric Inhibition Model: Frontal EEG Asymmetry Does Not Predict Inhibitory Control of Emotional Distractors.

Degree: 2016, Victoria University of Wellington

 Frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) asymmetry is a reliable marker of psychopathology vulnerability, yet the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear. There is accumulating evidence that frontal… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cognitive control; Frontal asymmetry; Emotion; Distraction; EEG

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APA (6th Edition):

Moody, R. (2016). Testing the Asymmetric Inhibition Model: Frontal EEG Asymmetry Does Not Predict Inhibitory Control of Emotional Distractors. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5423

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moody, Rosanna. “Testing the Asymmetric Inhibition Model: Frontal EEG Asymmetry Does Not Predict Inhibitory Control of Emotional Distractors.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5423.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moody, Rosanna. “Testing the Asymmetric Inhibition Model: Frontal EEG Asymmetry Does Not Predict Inhibitory Control of Emotional Distractors.” 2016. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Moody R. Testing the Asymmetric Inhibition Model: Frontal EEG Asymmetry Does Not Predict Inhibitory Control of Emotional Distractors. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5423.

Council of Science Editors:

Moody R. Testing the Asymmetric Inhibition Model: Frontal EEG Asymmetry Does Not Predict Inhibitory Control of Emotional Distractors. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5423


Victoria University of Wellington

8. Séguin, Julie Anne. The Effect of Emotion on Time Perception for Complex Visual Stimuli.

Degree: 2013, Victoria University of Wellington

 Activation and attention have opposite effects on time perception. Emotion can both increase physiological activation (which leads to overestimation of time) and attract attention (which… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Time perception; Emotion; Attention

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APA (6th Edition):

Séguin, J. A. (2013). The Effect of Emotion on Time Perception for Complex Visual Stimuli. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2708

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Séguin, Julie Anne. “The Effect of Emotion on Time Perception for Complex Visual Stimuli.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2708.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Séguin, Julie Anne. “The Effect of Emotion on Time Perception for Complex Visual Stimuli.” 2013. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Séguin JA. The Effect of Emotion on Time Perception for Complex Visual Stimuli. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2708.

Council of Science Editors:

Séguin JA. The Effect of Emotion on Time Perception for Complex Visual Stimuli. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2708


Victoria University of Wellington

9. Stewart, Jessie E. Do You Have a "Strict Purse"? The Routes to Meaning in Metaphor.

Degree: 2012, Victoria University of Wellington

 Theoretically there are two processing systems through which meaning can be found for a given statement: an effortless, associative processing system (meaning retrieval), or an… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: N400; Metaphor; Dual processes

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APA (6th Edition):

Stewart, J. E. (2012). Do You Have a "Strict Purse"? The Routes to Meaning in Metaphor. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2120

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stewart, Jessie E. “Do You Have a "Strict Purse"? The Routes to Meaning in Metaphor.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2120.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stewart, Jessie E. “Do You Have a "Strict Purse"? The Routes to Meaning in Metaphor.” 2012. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Stewart JE. Do You Have a "Strict Purse"? The Routes to Meaning in Metaphor. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2120.

Council of Science Editors:

Stewart JE. Do You Have a "Strict Purse"? The Routes to Meaning in Metaphor. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2120


Victoria University of Wellington

10. Bryson, Frances Marie. The Time-Course of Induced Interpretive Biases in Healthy Individuals Varying in Depressive Symptoms.

Degree: 2012, Victoria University of Wellington

 Cognitive theories of depression posit that after a negative event or mood state, those vulnerable to the disorder automatically impose negative interpretations on ambiguous information.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: CBM; Cognitive Bias Modification; Depression

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APA (6th Edition):

Bryson, F. M. (2012). The Time-Course of Induced Interpretive Biases in Healthy Individuals Varying in Depressive Symptoms. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2328

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bryson, Frances Marie. “The Time-Course of Induced Interpretive Biases in Healthy Individuals Varying in Depressive Symptoms.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2328.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bryson, Frances Marie. “The Time-Course of Induced Interpretive Biases in Healthy Individuals Varying in Depressive Symptoms.” 2012. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bryson FM. The Time-Course of Induced Interpretive Biases in Healthy Individuals Varying in Depressive Symptoms. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2012. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2328.

