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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Theodore A. Smith"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Williams, Jennifer Johnson. Ambiguity, Liminality, and Unhomeliness in the Book of Judges: An Analysis of Gendered Pairs and Families.

Degree: PhD, Religion, 2015, Vanderbilt University

Ambiguity, Liminality, and Unhomeliness in the Book of Judges: An Analysis of the Gendered Pairs and Families by Jennifer Johnson Williams Dissertation under the direction of Professor Jack M. Sasson This dissertation investigates the creation and dissolution of families in four stories in the book of Judges (Judges 19, 4-5, 11, and 13-16), providing a nuanced feminist interpretation of some of the bookâs most challenging and violent stories. The foundation of this study is a literary analysis of the four episodes, focusing principally on characterization of the gendered pairs in each story. The approach also deploys contemporary reading strategies from feminist, anthropological and postcolonial thought. A literary and ideological reading of these stories reveals that the history in the text is concerned with many issues such as social deterioration and the movement toward kingship, war and families, Israelâs apostasy and YHWHâs guiding hand, the stories of individual people and the story of all of Israel. The project demonstrates that as the condition of Israel deteriorates in the course of the book, clear boundaries and divisions of gender also break down. This blurring of boundaries and narrative ambiguity often occur in the narratives through the exploitation of liminal spaces, times, and characters and in the representation of unhomeliness. In turn, this deconstruction creates elements of complexity and ambiguity, fear and suspicion. A literary reading that focuses on what happens at the level of family divulges an ideological concern with the roles, places, and statuses of women and the ways in which they operate in domestic and extra domestic functions. A concern with how women contribute to the realization of the ideal group identity becomes apparent. Similarly, the embedded ideology of the text reveals a concern with pressure from inside and outside groups, not just through war but through marriage, kinship, and inheritance issues. Advisors/Committee Members: Herbert Marbury (committee member), Annalisa Azzoni (committee member), Doug A. Knight (committee member), Jack M. Sasson (chair), Theodore A. Smith (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: feminist scholarship; violence; women in the Bible; threshold; mothers; daughters; wives; politics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Williams, J. J. (2015). Ambiguity, Liminality, and Unhomeliness in the Book of Judges: An Analysis of Gendered Pairs and Families. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03232015-170925/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Williams, Jennifer Johnson. “Ambiguity, Liminality, and Unhomeliness in the Book of Judges: An Analysis of Gendered Pairs and Families.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed October 20, 2019. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03232015-170925/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Williams, Jennifer Johnson. “Ambiguity, Liminality, and Unhomeliness in the Book of Judges: An Analysis of Gendered Pairs and Families.” 2015. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Williams JJ. Ambiguity, Liminality, and Unhomeliness in the Book of Judges: An Analysis of Gendered Pairs and Families. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03232015-170925/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Williams JJ. Ambiguity, Liminality, and Unhomeliness in the Book of Judges: An Analysis of Gendered Pairs and Families. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03232015-170925/ ;


Vanderbilt University

2. Todd, Asante Uzuri. The One and the Many: A Discourse Analysis on Sovereignty in Liberal Civic Republicanism with Prospects for an African American Political Theology.

Degree: PhD, Religion, 2016, Vanderbilt University

Dissertation under the direction of Dr. Victor Anderson: The one and the many has been the perennial philosophical problem from Plato, Augustine, and Aquinas to H. Richard Niebuhrâs classic, Radical Monotheism and Western Culture. This dissertation tracks sovereignty as a political symbol throughout modern Western political theory. It begins with the early modern writings of French theorist Jean Bodin (1530-1596) and English philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), both of whom embraced monarchial views of sovereignty. It then tracks the four-fold transmigration of the discourse on political sovereignty, which rests next on âthe peopleâ in the theories of John Locke (1632-1704) and Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778). With Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) and GWF Hegel (1770-1831) sovereignty comes to nest in the authority of âreasonâ, which itself mutates from a self-limiting process for the sake of unity into a totalizing metaphysical entity. Finally, sovereignty comes to rest on âthe dictatorâ for German jurist Carl Schmitt (1888-1985) and nationalist âideologyâ for German political theorist Hannah Arendt (1906-1975). This dissertation finds that sovereignty is justified by two doctrines in Western canonical discourse: that of âthe state of natureâ and âthe political body.â The state of nature is a figure of speech, a primordial myth that has been taken literally, and the political symbol of the âpolitical bodyâ is mimetically derived from oneâs view on nature. Thinking on the state of nature conditions thinking on the political body, and thus the state of nature becomes the central theme for how one thinks about sovereignty. This dissertation finds that Hobbesâ doctrine of the state of nature has become hegemonic in the discourse on sovereignty, and that his doctrines of the state of nature and the body politic have problematic enduring cultural-historical effects, especially for African Americans and the worldâs poor. The conclusion proposes implications of this migratory narrative of sovereignty from monarchialism to ideology in light of Italian philosopher Giorgio Agambenâs discourse on the âstate of exceptionâ and African American cultural critic Cornel Westâs description of the new American imperialism. This dissertation attacks the âsecularization thesisâ about sovereignty, where according to theologians such as Anglian thinker John Milbank (1952), sovereignty has is legitimated by a heterodox theology (Theology and Social Theory, 1990, 2006). The discourse on sovereignty is necessarily embedded in political-theological discourse. Thus political theologians bear a great responsibility for the history of effects and consequences of sovereignty as the ideology of totality and power in the twenty-first century. In this sense the dissertation is prolegomena to an African American political theology in the state of exception (Agamben) and the henotheism of the market forces of aggressive militarism (where might makes right), free-market fundamentalism (an unfettered, deregulated market, even at the expense of public… Advisors/Committee Members: Victor Anderson (chair), Ellen T. Armour, Ph.D. (committee member), Stacey Floyd-Thomas (committee member), Theodore A. Smith (committee member), Tracy Sharpley-Whiting (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: political theology; black theology; liberalism; civic republicanism; sovereignty; public theology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Todd, A. U. (2016). The One and the Many: A Discourse Analysis on Sovereignty in Liberal Civic Republicanism with Prospects for an African American Political Theology. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-04272016-162856/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Todd, Asante Uzuri. “The One and the Many: A Discourse Analysis on Sovereignty in Liberal Civic Republicanism with Prospects for an African American Political Theology.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed October 20, 2019. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-04272016-162856/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Todd, Asante Uzuri. “The One and the Many: A Discourse Analysis on Sovereignty in Liberal Civic Republicanism with Prospects for an African American Political Theology.” 2016. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Todd AU. The One and the Many: A Discourse Analysis on Sovereignty in Liberal Civic Republicanism with Prospects for an African American Political Theology. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-04272016-162856/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Todd AU. The One and the Many: A Discourse Analysis on Sovereignty in Liberal Civic Republicanism with Prospects for an African American Political Theology. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2016. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-04272016-162856/ ;

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