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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Ray Stokes Peebles Jr., MD"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Bloodworth, Melissa Harintho. Regulation of Immune Responses during Airway Inflammation.

Degree: PhD, Microbiology and Immunology, 2017, Vanderbilt University

Allergic asthma is refractory to corticosteroid treatment in up to 10% of patients and often leads to hospital admissions caused by respiratory viral and/ or bacterial infections. In these studies, I found that: 1) STAT6 inhibited innate γδ17 cell immune responses. STAT6 suppression of γδ17 cell function may provide one explanation for why asthmatic patients have significantly greater risk for invasive bacterial disease, including pneumonia, than nonasthmatic subjects. 2) A GLP-1R agonist, an FDA-approved agent currently used for Type II Diabetes, attenuated the type 2 immune response to RSV and attenuates RSV illness. The current availability of GLP-1R agonists for human treatment highlights the clinical significance of these studies as this therapy could be immediately transferrable to RSV disease. 3) PGI2, an FDA-approved agent currently used for pulmonary hypertension, protected against autoimmunity; enhanced Treg stability and function; rendered T effector cells more susceptible to Treg- mediated suppression; and promoted iTreg differentiation. PGI2 may therefore represent a novel treatment strategy for diseases that result from Treg dysregulation. Advisors/Committee Members: Ray Stokes Peebles Jr., MD (committee member), Wonder Drake, MD (committee member), Joshua P. Fessel, MD, PhD (committee member), Amy S. Major, PhD (committee member), John V. Williams (committee member), David M. Aronoff, MD (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: type 2 immunity (Th2); gamma-delta 17 (γδ17) cells; STAT6; Klebsiella pneumoniae; glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1); respiratory syncytial virus (RSV); phenome-wide association study (PheWAS); regulatory T cells (Tregs); prostacyclin (PGI2)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bloodworth, M. H. (2017). Regulation of Immune Responses during Airway Inflammation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/11246

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bloodworth, Melissa Harintho. “Regulation of Immune Responses during Airway Inflammation.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/11246.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bloodworth, Melissa Harintho. “Regulation of Immune Responses during Airway Inflammation.” 2017. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Bloodworth MH. Regulation of Immune Responses during Airway Inflammation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/11246.

Council of Science Editors:

Bloodworth MH. Regulation of Immune Responses during Airway Inflammation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/11246


Vanderbilt University

2. Konvinse, Katherine Chanel. Genetic Risk Factors and Immunopathogenesis of Antimicrobial-Induced Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions.

Degree: PhD, Microbiology and Immunology, 2019, Vanderbilt University

Adverse reactions to drugs are a threat to individual safety and quality of life. Two of the severest reactions, Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) and Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS), are the consequences of aberrant immune responses. Patients with SJS/TEN develop a painful, blistering rash that results in separation and death of the upper skin layer often leading to serious infections and long-term effects such as blindness. DRESS presents with rash, fever, white blood cell abnormalities, organ failure and long-term immune abnormalities. Nevirapine and vancomycin are commonly used to treat life-threatening infections due to HIV and bacteria, respectively, and are known to cause both DRESS and SJS/TEN. A targeted approach examined variation in HLA genes that encode proteins that present foreign peptides on the surface of cells to stimulate an immune response. HLA-C*04:01 was identified as a necessary risk factor for nevirapine-induced SJS/TEN in a South African patient cohort and HLA-A*32:01 was strongly associated with the development of vancomycin-induced DRESS in a population of predominately European ancestry. For nevirapine and vancomycin SJS/TEN, cutting-edge techniques were used to profile the specific molecular and cellular signatures of individual cells at the site of tissue damage. These discoveries have the potential for direct translation to both scientific and clinical practice to understand, predict and prevent serious immune-mediated adverse drug reactions and to improve drug safety and patient outcomes. Advisors/Committee Members: Elizabeth J. Phillips, MD, Thesis Advisor (committee member), Dan M. Roden, MD (committee member), Ray Stokes Peebles, Jr., MD (committee member), Dawn C. Newcomb, PhD (committee member), Justin M. Balko, PharmD, PhD (committee member), David M. Aronoff, MD (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Human Leukocyte Antigen; Drug Allergy; Hypersensitivity; Nevirapine; Pharmacogenetics; Vancomycin

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Konvinse, K. C. (2019). Genetic Risk Factors and Immunopathogenesis of Antimicrobial-Induced Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/15417

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Konvinse, Katherine Chanel. “Genetic Risk Factors and Immunopathogenesis of Antimicrobial-Induced Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/15417.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Konvinse, Katherine Chanel. “Genetic Risk Factors and Immunopathogenesis of Antimicrobial-Induced Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions.” 2019. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Konvinse KC. Genetic Risk Factors and Immunopathogenesis of Antimicrobial-Induced Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/15417.

Council of Science Editors:

Konvinse KC. Genetic Risk Factors and Immunopathogenesis of Antimicrobial-Induced Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/15417

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