Council of Science Editors:

Bryson FM. The Time-Course of Induced Interpretive Biases in Healthy Individuals Varying in Depressive Symptoms. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2328


Victoria University of Wellington

11. Jenkins, Daniel. Awareness and Integration: Understanding the Challenges of Inferring Multisensory Integration Outside of Awareness.

Degree: 2019, Victoria University of Wellington

 Multisensory integration describes the cognitive processes by which information from various perceptual domains is combined to create coherent percepts. For consciously aware perception, multisensory integration… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Consciousness; Multisensory integration; Awareness; Vision; Audition; Perception; Continuous flash suppression

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APA (6th Edition):

Jenkins, D. (2019). Awareness and Integration: Understanding the Challenges of Inferring Multisensory Integration Outside of Awareness. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/8155

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jenkins, Daniel. “Awareness and Integration: Understanding the Challenges of Inferring Multisensory Integration Outside of Awareness.” 2019. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/8155.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jenkins, Daniel. “Awareness and Integration: Understanding the Challenges of Inferring Multisensory Integration Outside of Awareness.” 2019. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Jenkins D. Awareness and Integration: Understanding the Challenges of Inferring Multisensory Integration Outside of Awareness. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/8155.

Council of Science Editors:

Jenkins D. Awareness and Integration: Understanding the Challenges of Inferring Multisensory Integration Outside of Awareness. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/8155


Victoria University of Wellington

12. Phillips, Joseph. The Role of Emotional Content in the Control of Eye Movements.

Degree: 2009, Victoria University of Wellington

 The anti-saccade paradigm has been a favourite among researchers of attention and the control of eye movements. Most pro/anti-saccade studies have utilized meaningless stimuli, though… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Emotion; Saccadic control; Antisaccades

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APA (6th Edition):

Phillips, J. (2009). The Role of Emotional Content in the Control of Eye Movements. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1363

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Phillips, Joseph. “The Role of Emotional Content in the Control of Eye Movements.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1363.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Phillips, Joseph. “The Role of Emotional Content in the Control of Eye Movements.” 2009. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Phillips J. The Role of Emotional Content in the Control of Eye Movements. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2009. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1363.

Council of Science Editors:

Phillips J. The Role of Emotional Content in the Control of Eye Movements. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1363


Victoria University of Wellington

13. Robinson, Kealagh. Reciprocal risk: The longitudinal relationship between emotion regulation and non-suicidal self-injury.

Degree: 2017, Victoria University of Wellington

 Poor emotion regulation has been highlighted as a potential risk factor for the development and maintenance of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI; Fox et al., 2015). However,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Self-injury; Emotion regulation; Adolescent development

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APA (6th Edition):

Robinson, K. (2017). Reciprocal risk: The longitudinal relationship between emotion regulation and non-suicidal self-injury. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/6829

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Robinson, Kealagh. “Reciprocal risk: The longitudinal relationship between emotion regulation and non-suicidal self-injury.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/6829.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Robinson, Kealagh. “Reciprocal risk: The longitudinal relationship between emotion regulation and non-suicidal self-injury.” 2017. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Robinson K. Reciprocal risk: The longitudinal relationship between emotion regulation and non-suicidal self-injury. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/6829.

Council of Science Editors:

Robinson K. Reciprocal risk: The longitudinal relationship between emotion regulation and non-suicidal self-injury. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/6829


Victoria University of Wellington

14. Godfrey, Hazel. A role for attentional bias in cognitive deficits in chronic pain?.

Degree: 2017, Victoria University of Wellington

 This thesis extends current understanding of cognitive deficits in people with chronic pain, specifically those related to attention. Researchers have proposed that attentional capacity is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Chronic pain; Attentional bias; Cognitive deficits

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APA (6th Edition):

Godfrey, H. (2017). A role for attentional bias in cognitive deficits in chronic pain?. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/6814

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Godfrey, Hazel. “A role for attentional bias in cognitive deficits in chronic pain?.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/6814.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Godfrey, Hazel. “A role for attentional bias in cognitive deficits in chronic pain?.” 2017. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Godfrey H. A role for attentional bias in cognitive deficits in chronic pain?. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/6814.

