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You searched for +publisher:"Victoria University of Wellington" +contributor:("Green, Vanessa"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Victoria University of Wellington

1. Omoke, Charles Makori. Quality of Education offered to Children with Special Educational Needs (SEN) in the era of Free Primary Education (FPE) in Rural Kenya: Perspectives of Educationists, Teachers and Parents.

Degree: 2011, Victoria University of Wellington

The education of children with special educational needs (SEN) has been a focus of international inquiry. There is a strong advocacy for the inclusion of children with SEN in regular schools although this remains contentious and challenging. Despite an emphasis by the Kenyan government that children with SEN should be included in regular schooling, there has not been substantial investigation especially in rural settings on how these children can receive quality education. This thesis seeks to address this issue by exploring the perspectives of educationists, teachers and parents on the quality of education offered to children with SEN in the era of free primary education in a rural setting. A qualitative interpretive approach to research was used to generate data through interviews with government officials, teachers and parents, focus group discussions with regular teachers and observations in three schools spread over three rural districts. Thematic analysis was employed in analysing the data. A critical theory approach focussing on social justice and rights of children as enshrined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) was used as a lens. The findings revealed that despite policy articulation, children with SEN occupied the role of “others” in schools and the society and were described in negative terms. Participants, especially regular staff and parents were emphatic that children with SEN required “experts” and “special” resources both of which were not available in regular schools. The participants felt that the available curriculum was relevant for “normal” children and therefore could not meet the educational needs of children with SEN. The broad conclusion drawn from this study is that there is need to distinctly define the terms inclusive education, special education and mainstream education in a way that the core stakeholders can understand, interpret and implement within their contexts. Designing a means of progress monitoring other than national examinations may help motivate both regular teachers and parents to see the need to have children with SEN in regular schools. There is need for further investigation on how regular teachers can be persuaded from existing beliefs that they are not qualified to teach children with SEN and how to convince parents that their children are worthy of an education. Advisors/Committee Members: Meyer, Luanna, Green, Vanessa.

Subjects/Keywords: Right to education; Children's rights; Education policy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Omoke, C. M. (2011). Quality of Education offered to Children with Special Educational Needs (SEN) in the era of Free Primary Education (FPE) in Rural Kenya: Perspectives of Educationists, Teachers and Parents. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2002

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Omoke, Charles Makori. “Quality of Education offered to Children with Special Educational Needs (SEN) in the era of Free Primary Education (FPE) in Rural Kenya: Perspectives of Educationists, Teachers and Parents.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed November 19, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2002.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Omoke, Charles Makori. “Quality of Education offered to Children with Special Educational Needs (SEN) in the era of Free Primary Education (FPE) in Rural Kenya: Perspectives of Educationists, Teachers and Parents.” 2011. Web. 19 Nov 2018.

Vancouver:

Omoke CM. Quality of Education offered to Children with Special Educational Needs (SEN) in the era of Free Primary Education (FPE) in Rural Kenya: Perspectives of Educationists, Teachers and Parents. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2011. [cited 2018 Nov 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2002.

Council of Science Editors:

Omoke CM. Quality of Education offered to Children with Special Educational Needs (SEN) in the era of Free Primary Education (FPE) in Rural Kenya: Perspectives of Educationists, Teachers and Parents. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2002


Victoria University of Wellington

2. Achmadi, Donna. Comparing acquisition, preference, maintenance, and social validity of manual sign, picture exchange, and speech-generating devices as AAC options for children with developmental disabilities.

Degree: 2015, Victoria University of Wellington

Background: Communication deficit is a defining characteristic of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental delays/disabilities (DD). In many cases the degree of communication impairment is severe. For example, approximately 25% of children diagnosed with ASD fail to develop sufficient speech to meet their everyday communication needs. In the absence of speech, these children are often taught to use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Three main AAC options have been taught to children with DD. These are (a) manual sign (MS), (b) picture exchange systems (PE), in which the child exchanges a picture card to communicate, and (c) speech-generating device (SGD). Debate persists in the literature as to which of these three options is best suited to address the communication intervention needs of children with DD. With the rapid developments in technology, subsequently, more high-tech devices are being introduced to the field of AAC. Studies have compared these three AAC options, but the literature has not yet compared these three options in terms of long-term maintenance of communication skills and social validity of the AAC systems. Objective: The studies in this thesis focused on (a) comparing acquisition and maintenance of a requesting skill that was taught with each of the three AAC options (MS, PE, and SGD), (b) assessing the participant’s preference of using each of the three AAC options, and (c) assessing stakeholders’ perceptions of each AAC option in terms of perceived (a) intelligibility, (b) ease of acquisition, (c) effectiveness/acceptability, and d) preference. Method: In Study 1, four children with DD were taught to use MS, PE, and SGD to request continuation of toy play (i.e., to request more). This experimental study was implemented using a single-subject alternating-treatment design which was divided into four phases (i.e., baseline, intervention, post-intervention, and follow-up). The effects of intervention on acquisition of the requesting response with each option were evaluated using an alternating-treatments design across participants design. Acquisition and maintenance at 12 to 18 months was compared across the three AAC options in an alternating treatments design. The participants’ preference for using each of the three AAC options was also assessed at regular intervals during the study using a choice-making paradigm. For Study 2, a non-experimental quantitative design was applied. Data were collected using an anonymous five-point Likert-scaled survey that consisted of 11 questions. 104 undergraduate students were shown a video of a person communicating with each AAC option (MS, PE, and SGD in different video clips) then asked to rate each AAC option in terms of perceived (a) intelligibility, (b) ease of acquisition, (c) effectiveness/acceptability, and (d) their preference. Results: Study 1. With intervention, three of the four participants learned to use each of the three AAC options, but one child only learned to use the PE option. Trials to criterion… Advisors/Committee Members: Sigafoos, Jeff, Green, Vanessa, van der Meer, Larah.

