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You searched for +publisher:"Victoria University of Wellington" +contributor:("Gigliotti, Simone"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Victoria University of Wellington

1. Caldwell, Jessica. Holocaust Consciousness in New Zealand 1980-2010: A Study.

Degree: 2011, Victoria University of Wellington

This thesis chronicles and examines the major New Zealand specific Holocaust-related issues of the last three decades, in the time period 1980 to 2010. The Holocaust has had a long reaching legacy worldwide since the end of the Second World War. There have been major news items and issues that have brought the Holocaust to the forefront of people's consciousness throughout the decades, the most prominent example being the trial of Adolf Eichmann in 1961. It was major news such as that trial, as well as Hollywood productions such as the TV miniseries Holocaust in the late 1970s, that brought about widespread consciousness of the Holocaust worldwide, in countries such as the United States and Australia. In New Zealand, but major Holocaust-related issues connected specifically to New Zealand did not begin to emerge until the 1980s. This thesis investigates, in three chapters, differing issues over the aforementioned time period that have had an impact on consciousness of the Holocaust in New Zealand. The issues investigated are respectively: the war criminals investigation of the late 1980s and early 1990s, the colonial 'holocaust' argument of the late 1990s and early 2000s, Holocaust denial controversies in New Zealand academia, and the growth and evolution of Holocaust commemoration and education. Although some issues, such as commemoration and education, began earlier, it was not until the 1980s that these issues developed in earnest and a greater number of people began to take notice of the connection of these issues, and in turn New Zealand, to the Holocaust. The main arguments made in this thesis are that New Zealand's consciousness of the Holocaust developed when it did and at the rate it did because of particular aspects of the Jewish community and New Zealand society as a whole, including the geographical isolation of the country, the size and assimilation of the Jewish and survivor communities here, and the overall attitudes and on occasion apathy and ignorance towards the Holocaust. All of these aspects have influenced, to varying degrees, consciousness of the Holocaust within New Zealand throughout the time period of 1980 to 2010. Advisors/Committee Members: Gigliotti, Simone.

Subjects/Keywords: Holocaust; New Zealand; Consciousness

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APA (6th Edition):

Caldwell, J. (2011). Holocaust Consciousness in New Zealand 1980-2010: A Study. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2028

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Caldwell, Jessica. “Holocaust Consciousness in New Zealand 1980-2010: A Study.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2028.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Caldwell, Jessica. “Holocaust Consciousness in New Zealand 1980-2010: A Study.” 2011. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Caldwell J. Holocaust Consciousness in New Zealand 1980-2010: A Study. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2011. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2028.

Council of Science Editors:

Caldwell J. Holocaust Consciousness in New Zealand 1980-2010: A Study. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2028


Victoria University of Wellington

2. Paul, Jane. Visual Histories: Amateur Film in New Zealand c.1923-1970.

Degree: 2013, Victoria University of Wellington

Many ordinary New Zealanders made amateur films between c.1923-1970. This thesis explores the types of films they made; home movies, community films and films made by members of amateur cine clubs. The discussion focuses on the making, showing and viewing of each of these types of films. Some were shown in private home or club situations, while other films were shown publicly. As a group of films and film practises they offer a valuable source of information on social and cultural history. Their construction differs from orthodox professional film and offers important alternate views of New Zealand society. The sub-genre of amateur film are numerous. Films discussed include newsreels and scripted narrative drama made by amateur cine club members either working alone or in groups. Others under discussion are local films, political films, mountaineering films, educational, instructional and promotional film. The influences on amateur filmmaking are considered: camera company marketing and amateur film manuals, the international amateur film movement and the competition focused cine club culture. The thesis uses four main collections to discuss aspects of amateur filmmaking. These are the films of James Osler of Wairoa, Frederick Thorn of Waiuta, Amos James Smith of Rangiora and Nancy Cameron of Whanganui, all held at the New Zealand Film Archive, Wellington. Advisors/Committee Members: Gigliotti, Simone, Macdonald, Charlotte.

Subjects/Keywords: Amateur film; Social history; Home movies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Paul, J. (2013). Visual Histories: Amateur Film in New Zealand c.1923-1970. (Masters Thesis). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2937

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Paul, Jane. “Visual Histories: Amateur Film in New Zealand c.1923-1970.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2937.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Paul, Jane. “Visual Histories: Amateur Film in New Zealand c.1923-1970.” 2013. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Paul J. Visual Histories: Amateur Film in New Zealand c.1923-1970. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2013. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2937.

Council of Science Editors:

Paul J. Visual Histories: Amateur Film in New Zealand c.1923-1970. [Masters Thesis]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/2937


Victoria University of Wellington

3. Russell, Nestar John Charles. Stanley Milgram's Obedience to Authority Experiments: Towards an Understanding of Their Relevance in Explaining Aspects of the Nazi Holocaust.

Degree: 2009, Victoria University of Wellington

Two leading Holocaust historians, Yehuda Bauer and Christopher Browning, have in recent years independently asked how so many ordinary Germans (most of whom in the 1930s had been moderately anti-Semitic) could become by the early 1940s willing murderers of Jews. Social psychologist, Stanley Milgram, had years before been interested in finding answers to similar questions, and to that end in the early 1960s carried out his widely debated "Obedience to Authority" (OTA) experiments at Yale University. Drawing on previously unpublished material from Milgram's personal archive at Yale, this thesis investigates how Milgram developed his research idea to the point where, by the time he ran his first official experiment, he was able to convert the majority of his ordinary subjects into torturers of other people. It is argued that Milgram's experiments were in themselves structured as a bureaucratic microcosm, and say less about obedience to authority, per se, than about the ways in which people in an organisational context resolve a pressing moral dilemma. The thesis uses insights gained from Milgram's experimental innovations to assist in answering the question posed by Bauer and by Browning, focusing on the Nazis' progressive development of mass killing methods, from 1941 to 1944, during Operation Barbarossa and Operation Reinhard. It is shown how these methods were designed to diminish perpetrators' perceptual stimulation, in order to make the "undoable" increasingly "doable", in ways that were later reflected in Milgram's development of his own experimental methodology. Advisors/Committee Members: Gigliotti, Simone, Gregory, Bob.

Subjects/Keywords: European history; Holocaust; Stanley Milgram; Obedience

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Russell, N. J. C. (2009). Stanley Milgram's Obedience to Authority Experiments: Towards an Understanding of Their Relevance in Explaining Aspects of the Nazi Holocaust. (Doctoral Dissertation). Victoria University of Wellington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1091

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Russell, Nestar John Charles. “Stanley Milgram's Obedience to Authority Experiments: Towards an Understanding of Their Relevance in Explaining Aspects of the Nazi Holocaust.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington. Accessed June 18, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1091.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Russell, Nestar John Charles. “Stanley Milgram's Obedience to Authority Experiments: Towards an Understanding of Their Relevance in Explaining Aspects of the Nazi Holocaust.” 2009. Web. 18 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Russell NJC. Stanley Milgram's Obedience to Authority Experiments: Towards an Understanding of Their Relevance in Explaining Aspects of the Nazi Holocaust. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2009. [cited 2019 Jun 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1091.

Council of Science Editors:

Russell NJC. Stanley Milgram's Obedience to Authority Experiments: Towards an Understanding of Their Relevance in Explaining Aspects of the Nazi Holocaust. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Victoria University of Wellington; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10063/1091

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