Council of Science Editors:

Godfrey H. A role for attentional bias in cognitive deficits in chronic pain?. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/6814


Victoria University of Wellington

15. Christopher, Kameron. Personalised Prediction of Self-Reported Emotion Responses to Music Stimuli.

Degree: 2019, Victoria University of Wellington

 In this thesis I develop a robust system and method for predicting individuals’ emotional responses to musical stimuli. Music has a powerful effect on human… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Deep learning; Machine leaning; Recommender systems; Emotion research; Affect recognition; Emotion prediction; Digital signal processing

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APA (6th Edition):

Christopher, K. (2019). Personalised Prediction of Self-Reported Emotion Responses to Music Stimuli. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/8091

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Christopher, Kameron. “Personalised Prediction of Self-Reported Emotion Responses to Music Stimuli.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/8091.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Christopher, Kameron. “Personalised Prediction of Self-Reported Emotion Responses to Music Stimuli.” 2019. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Christopher K. Personalised Prediction of Self-Reported Emotion Responses to Music Stimuli. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/8091.

Council of Science Editors:

Christopher K. Personalised Prediction of Self-Reported Emotion Responses to Music Stimuli. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/8091


Victoria University of Wellington

16. Casey, Allanah R. Investigating the relationship between Psychopathy, Fear Conditioning, and Facial Affect Recognition.

Degree: 2013, Victoria University of Wellington

 Psychopathic offenders are often considered to be untreatable, especially dangerous, and at very high risk of reoffending. Psychopathy has generated considerable research interest. Despite this… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Psychopathy; Affect recognition; Fear conditioning

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APA (6th Edition):

Casey, A. R. (2013). Investigating the relationship between Psychopathy, Fear Conditioning, and Facial Affect Recognition. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3014

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Casey, Allanah R. “Investigating the relationship between Psychopathy, Fear Conditioning, and Facial Affect Recognition.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3014.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Casey, Allanah R. “Investigating the relationship between Psychopathy, Fear Conditioning, and Facial Affect Recognition.” 2013. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Casey AR. Investigating the relationship between Psychopathy, Fear Conditioning, and Facial Affect Recognition. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3014.

Council of Science Editors:

Casey AR. Investigating the relationship between Psychopathy, Fear Conditioning, and Facial Affect Recognition. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3014


Victoria University of Wellington

17. Bell, Rebecca K. The Contribution of Cognitive Impulsivity to Criminal Risk.

Degree: 2013, Victoria University of Wellington

 Impulsivity increases risk for general, violent and sexual offending. Accordingly, helping offenders to become better regulators of their impulses is one goal of offender rehabilitation.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Criminal risk; Impulsivity; Criminal behaviour

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APA (6th Edition):

Bell, R. K. (2013). The Contribution of Cognitive Impulsivity to Criminal Risk. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3024

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bell, Rebecca K. “The Contribution of Cognitive Impulsivity to Criminal Risk.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3024.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bell, Rebecca K. “The Contribution of Cognitive Impulsivity to Criminal Risk.” 2013. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Bell RK. The Contribution of Cognitive Impulsivity to Criminal Risk. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3024.

Council of Science Editors:

Bell RK. The Contribution of Cognitive Impulsivity to Criminal Risk. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/3024


Victoria University of Wellington

18. Tooley, Michael Douglas. Emotion Regulation and Vulnerability to Depression: A Longitudinal Test of the Diathesis-Stress Model.

Degree: 2015, Victoria University of Wellington

 Maladaptive emotion regulation is an established vulnerability marker for depression. Within a diathesis-stress framework individual differences in emotion regulation constitute sensitivity to stress, such that… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Emotion regulation; Vulnerability; Diathesis-stress

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APA (6th Edition):

Tooley, M. D. (2015). Emotion Regulation and Vulnerability to Depression: A Longitudinal Test of the Diathesis-Stress Model. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4771

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tooley, Michael Douglas. “Emotion Regulation and Vulnerability to Depression: A Longitudinal Test of the Diathesis-Stress Model.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4771.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tooley, Michael Douglas. “Emotion Regulation and Vulnerability to Depression: A Longitudinal Test of the Diathesis-Stress Model.” 2015. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Tooley MD. Emotion Regulation and Vulnerability to Depression: A Longitudinal Test of the Diathesis-Stress Model. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4771.