Subjects/Keywords: Developmental disabilities; AAC; Augmentative and alternative communication; Validation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Achmadi, D. (2015). Comparing acquisition, preference, maintenance, and social validity of manual sign, picture exchange, and speech-generating devices as AAC options for children with developmental disabilities. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4860

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Achmadi, Donna. “Comparing acquisition, preference, maintenance, and social validity of manual sign, picture exchange, and speech-generating devices as AAC options for children with developmental disabilities.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed November 19, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4860.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Achmadi, Donna. “Comparing acquisition, preference, maintenance, and social validity of manual sign, picture exchange, and speech-generating devices as AAC options for children with developmental disabilities.” 2015. Web. 19 Nov 2018.

Vancouver:

Achmadi D. Comparing acquisition, preference, maintenance, and social validity of manual sign, picture exchange, and speech-generating devices as AAC options for children with developmental disabilities. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2015. [cited 2018 Nov 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4860.

Council of Science Editors:

Achmadi D. Comparing acquisition, preference, maintenance, and social validity of manual sign, picture exchange, and speech-generating devices as AAC options for children with developmental disabilities. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4860


Victoria University of Wellington

3. Mortlock, Anita. Lifting the School Mat: An Investigation of Pedagogy and Children's Social Worlds at Mat Time.

Degree: 2016, Victoria University of Wellington

Primary school teachers’ use of whole-class activity is a well-documented phenomenon. Typically, it is assumed that children’s active participation in group tasks is important for their academic learning and for developing self-concept. However, previous studies have found that children’s participation varies widely. The present research set out to investigate why individual children’s participation differs within the peer group during whole-class activity. Teachers’ pedagogy and children’s social worlds intersect during classroom interactions; it is in this intersecting space that this research is situated. One specific whole-class activity was chosen as a focus, namely mat time. This is a practice whereby the teacher calls the entire class to the mat typically for the purposes of instruction, discussion, or other similar activity. To understand mat time from the perspectives of the people who experience it, two studies were undertaken using a mixed strategy approach for data gathering. The first study investigated teachers’ perspectives (N=296) using a questionnaire. Participants were asked about a variety of themes relating to mat time including pedagogical uses, strategies, and outcomes. Principal components analyses confirmed the approximate uni-dimensionality of the data relating to each theme, which were then calibrated to a measurement variable using Samejima’s (1969, as cited in DeMars, 2010) graded response model. Various correlations and comparisons were conducted pertaining to the pedagogical factors influencing children’s participation, behaviour, and enjoyment. The second study used qualitative semi-structured interviews with children (n=49) from three year two classrooms situated in different schools. The data were analysed and discussed in relation to peer culture and peer-relations theories, which posit that children’s social groups consist of norms and interests that differ to those of adults’, and that such groups consist of internal social hierarchies. Taken together, the findings from the two studies indicated that teachers and children differ in their perception of the social climate at mat time. For instance, whereas teachers tended to report that mat time achieved prosocial objectives, children were more likely to describe socially divisive aspects. Such aspects included certain children’s desire to affiliate with specific peers while excluding others, or promoting their own participation over that of classmates. Seating position and opportunities to take active roles were sources of competition. Children’s differing participation was influenced by their individual strategic understandings of how to secure active roles, social support, and academic confidence. Furthermore, teachers generally reported that children were inattentive during mat time, suggesting that it may be an ineffective context for learning. Nevertheless, when teachers were cognisant of children’s interests, they tended to report better participation across the class. The implications for teaching practice include an onus… Advisors/Committee Members: Green, Vanessa, Shuker, Mary Jane, Johnston, Michael.

Subjects/Keywords: Peer culture; Children; Whole class; Mat time; Circle time; Classroom; Primary school; Participation; Pedagogy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mortlock, A. (2016). Lifting the School Mat: An Investigation of Pedagogy and Children's Social Worlds at Mat Time. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4966

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mortlock, Anita. “Lifting the School Mat: An Investigation of Pedagogy and Children's Social Worlds at Mat Time.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed November 19, 2018. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4966.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mortlock, Anita. “Lifting the School Mat: An Investigation of Pedagogy and Children's Social Worlds at Mat Time.” 2016. Web. 19 Nov 2018.

Vancouver:

Mortlock A. Lifting the School Mat: An Investigation of Pedagogy and Children's Social Worlds at Mat Time. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2016. [cited 2018 Nov 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4966.

Council of Science Editors:

Mortlock A. Lifting the School Mat: An Investigation of Pedagogy and Children's Social Worlds at Mat Time. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/4966

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