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You searched for +publisher:"Victoria University of Wellington" +contributor:("Goldstein, Ray"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Victoria University of Wellington

1. Boswell, Bronwin M. The Evolution of International Policing in the Pacific: a Critical Analysis.

Degree: 2010, Victoria University of Wellington

I have been involved in policing and crime prevention for many years. I was a sworn member of Victoria Police (Australia), a crime prevention coordinator in a New Zealand community, and am currently employed by New Zealand Police (NZP). My interest in international policing grew as I realised more and more police were serving in a number of roles overseas. At first, I thought this a nice departure from normal duties for those lucky enough to take up opportunities to contribute to policing in other countries. Deeper thought followed about the juxtaposition of western models of policing, international relations and the customs of developing countries. The more I tried to find out the more questions were raised. Soon it was evident that little had been written about international policing and even less about international policing in relation to the Pacific. The need for research that combines the study of cross-border policing of crime and criminality with international relations scholarship has been identified by Peter Andreas and Ethan Nadelmann in their 2006 co-authored book. A growing body of literature examines policing and development in the Pacific, but is mainly centred on conflicts in Melanesia with particular emphasis on the Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands (RAMSI). Apparently, no single work discusses the needs of police services in the Pacific in relation to domestic policing and international cooperation. This work seeks to fill that gap. Advisors/Committee Members: McLeay, Elizabeth, Goldstein, Ray.

Subjects/Keywords: International policing; Pacific

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APA (6th Edition):

Boswell, B. M. (2010). The Evolution of International Policing in the Pacific: a Critical Analysis. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1520

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Boswell, Bronwin M. “The Evolution of International Policing in the Pacific: a Critical Analysis.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed May 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1520.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Boswell, Bronwin M. “The Evolution of International Policing in the Pacific: a Critical Analysis.” 2010. Web. 24 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Boswell BM. The Evolution of International Policing in the Pacific: a Critical Analysis. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2010. [cited 2019 May 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1520.

Council of Science Editors:

Boswell BM. The Evolution of International Policing in the Pacific: a Critical Analysis. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1520


Victoria University of Wellington

2. Wigley, Jennifer. The Politics of Fertility: The Global Emergence of 'Pro-Family' Organisations.

Degree: 2009, Victoria University of Wellington

This thesis is part of a small but growing literature on the activism of Christian Right 'pro-family' organisations from the United States (US) in international development politics. This thesis provides a detailed analysis of the texts of five globally active 'pro-family'organisations from 1997 until the end of 2008. One of the major findings is that the 'pro-family' political project, previously defined as the defence of the family against powerful global elites, is now being articulated against values associated with industrialisation and modernity. Through this change, longheld Christian Right tenets such as hostility to feminism, staunch adherence to free markets, and suspicion of the UN, are being reconsidered or redefined to suit the needs of the 'pro-family' movement. By mapping the ways that 'pro-family' discourse is changing, this thesis shows the impacts that globalization and involvement at the UN is having on this set of conservative Christians, and how their agenda is changing as a result of their political activism outside of the US. This thesis provides a current, comprehensive and reliable review of the activist publications of the US 'pro-family' movement, and as such, offers an insight into the changing agenda of a movement that is growing both in organisational aptitude and in global influence. Advisors/Committee Members: Moloney, Pat, Goldstein, Ray.

Subjects/Keywords: Christian Right; Globalization; Globalisation; Family

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wigley, J. (2009). The Politics of Fertility: The Global Emergence of 'Pro-Family' Organisations. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1189

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wigley, Jennifer. “The Politics of Fertility: The Global Emergence of 'Pro-Family' Organisations.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed May 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1189.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wigley, Jennifer. “The Politics of Fertility: The Global Emergence of 'Pro-Family' Organisations.” 2009. Web. 24 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Wigley J. The Politics of Fertility: The Global Emergence of 'Pro-Family' Organisations. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2009. [cited 2019 May 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1189.

Council of Science Editors:

Wigley J. The Politics of Fertility: The Global Emergence of 'Pro-Family' Organisations. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1189


Victoria University of Wellington

3. Edgecombe, Anita. Being accountable to Aceh: gender-related lessons learned by New Zealand NGOs from the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004.

Degree: 2008, Victoria University of Wellington

The Indian Ocean Boxing Day Tsunami of 2004 prompted a level of international disaster response that was unprecedented. In Aceh, Indonesia, the worst hit region, thousands of international non-governmental organisations (INGOs), including some New Zealand based NGOs, arrived in the area to carry out relief and reconstruction work. A common criticism of the international response is that it has resulted in the marginalisation of Acehnese women. The criticism comes despite at least fifteen years of gender mainstreaming into the policies and practices of development organisations and the widespread acceptance that attention to gender issues is essential for sustainable and equitable development. It also comes at a time when there is ever-increasing demand for NGO accountability to donors and beneficiaries and a recognition that NGOs should continuously be learning to improve future practice and ensure they are meeting their stated goals. Post-tsunami Aceh posed a number of context-specific challenges to the implementation of gender policies, including the enormous extent of the devastation, the history of violent conflict and the rule of Sharia law. This research investigates the particular challenges and experiences workers of NZ-based NGOs faced in implementing their gender policies in the aftermath of the tsunami in Aceh, and how those NGOs responded to the challenges and experiences to ensure lessons have been learned. It also investigates whether any obstacles to learning lessons exist within those organisations. Qualitative research is used including gathering primary data from semi-structured interviews with individuals from five NZ NGOs that worked in Aceh and with representatives of NGOs willing to comment on their organisational responses. Additional comments on the issues are also obtained from two NZAID (New Zealand Agency for International Development) staff. The findings show that while participants faced numerous gender-related challenges in their work in Aceh, approximately three years after the tsunami none were able to point to any specific gender-related lessons learned. The findings also reveal that participating NGOs tend to draw learning from their international affiliates and from the NZ NGO community rather than having structured learning systems within their own organisations. A number of barriers to learning within organisations are also identified. These results, while not necessarily representative of the wider NZ NGO community, reveal the difficulties of trying to implement gender policies in a particular emergency context and contribute to an understanding of how NZ NGOs are involved in a process of continuous learning to incorporate their own experiences to ensure lessons are learned and improve their accountability. Advisors/Committee Members: Goldstein, Ray.

Subjects/Keywords: Aceh; Gender; Tsunami

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Edgecombe, A. (2008). Being accountable to Aceh: gender-related lessons learned by New Zealand NGOs from the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1757

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Edgecombe, Anita. “Being accountable to Aceh: gender-related lessons learned by New Zealand NGOs from the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004.” 2008. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed May 24, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1757.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Edgecombe, Anita. “Being accountable to Aceh: gender-related lessons learned by New Zealand NGOs from the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004.” 2008. Web. 24 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Edgecombe A. Being accountable to Aceh: gender-related lessons learned by New Zealand NGOs from the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2008. [cited 2019 May 24]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1757.

Council of Science Editors:

Edgecombe A. Being accountable to Aceh: gender-related lessons learned by New Zealand NGOs from the Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2008. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1757

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