Council of Science Editors:

Tooley MD. Emotion Regulation and Vulnerability to Depression: A Longitudinal Test of the Diathesis-Stress Model. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4771


Victoria University of Wellington

19. Clifton, Jessica. Training the Interpretation of Ambiguity.

Degree: 2015, Victoria University of Wellington

 The interpretation of emotionally ambiguous words, sentences, or scenarios can be biased through training procedures that are collectively called Cognitive Bias Modification for Interpretation (CBM-I).… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Interpretation; Ambiguity Resolution; Cognitive Bias

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APA (6th Edition):

Clifton, J. (2015). Training the Interpretation of Ambiguity. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4902

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Clifton, Jessica. “Training the Interpretation of Ambiguity.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4902.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Clifton, Jessica. “Training the Interpretation of Ambiguity.” 2015. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Clifton J. Training the Interpretation of Ambiguity. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4902.

Council of Science Editors:

Clifton J. Training the Interpretation of Ambiguity. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4902


Victoria University of Wellington

20. Walsh, Amy. Motivation reduces positive and negative emotional distractions.

Degree: 2019, Victoria University of Wellington

 Attention is biased toward emotional stimuli, which are often important for our biologically-determined goals of survival and reproduction. But to succeed in our daily tasks… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Motivation; Reward; Emotion; Distraction; Attention; Cognitive control

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APA (6th Edition):

Walsh, A. (2019). Motivation reduces positive and negative emotional distractions. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/8296

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Walsh, Amy. “Motivation reduces positive and negative emotional distractions.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/8296.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Walsh, Amy. “Motivation reduces positive and negative emotional distractions.” 2019. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Walsh A. Motivation reduces positive and negative emotional distractions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/8296.

Council of Science Editors:

Walsh A. Motivation reduces positive and negative emotional distractions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/8296

21. Hogan, Adele Cherise. Distortions in predicted motion: Pitch and direction influence imagined speed for a visual object during occlusion.

Degree: 2015, Victoria University of Wellington

 Visual motion prediction is essential for making key judgements about objects in the environment. These judgements are typically investigated using a time-to-contact (TTC) task, in… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Predicted motion; TMS; Transcranial magnetic stimulation; Pitch

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APA (6th Edition):

Hogan, A. C. (2015). Distortions in predicted motion: Pitch and direction influence imagined speed for a visual object during occlusion. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4708

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hogan, Adele Cherise. “Distortions in predicted motion: Pitch and direction influence imagined speed for a visual object during occlusion.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4708.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hogan, Adele Cherise. “Distortions in predicted motion: Pitch and direction influence imagined speed for a visual object during occlusion.” 2015. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hogan AC. Distortions in predicted motion: Pitch and direction influence imagined speed for a visual object during occlusion. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4708.

Council of Science Editors:

Hogan AC. Distortions in predicted motion: Pitch and direction influence imagined speed for a visual object during occlusion. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4708

22. Kranz, Laura. Proactive Control of Emotional Distraction: An ERP Investigation.

Degree: 2015, Victoria University of Wellington

 According to the Dual Mechanisms of Control (DMC) framework (Braver, 2012) distraction can be controlled either proactively (i.e., before the onset of a distractor) or… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cognitive control; Distraction; Emotion; Attention; ERP

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APA (6th Edition):

Kranz, L. (2015). Proactive Control of Emotional Distraction: An ERP Investigation. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4786

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kranz, Laura. “Proactive Control of Emotional Distraction: An ERP Investigation.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4786.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kranz, Laura. “Proactive Control of Emotional Distraction: An ERP Investigation.” 2015. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Kranz L. Proactive Control of Emotional Distraction: An ERP Investigation. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4786.

Council of Science Editors:

Kranz L. Proactive Control of Emotional Distraction: An ERP Investigation. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4786

23. Michael, Robert. Ordered Questions Bias Eyewitnesses and Jurors.

Degree: 2016, Victoria University of Wellington

 Eyewitnesses play an important role in the justice system. But suggestive questioning can distort eyewitness memory and confidence, and those distorted beliefs influence jurors (Loftus,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Memory; Eyewitness; Juror; Metacognition; Question order

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APA (6th Edition):

Michael, R. (2016). Ordered Questions Bias Eyewitnesses and Jurors. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5140

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Michael, Robert. “Ordered Questions Bias Eyewitnesses and Jurors.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed October 13, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5140.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Michael, Robert. “Ordered Questions Bias Eyewitnesses and Jurors.” 2016. Web. 13 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Michael R. Ordered Questions Bias Eyewitnesses and Jurors. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5140.

Council of Science Editors:

Michael R. Ordered Questions Bias Eyewitnesses and Jurors. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/5140

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